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  1. Gerry Conlon - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Gerry_Conlon

    Gerry Conlon was born in Belfast and grew up at 7 Peel Street on the corner of Mary Street in the impoverished but close-knit community of the Lower Falls Road. He described his childhood as happy. His father was Giuseppe Conlon, a factory worker, and his mother was Sarah Conlon, a hospital cleaner. In 1974, at age 20, Conlon went to England to seek work and to escape the everyday violence he was encountering on the streets of Belfast.

    • 21 June 2014 (aged 60), Belfast, Northern Ireland
    • Convicted on 22 October 1975 and sentenced to life imprisonment
    • Gerard Conlon, 1 March 1954, Belfast, Northern Ireland
    • Conviction quashed by Court of Appeal on 19 October 1989
  2. Gerry Conlon - Biography - IMDb

    www.imdb.com › name › nm0174840

    Mini Bio (1) Gerry Conlon was born on March 1, 1954 in Belfast, Northern Ireland as Gerard Conlon. He was an actor and writer, known for In the Name of the Father (1993), Jig (2011) and Face (1997). He died on June 21, 2014 in Belfast.

  3. Gerry Conlon - IMDb

    m.imdb.com › name › nm0174840

    Filmography. Known For. In the Name of the Father Writer (1993) Jig Music Department (2011) Face Vince (1997) Known For. 60 Minutes Self - Falsely Convicted (segment "This Happy Breed") (1993) Actor.

    • March 1, 1954
    • June 21, 2014
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  5. List of Judy Garland performances - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Judy_Garland_filmography

    1956. Las Vegas, Nevadaat the New Frontier Hotel. Garland performed a four-week stand for a salary of $55,000 per week, making her the highest-paid entertainer to work in Las Vegas to date. Despite a brief bout of laryngitis, her performances there were so successful that her run was extended an extra week.

  6. Judy Garland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Judy_Garland

    Garland began performing in vaudeville as a child with her two older sisters and was later signed to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer as a teenager. She appeared in more than two dozen films for MGM and is remembered for portraying Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz. Garland was a frequent on-screen partner of both Mickey Rooney and Gene Kelly and regularly collaborated with director and second husband Vincente Minnelli. Other film appearances during this period include roles in Meet Me in St. Louis, The Harve

  7. Judy Garland - Biography - IMDb

    www.imdb.com › name › nm0000023
    • Reviews
    • Early life
    • Later career
    • Early career
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    • Later life
    • Death and legacy

    One of the brightest, most tragic movie stars of Hollywood's Golden Era, Judy Garland was a much-loved character whose warmth and spirit, along with her rich and exuberant voice, kept theatre-goers entertained with an array of delightful musicals.

    She was born Frances Ethel Gumm on 10 June 1922 in Minnesota, the youngest daughter of vaudevillians Ethel Marion (Milne) and Francis Avent Gumm. She was of English, along with some Scottish and Irish, descent. Her mother, an ambitious woman gifted in playing various musical instruments, saw the potential in her daughter at the tender age of just 2 years old when Baby Frances repeatedly sang \\"Jingle Bells\\" until she was dragged from the stage kicking and screaming during one of their Christmas shows and immediately drafted her into a dance act, entitled \\"The Gumm Sisters\\", along with her older sisters Mary Jane Gumm and Virginia Gumm. However, knowing that her youngest daughter would eventually become the biggest star, Ethel soon took Frances out of the act and together they traveled across America where she would perform in nightclubs, cabarets, hotels and theaters solo.

    Tragedy soon followed, however, in the form of her father's death of meningitis in November 1935. Having been given no assignments with the exception of singing on radio, Judy faced the threat of losing her job following the arrival of Deanna Durbin. Knowing that they couldn't keep both of the teenage singers, MGM devised a short entitled Every Sunday (1936) which would be the girls' screen test. However, despite being the outright winner and being kept on by MGM, Judy's career did not officially kick off until she sang one of her most famous songs, \\"You Made Me Love You\\", at Clark Gable's birthday party in February 1937, during which Louis B. Mayer finally paid attention to the talented songstress.

