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  1. Godzilla (1954 film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(1954_film)

    Godzilla was theatrically released in Japan on November 3, 1954, and grossed ¥183 million ($1.6 million) during its original theatrical run. In 1956, a heavily re-edited "Americanized" version, titled Godzilla, King of the Monsters! was released in the United States.

    • Takeo Murata, Ishirō Honda
    • Ishirō Honda
  2. Godzilla (1954 movie) - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(1954_movie)

    Godzilla (ゴジラ, Gojira) is a 1954 Japanese science fiction kaiju movie. It was produced by Tomoyuki Tanaka and was directed by Ishirō Honda. The movie was distributed by Toho. It was the first of many kaiju movies that would be released in Japan. The movie is about Godzilla, a giant mutated monster, terrorizing Japan.

  3. Godzilla (franchise) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(franchise)

    The Godzilla (ゴジラ, Gojira) franchise is a Japanese media franchise created and owned by Toho, centered on the fictional kaiju character Godzilla.It is recognized by Guinness World Records to be the longest continuously running movie franchise, having been in ongoing production from 1954 to the present day, with several hiatuses of varying lengths.

    • 1954–present
    • Godzilla
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  5. Godzilla (1954) | Wikizilla, the kaiju encyclopedia

    wikizilla.org/wiki/Godzilla/1954
    • Name
    • Personality
    • Origins
    • Abilities
    • Filmography
    • Video Games
    • Roar
    • Trivia
    • References
    • Comments

    The name "Godzilla" is a transliteration of Gojira (ゴジラ), a combination of two Japanese words: gorira (ゴリラ), meaning gorilla, and kujira(鯨 or クジラ), meaning whale. At one planning stage, the concept of "Gojira" was described as "a cross between a gorilla and a whale." The two words "whale" and "gorilla" describe Godzilla's traditional characteristics. The word whale represents his aquatic lifestyle and his bulky size. The word gorilla represents his sheer strength and the strategic thinking he uses when fighting against other monsters. Since Godzilla is neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name had to be devised in a different way for the original film's story. Godzilla's name was originally spelled in kanji as 呉爾羅 by the Odo Island natives. However, Toho chose these characters for sound only. In Shigeru Kayama's initial story draft for the film, Godzilla's name was instead spelled as Godzira (ゴヂラ). Contrary to popular belief, the English name "Godzilla" was not the idea of the America...

    The 1954 Godzilla is a creature whose underwater habitat was completely destroyed by a hydrogen bomb test which also killed his family and burned and scarred him. Enraged and driven from his home, Godzilla took out his anger upon humanity, destroying any boats that he encountered and later laying waste to the city of Tokyo.

    In the original Godzilla, it is proposed that Godzilla was a type of prehistoric intermediary reptile related to both land and sea reptiles that slept deep underwater for millions of years feeding on deep sea organisms before being disturbed and enhanced by an American hydrogen bomb test. Dr. Yamane proposes that the original Godzilla might have been living among others of his kind prior to the detonation, but the H-bomb completely destroyed his home and drew him out. This idea is supported by official artwork of the 1954 Godzilla living with other Godzillas underwater before a huge explosion destroys his habitat, killing his companions and burning and enraging Godzilla and drawing him to the surface.After the original Godzilla is killed, Yamane proposes that other Godzillas may have survived to the present day and could be awakened by future nuclear tests. This explains how in the various continuities that encompass the series, multiple individual Godzillas have appeared.

    Incandescent light

    Godzilla can exhale a powerful radioactive incandescent light (白熱光, hakunetsu hikari, lit. white-hot light), which takes the form of a white vapor-like smoke that is hot enough to melt metal and also causes raging fires that can spread across entire city blocks.

    Durability

    The original Godzilla displayed an immunity to conventional weaponry, being virtually impervious to everything the JSDF threw at him. Dr. Yamanestates that the very fact Godzilla survived exposure to a hydrogen bomb explosion is a testament to his durability.

    Amphibiousness

    Though technically a reptile and not an amphibian, Godzilla has an amphibious lifestyle. He spends half of his life in water and the other on land. Godzilla is capable of remaining completely submerged underwater for long periods of time, and it is suggested by Kyohei Yamanethat he survived for millions of years living inside a deep underwater cavern. Godzilla's atomic breath is not impeded while underwater, shown when he obliterates boats with it while completely submerged underwater. While...

    Godzilla's roar is a famous sound effect. Over the years, it has changed considerably, sounding different almost every time and having many variations for the different emotions. The sound effects team originally tried to create Godzilla's roar by using animal roars that had been edited. They sampled all kinds of birds and mammals, but nothing seemed to be the right match for the reptile-like noises a monster like Godzilla would make. Akira Ifukube, who was the film's composer, proposed stepping away from using animal samples. He took a string off of his contrabass and rubbed it with gloves soaked in pine tar. The sound that came from it was used as Godzilla's roar. This roar would later be altered for use as the roar of other monsters in the Showa era, including Varan, Baragon and Gorosaurus. Godzilla's roar can be written in readable characters and has been done so in comics, and not only by a simple "roar." In Japanese, the official onomatopoeia for Godzilla's roar is "Gyaoon" (ギ...

