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      • – William Shakespeare (“Quote from King Henry V”) “We few, we happy few, we band of brothers. For he today that sheds his blood with me, Shall be my brother; be ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition.
      www.military-quotes.com/william-shakespeare.htm#:~:text=– William Shakespeare (“Quote from King Henry V”),so vile, This day shall gentle his condition.
  1. Famous Quotations from Shakespeare's Henry V

    www.shakespeare-online.com/quotes/henryvquotes.html

    Famous Quotations from Henry V. O! for a Muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention! A kingdom for a stage, princes to act And monarchs to behold the swelling scene. (Chorus.1) Can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? (Chorus.11)

  2. Henry V: Important Quotes Explained | SparkNotes

    www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/henryv/quotes

    Quote 1. And tell the pleasant Prince this mock of his. Hath turned his balls to gunstones, and his soul. Shall stand sore chargèd for the wasteful vengeance. That shall fly from them—for many a thousand widows. Shall this his mock mock out of their dear husbands, Mock mothers from their sons, mock castles down; . . .

  3. Henry V: Important Quotes Explained, page 5 | SparkNotes

    www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/henryv/quotes/page/5

    Henry V Quote 5 I think it is een Macedon where Alexander is porn. I tell you, captain, if you look in the maps of the world I warrant you sall find, in the comparisons between Macedon and Monmouth, that the situations, look you, is both alike.

  4. Henry V: Important Quotes Explained, page 3 | SparkNotes

    www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/henryv/quotes/page/3

    Quote 3. ‘Tis not the balm, the sceptre, and the ball, The sword, the mace, the crown imperial, The intertissued robe of gold and pearl, The farcèd title running fore the king, The throne he sits on, nor the tide of pomp. That beats upon the high shore of this world—. No, not all these, thrice-gorgeous ceremony,

  5. Understanding Shakespeare’s Henry V Through Key Quotations

    www.teachwire.net/news/understanding-shakespeare...

    His jest will savour but of shallow wit. When thousands weep more than did laugh at it.”. (Act 1, Scene 2, lines 295/8) Henry’s response to the Dauphin’s gift of tennis balls, alluding to his misspent youth, shows his anger at being mocked.

  6. On the eve of battle King Henry V goes secretly amongst his own soldiers and is challenged by two of them about the morality of going to war: King Henry: I dare say you love him not so ill to wish him here alone, howsoever you speak this to feel other men’s minds. Methinks I could not die any where so contented as in the king’s company, his cause being just and his quarrel honourable.

  7. William Shakespeare Quotes - The Quotations Page

    www.quotationspage.com/quotes/William_Shakespeare/121

    William Shakespeare, "King Henry V", Act 3 scene 1 Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more, Or close the wall up with our English dead! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility; But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger: Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood.

  8. The Duke of Burgundy asks the Kings of France and England why “gentle peace” should not be allowed to return France to its former prosperity (1599) In Henry V Shakespeare (1564-1616) has the Duke of Burgundy make an impassioned speech to the Kings of France and England, whose war for control of northern France has so devastated the countryside, in which he asks them why “the naked, poor, and mangled Peace” should not be restored in order to “expel these inconveniences, And bless us ...

  9. William Shakespeare Quotes - The Quotations Page

    www.quotationspage.com/quotes/William_Shakespeare/361

    But thought's the slave of life, and life time's fool. William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part I, Act V, sc. 4. - More quotations on: [Thoughts] See what a ready tongue suspicion hath! William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part II, Act I, sc. 1. O sleep, O gentle sleep, nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, that thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down, and steep my senses in forgetfulness.

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