    Prior to this her film debut in Pigskin Parade (1936), in which she played a teenage hillbilly, had left her career hanging in the balance. However, following her rendition of \\"You Made Me Love You\\", MGM set to work preparing various musicals with which to keep Judy busy. All this had its toll on the young teenager, and she was given numerous pills by the studio doctors in order to combat her tiredness on set. Another problem was her weight fluctuation, but she was soon given amphetamines in order to give her the desired streamlined figure. This soon produced the downward spiral that resulted in her lifelong drug addiction.

    Vincente began to mold Judy and her career, making her more beautiful and more popular with audiences worldwide. He directed her in The Clock (1945), and it was during the filming of this movie that the couple announced their engagement on set on 9 January 1945. Judy's divorce from David Rose had been finalized on 8 June 1944 after almost three years of marriage, and despite her brief fling with Orson Welles, who at the time was married to screen sex goddess Rita Hayworth, on 15 June 1945 Judy made Vincente her second husband, tying the knot with him that afternoon at her mother's home with her boss Louis B. Mayer giving her away and her best friend Betty Asher serving as bridesmaid. They spent three months on honeymoon in New York and afterwards Judy discovered that she was pregnant.

    On 12 March 1946 in Los Angeles, California, Judy gave birth to their daughter, Liza Minnelli, via caesarean section. It was a joyous time for the couple, but Judy was out of commission for weeks due to the caesarean and her postnatal depression, so she spent much of her time recuperating in bed. She soon returned to work, but married life was never the same for Vincente and Judy after they filmed The Pirate (1948) together in 1947. Judy's mental health was fast deteriorating and she began hallucinating things and making false accusations toward people, especially her husband, making the filming a nightmare. She also began an affair with aspiring Russian actor Yul Brynner, but after the affair ended, Judy soon regained health and tried to salvage her failing marriage. She then teamed up with dancing legend Fred Astaire for the delightful musical Easter Parade (1948), which resulted in a successful comeback despite having Vincente fired from directing the musical. Afterwards, Judy's health deteriorated and she began the first of several suicide attempts. In May 1949, she was checked into a rehabilitation center, which caused her much distress. She soon regained strength and was visited frequently by her lover Frank Sinatra, but never saw much of Vincente or Liza. On returning, Judy made In the Good Old Summertime (1949), which was also Liza's film debut, albeit via an uncredited cameo. She had already been suspended by MGM for her lack of cooperation on the set of The Barkleys of Broadway (1949), which also resulted in her getting replaced by Ginger Rogers. After being replaced by Betty Hutton on Annie Get Your Gun (1950), Judy was suspended yet again before making her final film for MGM, entitled Summer Stock (1950). At 28, Judy received her third suspension and was fired by MGM, and her second marriage was soon dissolved. Having taken up with Sidney Luft, Judy traveled to London to star at the legendary Palladium. She was an instant success and after her divorce to Vincente Minnelli was finalized on 29 March 1951 after almost six years of marriage, Judy traveled with Sid to New York to make an appearance on Broadway. With her newfound fame on stage, Judy was stopped in her tracks in February 1952 when she became pregnant by her new lover, Sid. At the age of 30, she made him her third husband on 8 June 1952; the wedding was held at a friend's ranch in Pasadena. Her relationship with her mother had long since been dissolved by this point, and after the birth of her second daughter, Lorna Luft, on 21 November 1952, she refused to allow her mother to see her granddaughter. Ethel then died in January 1953 of a heart attack, leaving Judy devastated and feeling guilty about not reconciling with her mother before her untimely demise. After the funeral, Judy signed a film contract with Warner Bros. to star in the musical remake of A Star Is Born (1937), which had starred Janet Gaynor, who had won the first-ever Academy Award for Best Actress in 1929. Filming soon began, resulting in an affair between Judy and her leading man, British star James Mason. She also picked up on her affair with Frank Sinatra, and after filming was complete Judy was yet again lauded as a great film star. She won a Golden Globe for her brilliant and truly outstanding performance as Esther Blodgett, nightclub singer turned movie star, but when it came to the Academy Awards, a distraught Judy lost out on the Best Actress Oscar to Grace Kelly for her portrayal of the wife of an alcoholic star in The Country Girl (1954). Many still argue that Judy should have won the Oscar over Grace Kelly. Continuing her work on stage, Judy gave birth to her beloved son, Joey Luft, on 29 March 1955. She soon began to lose her millions of dollars as a result of her husband's strong gambling addiction, and with hundreds of debts to pay, Judy and Sid began a volatile, on-off relationship resulting in numerous divorce filings.

