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  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/.../Rocky-Mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, form of tick-borne typhus first described in the Rocky Mountain section of the United States, caused by a specific microorganism (Rickettsia rickettsii). Discovery of the microbe of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in 1906 by H.T. Ricketts led to the understanding of other

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) has been a nationally notifiable condition since the 1920s. As of January 1, 2010, cases of RMSF are reported under a new category called Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis (SFR). This category captures cases of RMSF, Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis, Pacific Coast tick fever, and rickettsialpox.

  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache , which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash . [3] The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. [10]

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  4. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a bacterial infection transmitted by a tick. Without prompt treatment, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause serious damage to internal organs, such as your kidneys and heart.Although it was first identified in the Rocky Mountains, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is most commonly found in the southeastern part of the United States. It also occurs in parts of Canada, Mexico, Central America and South America.Early signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Although many people become ill within the first week after infection, signs and symptoms may not appear for up to 14 days. Initial signs and symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever often are nonspecific and can mimic those of other illnesses: 1. High fever 2. Chills 3. Severe headache 4. Muscle aches 5. Nausea and vomiting 6. Confusion or other neurological changes

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by infection with the organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Ticks carrying R. rickettsii are the most common source of infection.If an infected tick attaches itself to your skin and feeds on your blood for six to 10 hours, you may pick up the infection. But you may never see the tick on you.Rocky Mountain spotted fever primarily occurs when ticks are most active and during warm weather when people tend to spend more time outdoors. Rocky Mountain spotted fever...

    Factors that may increase your risk of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever include: 1. Living in an area where the disease is common 2. The time of year — infections are more common in the spring and early summer 3. How much time you spend in grassy or wooded areas 4. Whether you have a dog or spend time with dogsIf an infected tick attaches to your skin, you can contract Rocky Mountain spotted fever when you remove it, as fluid from the tick can enter your body through an opening such a...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever damages the lining of your smallest blood vessels, causing the vessels to leak or form clots. This may cause: 1. Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). In addition to severe headaches, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation of the brain, which can cause confusion, seizures and delirium. 2. Inflammation of the heart or lungs. Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation in areas of the heart and lungs. This can lead to heart failure or lung f...

    You can decrease your chances of contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever by taking some simple precautions: 1. Wear long pants and sleeves. When walking in wooded or grassy areas, wear shoes, long pants tucked into socks and long-sleeved shirts. Try to stick to trails and avoid walking through low bushes and long grass. 2. Use insect repellents. Products containing DEET (Off! Deep Woods, Repel) often repel ticks. Be sure to follow the instructions on the label. Clothing that has permethrin i...

  5. History of Rocky Mountain Labs (RML) | NIH: National ...

    www.niaid.nih.gov/about/rocky-mountain-history

    Three interesting reads on the story of early spotted fever research and the origins of the Rocky Mountain Laboratories are: Fighting Spotted Fever In the Rockies by Ester Gaskins Price, Naegele Printing Company, 1947; Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, History of a Twentieth-Century Disease by Victoria A. Harden, Johns Hopkins University Press ...

  6. Historical Topographic Maps - Preserving the Past

    www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/ngp/topo-maps/...

    In 2009, USGS began the release of a new generation of topographic maps in electronic form, and in 2011, complemented them with the release of high-resolution scans of more than 178,000 historical topographic maps of the United States. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for everyday use in government, science, industry, land ...

  7. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Fact Sheet

    www.health.pa.gov/topics/Documents/Diseases and...

    What is Rocky Mountain Spotted fever (RMSF)? - RMSF is a severe disease resulting from infection by Rickettsia rickettsii, a bacterium that is transmitted vertically from the female tick to her offspring. 2. Where does RMSF infection occur in Pennsylvania? - Rocky Mountain spotted fever is found throughout the continental United States with ...

  8. MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous

    mormonhistoricsites.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NJ9.2...

    MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous The cause of mountain fever has been debated for years, but this query has additional interest because of the sesquicentennial year of the arrival of the Mormon pioneers in the Salt Lake Valley. Indeed, one may ask what effect this disease had on the 1847 Mormon pioneer companies.

  9. Kinsa "health map" shows fever rates decreasing virtually ...

    hotair.com/archives/allahpundit/2020/03/25/kinsa...

    Mar 25, 2020 · But the falling fever rates on the Kinsa map could be partially explained by many more people than we realize having already contracted the disease and now reached the recovery stage. Two questions, though: 1. If the virus spreads like lightning, why weren’t more people quarantined on cruise ships infected?

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