    The first and, by extent, second ShowaGodzillas' weights of 20,000 metric tons are said to be equal to that of 5,000 elephants.

    This is a list of references for Godzilla/1954. These citations are used to identify the reliable sources on which this article is based. These references appear inside articles in the form of superscript numbers, which look like this:

    Showing 25 comments. When commenting, please remain respectful of other users, stay on topic, and avoid role-playing and excessive punctuation. Comments which violate these guidelines may be removed by administrators.

    • 50 meters
    • Hydrogen Bomb Giant Monster, (水爆大怪獣 Suibaku Daikaijū), King of the Monsters (怪獣王 Kaijū-Ō)
    • Irradiated Prehistoric Amphibious Reptile
    • 20,000 metric tons
  6. Godzilla (1954 film) | Wikizilla, the kaiju encyclopedia

    wikizilla.org/wiki/Godzilla_(1954_film)

    Nov 03, 2020 · Godzilla (ゴジラ Gojira) is a 1954 tokusatsu kaiju film produced by Toho, and the first installment in the Godzilla series as well as the Showa series. The film was released to Japanese theaters on November 3, 1954, and to American theaters as Godzilla, King of the Monsters! on April 27, 1956.

    • Godzilla, King of the Monsters! (1956)
    • Tomoyuki Tanaka
  7. Godzilla (1954) | Gojipedia, the Godzilla Resource and Wiki

    godzilla.fandom.com/wiki/Godzilla_(1954)
    • Name
    • Appearance
    • Personality
    • Origins
    • History
    • Abilities
    • Anti-Godzilla Weaponry
    • Video Games
    • Trivia
    • List of Appearances

    The name "Godzilla" is a transliteration of Gojira (ゴジラ?), a combination of two Japanese words: gorira (ゴリラ?), meaning gorilla, and kujira(鯨 or クジラ), meaning whale. At one planning stage, the concept of "Gojira" was described as "a cross between a gorilla and a whale." The two words "whale" and "gorilla" describe Godzilla's traditional characteristics. Since Godzilla is neither a gorilla nor a whale, the name had to be devised in a different way for the original film's story. Godzilla's name was originally spelled in kanji as 呉爾羅 by the Odo Islandnatives. However, Toho chose these characters for sound only, as the combined characters mean "give you net." Before Toho sold the film to U.S. distributors, Toho's international division had originally marketed an English-subtitled print under the title of Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, which was shown briefly in Japanese-American theaters. Toho came up with "Godzilla" as an English transliteration of the name "Gojira"."

    ShodaiGoji

    The ShodaiGojidesign is the designation for the 1954 kaiju's design. This suit featured a heavy lower body, small arms and a large, round head. The face had pronounced brows while the eyes were completely round with tiny pupils, a feature unique to this costume. For close-up shots, a hand-held puppet and the prototype suit were used. As a result, when the camera focuses on Godzilla's head in such close-ups, such as when he is firing his atomic breath, Godzilla appears to have larger, more glo...

    Portrayal

    The ShodaiGoji suit was the first of its kind - being fully operated by a man inside of it. As there were no established procedures on how to build or operate a suit like the original Godzilla suit, Godzilla special effects artist Eiji Tsuburaya and the production staff had to pioneer a new technique that would later be known as suitmation. The ShodaiGoji suit and the original pre-ShodaiGoji suit were built by Eizo Kaimai. The ShodaiGoji was portrayed by Haruo Nakajima, who would go to portra...

    Roar

    Godzilla's roar is a famous sound effect. Over the years, it has changed considerably, sounding different almost every time and having many variations for the different emotions. The sound effects team originally tried to create Godzilla's roar by using animal roars that had been edited. They sampled all kinds of birds and mammals, but nothing seemed to be the right match for the reptile-like noises a monster like Godzilla would make. Akira Ifukube, who was the film's composer, proposed stepp...

    Godzilla, in the original Godzilla film, is a creature whose underwater habitat was completely destroyed by a hydrogen bomb test which killed his entire family and left him burned and scarred, ultimately mutating him. Enraged and driven from his home, Godzilla took out his rage upon humanity, destroying any boats that he encountered and later laying waste to the city of Tokyo, sparing no one.