    In 1961, at the age of 39, Judy returned to her ailing film career, this time to star in Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), for which she received an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress, but this time she lost out to Rita Moreno for her performance in West Side Story (1961). Her battles with alcoholism and drugs led to Judy's making numerous headlines in newspapers, but she soldiered on, forming a close friendship with President John F. Kennedy. In 1963, Judy and Sid finally separated permanently, and on 19 May 1965 their divorce was finalized after almost 13 years of marriage. By this time, Judy, now 41, had made her final performance on film alongside Dirk Bogarde in I Could Go on Singing (1963). She married her fourth husband, Mark Herron, on 14 November 1965 in Las Vegas, but they separated in April 1966 after five months of marriage owing to his homosexuality. It was also that year that she began an affair with young journalist Tom Green. She then settled down in London after their affair ended, and she began dating disk jockey Mickey Deans in December 1968. They became engaged once her divorce from Mark Herron was finalized on 9 January 1969 after three years of marriage. She married Mickey, her fifth and final husband, in a register office in Chelsea, London, on 15 March 1969.

    She continued working on stage, appearing several times with her daughter Liza. It was during a concert in Chelsea, London, that Judy stumbled into her bathroom late one night and died of an overdose of barbiturates, the drug that had dominated her much of her life, on the 22nd of June 1969 at the age of 47. Her daughter Liza Minnelli paid for her funeral, and her former lover James Mason delivered her touching eulogy. She is still an icon to this day with her famous performances in The Wizard of Oz (1939), Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), Easter Parade (1948), and A Star Is Born (1954).

  8. Gerry Conlon — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Gerry_Conlon
    • Biography
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    Gerry Con­lon was born in Belfast and grew up in the im­pov­er­ished but close-knit com­mu­nity of the Lower Falls Road. He de­scribed his child­hood as happy. His fa­ther was Giuseppe Con­lon, a fac­tory worker, and his mother was Sarah Con­lon, a hos­pi­tal cleaner. In 1974, at age 20, Con­lon went to Eng­land to seek work and to es­cape the every­day vi­o­lence he was en­coun­ter­ing on the streets of Belfast. He was liv­ing with a group of squat­ters in Lon­don when he was ar­rested for the Guild­ford pub bomb­ings, which oc­curred on 5 Oc­to­ber the same year. Con­lon, along with fel­low Irish­men Paul Hill and Paddy Arm­strong and Eng­lish­woman Ca­r­ole Richard­son, be­came the so-called Guild­ford Four con­victed on 22 Oc­to­ber 1975 of plant­ing two bombs a year ear­lier in the Sur­rey town of Guild­ford which killed five peo­ple and in­jured dozens more. The four were sen­tenced to life in prison.At their trial the judge told the de­fen­dants, "If hang­ing were still an op...

    Con­lon bat­tled with lung can­cer for a lengthy pe­riod be­fore his death on 21 June 2014 in his na­tive Belfast. He is sur­vived by his sis­ters Ann and Bridie.

  9. Gerry Conlon | Historica Wiki | Fandom

    historica.fandom.com › wiki › Gerry_Conlon

    Gerard "Gerry" Conlon (1 March 1954-21 June 2014) was a Northern Irish man who, along with three other members of the "Guildford Four", was wrongly accused of being a Provisional IRA member during The Troubles. Biography. Gerard Conlon was born in Belfast, County Antrim, Northern Ireland on 1 March 1954, the son of a factory worker and a hospital cleaner.

  10. Guildford Four's Gerry Conlon dies - BBC News

    www.bbc.com › news › uk-northern-ireland-27955555

    Jun 23, 2014 · Gerry Conlon, who was wrongly convicted of the 1974 Guildford IRA pub bombing, has died aged 60 after an illness. He was one of the Guildford Four, who spent 15 years in prison before their...

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