Yahoo Web Search

  1. Illustration of "Hey Diddle Diddle", a well-known nursery rhyme A nursery rhyme is a traditional poem or song for children in Britain and many other countries, but usage of the term only dates from the late 18th/early 19th century.

    Nursery rhyme - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nursery_rhyme
  2. Hey Diddle Diddle - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Diddle_Diddle

    "Hey Diddle Diddle" (also "Hi Diddle Diddle", "The Cat and the Fiddle", or "The Cow Jumped Over the Moon") is an English nursery rhyme. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 19478.

    • Lyrics and music

      A common modern version of the rhyme is Hey Diddle, Diddle!...

    • Origins

      The rhyme may date back to at least the sixteenth century....

    • Meaning

      There are numerous theories about the origin of the rhyme,...

  3. The Man in the Moon Stayed Up Too Late - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_in_the_Moon_Stayed...

    The Man in the Moon Stayed Up Too Late is J. R. R. Tolkien's imagined original ditty behind the nursery rhyme "Hey Diddle Diddle (The Cat and the Fiddle)", invented by back formation. The title of the extended 1962 version is given in The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. It was first published in Yorkshire Poetry in 1923.

  4. Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, My Son John - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diddle,_Diddle,_Dumpling...

    "Diddle, Diddle, Dumpling, My Son John" is an English language nursery rhyme.It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 19709.

  5. Nursery rhyme - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nursery_rhyme

    Illustration of "Hey Diddle Diddle", a well-known nursery rhyme A nursery rhyme is a traditional poem or song for children in Britain and many other countries, but usage of the term only dates from the late 18th/early 19th century.

  6. People also ask

    What is the origin of Hey Diddle Diddle?

    Who wrote Hey Diddle Diddle?

    What does Diddle Diddle Dumpling my son John mean?

    What is the origin of the song Deedle Diddle Dumpling?

  7. Hey Diddle Diddle (disambiguation) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Diddle_Diddle...

    Hey Diddle Diddle is a well-known English nursery rhyme. Hey Diddle Diddle may also refer to: Hey Diddle Diddle, a 1976 album by Play School; Hey-Diddle-Diddle, and Baby Hunting, an 1882 picture book by Randolph Caldecott; Hey Diddle Diddle, a 1937 play by Bartlett Cormack "Hey Diddle Diddle", an episode of the television series Teletubbies

  8. Play School (Australian TV series) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hey_Diddle_Diddle_(album)

    Hey Diddle Diddle (1976) Hickory Dickory (1978) Humpty Dumpty (1981) Wiggerly Woo (1984) There's a Bear in There (1987)...It's Play School (1991) The Best of Play School (1993) Oomba Baroomba (1994) Play School Favourites (1996) In The Car (1997) Hullabaloo (1999) Favourite Play School Nursery Rhymes (2002) Hip Hip Hooray (2002) Sing-a-Long ...

  9. A nursery rhyme is a traditional poem for young children. The term has been used since the 18th century or early 19th century. In North America, the term Mother Goose Rhymes, first used in the mid-18th century, is often used. Examples of nursery rhymes are "Three Blind Mice", "Jack and Jill" and "Hey Diddle Diddle".

  10. The History of Hey Diddle Diddle - Nursery Rhymes For Babies

    nurseryrhymesforbabies.com/hey-diddle-diddle-history

    Sep 09, 2017 · They can play a new dance called hey-diddle-diddle.” And in another play in 1597 written by Alexander Montgomerie, he writes: “But since ye think’t an easy thing, To mount above the moon, Of your own fiddle take a spring, And dance when ye have done.” From 1765, it is where we’ve seen the Hey Diddle Diddle rhyme come together.

  11. The Man in the Moon Stayed Up Too Late - Lord of the Rings Wiki

    lotr.fandom.com/wiki/The_Man_in_the_Moon_Stayed...
    • History
    • Form
    • Behind The Scenes
    • Portrayal in Adaptations
    • See Also
    • References

    In the Inn at Bree, Frodo jumps on a table and recites this song, only referred to as "a ridiculous song invented by Bilbo".

    There follows the tale, in thirteen ballad-like five-line stanzas, introducing each element in turn: "the Man in the Moon" himself, the ostler's "tipsy cat/that plays a five-stringed fiddle", the little dog, the "hornédcow". As with many ballads of this form, it scans rather well to the tune of the theme from "Gilligan's Island." Which can be played to the guitar line of "Stairway to Heaven." Such are the dangers of the folk form.

    According to Tolkien, this poem survived to "our time" in the form of the simplified nursery rhyme "Hey Diddle Diddle". "Here it is in full," said Tolkien. "Only a few words of it are now, as a rule, remembered." At the climactic moment Note that the cow is able to jump over the Moon with ease because the Man in the Moon has temporarily brought it down to Earth. Part of Tolkien's brilliance in establishing the epicmood is his ability to introduce a version of a familiar saying and give the reader a sense of hearing the old proverb afresh, as if spoken for the first time, in the heat of the moment.

    The Hobbit film trilogy

    In The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Bofur sings a revised version of this song whilst eating in Rivendell. The song's lyrics are as follows:

    Tilion, the Maia of the Moon
    Arien, the Maia of the Sun

    ↑ The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, Book One, Chapter IX: "At the Sign of the Prancing Pony"

  12. People also search for