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  1. Q fever was made a nationally notifiable disease in the United States in 1999. CDC compiles the number of cases reported by state and local health departments and reports national trends. The number of Q fever cases reported to CDC increased, from 19 cases reported in 2000, to 173 cases reported in 2007.

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_spotted_fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a bacterial disease spread by ticks. It typically begins with a fever and headache , which is followed a few days later with the development of a rash . [3] The rash is generally made up of small spots of bleeding and starts on the wrists and ankles. [10]

    • 2 to 14 days after infection
    • Early: Fever, headache, Later: Rash
  3. Rocky Mountain spotted fever - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/rocky...

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever damages the lining of your smallest blood vessels, causing the vessels to leak or form clots. This may cause: Inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). In addition to severe headaches, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause inflammation of the brain, which can cause confusion, seizures and delirium.

  4. Rocky Mountain spotted fever | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/.../Rocky-Mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever, form of tick-borne typhus first described in the Rocky Mountain section of the United States, caused by a specific microorganism (Rickettsia rickettsii). Discovery of the microbe of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in 1906 by H.T. Ricketts led to the understanding of other

  5. Regions where ticks live | Ticks | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/ticks/geographic_distribution.html

    Apr 02, 2020 · Transmits: Rocky Mountain spotted fever (in the southwestern U.S. and along the U.S.-Mexico border). Comments: Dogs are the primary host for the brown dog tick in each of its life stages, but the tick may also bite humans or other mammals.

  6. History of Rocky Mountain Labs (RML) | NIH: National ...

    www.niaid.nih.gov/about/rocky-mountain-history

    During World War II, the laboratory joined in the war effort by becoming a "national vaccine factory," producing vaccines to protect soldiers against spotted fever, typhus, and yellow fever. After the war, work at the lab returned to its primary mission of basic scientific research of infectious diseases.

  7. A Cultural History of the Fever - The Atlantic

    www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/09/...

    Sep 16, 2015 · Fever is a mighty engine which nature brings into the world to the conquest of her enemies,” wrote the English physician Thomas Sydenham in the 1660s. Today, fevers are common as ever, but ...

  8. Typhus, series of acute infectious diseases that appear with a sudden onset of headache, chills, fever, and general pains, proceed on the third to fifth day with a rash and toxemia (toxic substances in the blood), and terminate after two or three weeks. Learn more about typhus in this article.

  9. MOUNTAIN FEVER IN THE 1847 MORMON PIONEER COMPANIES Jay A. Aldous

    mormonhistoricsites.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/NJ9.2...

    The term mountain fever is apparently a catch-all term referred to in many western histories. One histori- cal writer, George Stewart, speaks of this condition as "that vague disease called 'mountain fever,' which seems to have meant any fever you had when you were in the mountains."l Additionally, Dr. Ralph T. Richards, in his

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever - NORD (National Organization ...

    rarediseases.org/.../rocky-mountain-spotted-fever

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is considered the most potentially severe form of the spotted fevers. The onset of symptoms typically occurs approximately two to 14 days (with an average of seven days) after having been bitten by a tick carrying the R. rickettsii bacterium.