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  1. Grace M. Cho An engrossing encounter with lingering ghosts of the Korean War Through intellectual vigor, Haunting the Korean Diaspora explores the repressed history of emotional and physical violence between the United States and Korea and the unexamined reverberations of sexual relationships between Korean women and American soldiers.

  2. Grace M. Cho Haunting the Korean Diaspora Paperback – December 2, 2008 by Grace M. Cho (Author) 18 ratings See all formats and editions Kindle $16.19 Read with Our Free App Hardcover $47.78 2 Used from $47.78 Paperback $22.50 11 Used from $17.24 19 New from $21.70

    • (18)
    • University of Minnesota Press
    • Grace M. Cho
    • 2008
  3. Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call “transgenerational haunting.”

    • (18)
  4. Grace M. Cho exposes how Koreans in the United States have been profoundly affected by the forgotten war and uncovers the silences and secrets that still surround it, arguing that trauma memories have been passed unconsciously through a process psychoanalysts call “transgenerational haunting.”

  5. Jan 01, 2008 · Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War by Grace M. Cho (Goodreads Author) 4.14 · Rating details · 134 ratings · 13 reviews Since the Korean War--the forgotten war--more than a million Korean women have acted as sex workers for U.S. servicemen. More than 100,000 women married GIs and moved to the United States.

    • (14)
    • Paperback
  6. Mar 02, 2010 · Haunting the Korean Diaspora: Shame, Secrecy, and the Forgotten War. By Grace Cho. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009. 232 pp. 22.50 (paper). - Volume 69 Issue 1

  7. that Cho adapts to link and explore these issues is the concept of transgenerational haunting, established by Nicholas Abraham and Maria Torok, whose work on the Holocaust influences Cho’s project. “I want to offer the Korean diaspora in the United States as another site of transgenerational haunting,” Cho observes (11).

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