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  1. The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), also known as the gurry shark, grey shark, or by the Kalaallisut name eqalussuaq, is a large shark of the family Somniosidae ("sleeper sharks"), closely related to the Pacific and southern sleeper sharks.

    Greenland shark - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland_shark
    • Oldest Shark in the World - 512 Year Old Greenland Shark
      Oldest Shark in the World - 512 Year Old Greenland Shark
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  2. Greenland shark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland_shark

    The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus), also known as the gurry shark, grey shark, or by the Kalaallisut name eqalussuaq, is a large shark of the family Somniosidae ("sleeper sharks"), closely related to the Pacific and southern sleeper sharks.

  3. Greenland shark | Size, Age, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/animal/Greenland-shark

    Greenland shark, (Somniosus microcephalus), member of the sleeper shark family Somniosidae (order Squaliformes, which also includes the dogfish family, Squalidae) that is the longest-living vertebrate known.

  4. 9 Facts about the Greenland Shark - Oceanwide Expeditions

    oceanwide-expeditions.com/blog/8-facts-about-the...
    • Greenland sharks are really, really big. If you are looking for a Greenland shark, it is important to have a good understanding of their physical dimensions.
    • The meat of a Greenland shark is poisonous. Greenland shark meat can cause symptoms in humans similar to severe inebriation, and the neurotoxins in their flesh can even be incapacitating to sled dogs.
    • Greenland sharks do not attack humans. There are some early Inuit legends that claim Greenland sharks have attacked numerous kayaks, but the reality is that there is not one documented case of such an encounter.
    • Swimming unseen is a Greenland shark talent. It is understandable that people who take Greenland cruises may want to see Greenland sharks, but in fact the odds are rather low.
  5. Greenland Shark - Oceana

    oceana.org/marine-life/sharks-rays/greenland-shark

    Reaching lengths of 24 feet (7.3 m) and weights of 2200 pounds (1000 kg), the Greenland shark is one of the largest sharks in the ocean. Though both large and predatory, this species is not known to be particularly aggressive and is thought to be fairly sluggish in the cold waters of the north Atlantic Ocean.

  6. The Greenland Shark Although Greenland sharks are not typically aggressive, they are most definitely some of the largest sharks on the planet. While quite a bit of mystery remains regarding this enormous and elusive fish, we have still been able to learn some interesting facts.

  7. 10 Interesting Facts About The Greenland Shark

    www.sharksider.com/10-interesting-facts...
    • Greenland Sharks Love Cold Water. Greenland Sharks are the only true sub-Arctic shark and they live in cold waters of the North Atlantic around Iceland, Greenland, and Canada year round.
    • Greenland Sharks Can And Will Eat Anything. Greenland Sharks have a voracious appetite and will eat almost anything. Typically they eat eels, lumpfish, flounder, and other small sharks, but they will also eat carrion, the meat of dead animals.
    • Greenland Sharks Live A Very Long Time. Some scientists estimate that Greenland Sharks can live around 200 years. This is based on the growth rate of the sharks.
    • Greenland Sharks Swim Very Slowly. Greenland Sharks are part of the Sleeper Shark family. Species of sharks in the Sleeper Sharks are named so because they tend to swim incredibly slowly.
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  9. Is This Greenland Shark Nearly 400 Years Old?

    www.snopes.com/fact-check/greenland-shark-392...

    Aug 21, 2020 · A viral picture depicted a Greenland shark believed to be 392 years old. The shark featured in the image is indeed a Greenland shark, a long-lived Arctic species that was the subject of a 2016 ...

  10. No, Scientists Haven't Found a 512-Year-Old Greenland Shark ...

    www.livescience.com/61210-shark-not-512-years...
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    Headlines circulating on the internet today (Dec. 14) breathlessly described the discovery of a 512-year-old shark but they're a little off the mark.

    Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) are native to the Arctic and North Atlantic, and can grow to be up to 24 feet (7 meters) long and weigh up to 2,645 pounds (1,200 kilograms), according to the Greenland Shark and Elasmobranch Education and Research Group (GEERG). They are slow-moving fish, cruising at about 1 foot per second (0.3 meters/second), and reaching depths of 9,101 feet (2,774 m), GEERG reported.

    For some shark species, scientists use bony structures such as calcified vertebrae to track their age, reading rings that form in the hardened tissue as the shark ages. But Greenland sharks are \\"soft sharks\\" whose vertebrae don't harden enough to form telltale age markers, so scientists needed a new method to determine how old the sharks were, Julius Nielsen, author of the 2016 study about the sharks, told Live Science that year.

    The scientists used radiocarbon dating to measure carbon isotopes absorbed by Greenland sharks' eye tissue, working with sharks that were captured as bycatch, the study authors reported.

    \\"It's important to keep in mind there's some uncertainty with this estimate,\\" Nielsen said. \\"But even the lowest part of the age range at least 272 years still makes Greenland sharks the longest-living vertebrate known to science.\\"

    As long-lived as they may be, Greenland sharks don't even come close to the longevity of hydra freshwater polyps. These unassuming-looking invertebrates continuously regenerate their own cells, and are thought to be able to live forever under the right conditions.

    Creatures that swim the ocean depths are notoriously difficult to observe in their natural habitat, and there is still much to be learned about many species that have been known to science for decades and Greenland sharks are no exception, Nielsen told Live Science in 2016.

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