    In the original 1954 Godzilla film, it is proposed that Godzilla was a type of prehistoric intermediary reptile related to both land and sea reptiles that slept deep underwater for millions of years feeding on deep sea organisms before being disturbed and enhanced by an American hydrogen bomb test. Dr.Yamaneproposes that the original Godzilla might have been living among others of his kind prior to the detonation, but the H-bomb completely destroyed his home and drew him out. This idea is supported by official artwork of the 1954 Godzilla living with other Godzillas underwater before a huge explosion destroys his habitat, killing his companions and burning and enraging Godzilla and drawing him out to the surface.

    Although the 1954 Godzilla died in the original Godzillafilm of the Showa era, its fate would later be rewritten in the Millennium series of films.

    Amphibious lifestyle

    Though technically a reptile and not an amphibian, Godzilla has an amphibious lifestyle. He spends half of his life in water and the other on land. He is as adept a fighter underwater as he is on land. Capable of marching on the sea floor or swimming by undulating his tail like a crocodile, Godzilla is displayed as being able to breathe underwater, or occasionally hibernating in the ocean depths between movies.

    Atomic breath

    Godzilla's atomic breath has typically been shown to set entire city blocks ablaze and easily obliterate most military weaponry. Within the events of the 1954 film, his atomic breath was presented as a white, mist-like blast.

    Durability

    Starting in the first Godzilla film, Godzilla displayed an immunity to conventional weaponry, virtually impervious to everything the JSDF threw at him. Dr. Yamanestates that the very fact Godzilla survived exposure to a hydrogen bomb explosion is a testament to his durability.

    Due to Godzilla's size, super-strength and regenerative abilities, he is invulnerable to most forms of conventional attack. During the 1954 film, a powerful weapon is revealed and used upon Godzilla to finally kill him and end his reign of terror.

    The 1954 Godzilla appeared within the mobile title Monster Strikeas a playable character.

    In the Wii version of the game, Godzilla 2000 is the only incarnation that can be played in story mode. Godzilla 1954 and Godzilla 1990's are only playable in Brawl mode, although Godzilla 1990's is playable in story mode in the PlayStation 2 version of the game.

    The 1954 Godzilla made an appearance within the Kaiju Collectionmobile title.

    This is the only known Godzilla to have been brown since all future incarnations of the Godzilla and its suits were charcoal black, and much later, green.
    The ShodaiGoji suit was 6.5 feet tall and weighed 200 pounds.
    In the 2002 film Godzilla Against Mechagodzilla, the ShodaiGoji design is replicated in part through CGI. Shinichi Wakasa's Monsters, Inc. also created a prop for some of the new footage of the ori...
    The ShodaiGoji heavily influenced later Godzilla designs, most noticeably the 84Goji, SokogekiGoji, the 2016 design utilized in Shin Godzilla, and the updated MonsterVerse Godzilla utilised in Godz...

    Video games

    1. Godzilla Generations 2. Godzilla: Trading Battle 3. Godzilla: Unleashed 4. Monster Strike 5. Godzilla (2014 video game) (Kaiju guide) 6. Godzilla: Kaiju Collection

    Novels

    1. Godzilla: King of the Monsters

  8. Godzilla (film din 1954) - Wikipedia

    ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(film_din_1954)

    De la Wikipedia, enciclopedia liberă Afișul original al filmului Godzilla (ゴジラ Gojira) este un film SF Kaijū japonez din 1954 regizat de Ishirō Honda pentru compania Toho. În rolurile principale joacă actorii Akira Takarada, Momoko Kôchi, Takashi Shimura.

  9. Godzilla (1954) | Horror Film Wiki | Fandom

    horror.fandom.com/wiki/Godzilla_(1954)
    • Plot
    • Cast
    • Themes
    • Production
    • Story
    • Design
    • Filming
    • External Links

    When the Japanese freighter Eiko-maru is destroyed near Odo Island, another ship – the Bingo-maru– is sent to investigate, only to meet the same fate with few survivors. A fishing boat from Odo is also destroyed, with one survivor. Fishing catches mysteriously drop to zero, blamed by an elder on the ancient sea creature known as "Godzilla". Reporters arrive on Odo Island to further investigate. A villager tells one of the reporters that "something large is going crazy down there", ruining the fishing. That evening, a ritual dance to appease Godzilla is held during which the reporter learns that the locals used to sacrifice young girls to the monster. That night, a large storm strikes the island, destroying the reporters' helicopter, and Godzilla, though very briefly seen, destroys 17 homes, kills nine people and 20 of the villagers' livestock. Odo residents travel to Tokyo to demand disaster relief. The villagers' and reporters' evidence describes damage consistent with something la...

    Akira Takarada as Hideto Ogata (尾形 秀人 Ogata Hideto)
    Momoko Kōchi as Emiko Yamane (山根 恵美子 Yamane Emiko)
    Akihiko Hirata as Daisuke Serizawa (芹沢 大助 Serizawa Daisuke)
    Takashi Shimura as Dr. Kyohei Yamane (山根恭平 Yamane Kyōhei)

    In the film, Godzilla is represented as a symbol for nuclear holocaust and ever since the film's initial release, Godzilla has been culturally identified as a strong metaphor for nuclear weapons. In the film, Godzilla's attack mirrors the same horrors the Japanese experienced near the end of World War II, with the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Producer Tomoyuki Tanaka stated that, "The theme of the film, from the beginning, was the terror of the bomb. Mankind had created the bomb, and now nature was going to take revenge on mankind." Director Ishirō Honda filmed Godzilla's rampage on Tokyo with the mentality that the monster's onslaught was a parallel and physical manifestation of an Atom bomb attack. He stated, "If Godzilla had been a dinosaur or some other animal, he would have been killed by just one cannonball. But if he were equal to an atomic bomb, we wouldn't know what to do. So, I took the characteristics of an atomic bomb and applied them to Godzilla. Though Go...

    The opening scene of the Eiko Maru being obliterated by Godzilla's first attack and later scenes of survivors of other attacks being found with radiation burns, were inspired by the U.S. testing of a hydrogen bomb on Bikini Atoll. A real Japanese fishing ship, the Lucky Dragon 5, was overwhelmed when the U.S. Castle Bravo nuclear test had a yield of 15 megatons rather than the planned 6 megatons. Military personnel, island natives and several Lucky Dragon 5 crew members, persons believed to be in a zone of safety, suffered from radiation sickness and at least one died six months later. This created widespread fear of uncontrolled and unpredictable nuclear weapons, which the film makers symbolized with Godzilla. The actual event played a major role in drawing attention to the hazards of nuclear fallout, and concerns were widespread about radioactively contaminated fish affecting the Japanese food supply. Godzilla's climactic attack on Tokyo was meant to exemplify a rolling nuclear at...

    The film went through several different drafts. Science fiction and horror novelist Shigeru Kayama was hired to write the original story. The screenplay was written by Takeo Murata and Ishiro Honda. In Kayama's draft, originally entitled Kaitei ni-man mairu kara kita daikaijû (lit. "The Giant Monster from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea"), and then later renamed G-Sakuhun (lit. Project G, with the G standing for the English word for Giant), Dr. Yamane was the antagonist and was seen as a mad scientist wearing a cape who lived in a gothic style house. Godzilla's first appearance was to have him rise from the sea at night and destroy a light house. This was an obvious homage to The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. Murata and Honda altered and changed a few things from Kayama's draft and added new elements, like the love triangle between Emiko, Ogata, and Dr. Serizawa. Dr. Yamane was changed from a mad scientist to an acclaimed paleontologist who seeks to study Godzilla rather than destroy him....

    The monster story itself had been necessitated by an emergency. The producers had planned a completely different film, but that project had fallen apart. Toho demanded a film, any film, within a short time. During an airplane ride, producer Tomoyuki Tanaka had read of the Lucky Dragon incident, and was inspired. The monster angle was derived from the success of Warner Bros.' 1953 film The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms. It was then that the creation of the monsters' design began to take place, beginning with the film's special effects director, Eiji Tsuburaya's original suggestion of the monster being a giant octopus, the monster design later went several variations and features such as a hideous disportionate ape-like creature with head shaped like a mushroom, recalling the suggested references of mushroom clouds. In the end, the filmmakers eventually settled on a dinosaur-like monster that was a cross of a Tyrannosaurus Rex, an Iguanadon, a Stegosaurus, and a fire-breathing dragon.

    Toho Studios had balked at the suggestion of filming Godzilla in color. Ironically, the cheaper black-and-white film had actually enhanced the special effects (e.g. hiding wires and other things in the shadows), and otherwise adding to the overall chill of Godzilla's nighttime attacks. Two years later, Toho would film Rodan in color, which it would subsequently use in nearly all its giant-monster films. For a special effects shoot for the movie, Nakajima, who was inside the Godzilla suit, was placed in a swimming pool. Someone accidentally sent electrical charges through the pool. Masaaki Tachibana (an announcer of a scene in a steel tower) painted his face with olive oil to express that he was sweating with fear. There were many scenes filmed that were not used, but most have not been recovered. The best known example was the scene that was meant to replace the iconic appearance of Godzilla on Odo Island. Originally, Godzilla arrives holding a dead cow in his mouth, but the effect...

    Godzilla (1954 film) at Wikipedia
    Godzilla (1954) at Rotten Tomatoes
    Godzilla (1954) at the Internet Movie Database
    Godzilla (1954) at AllMovie
    • Ishirô Honda
    • November 3, 1954
    • Japanese
    • 95 min
  10. Godzilla, a giant 50 meter kaiju created by the radioactivity from an H-bomb test, attacks Japan and completely destroys the country's capital city of Tokyo. The beast is finally killed by the Oxygen Destroyer, a device invented by Daisuke Serizawa.

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