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  1. HOLE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/hole

    hole definition: 1. an empty space in an object, usually with an opening to the object's surface, or an opening that…. Learn more.

  2. Hole - definition of hole by The Free Dictionary

    www.thefreedictionary.com/hole

    Define hole. hole synonyms, hole pronunciation, hole translation, English dictionary definition of hole. an opening in something or an unoccupied space; a playing ...

  3. BORE | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/bore

    bore definition: 1. to talk or act in a way that makes someone lose interest: 2. to make someone feel very bored…. Learn more.

  4. Phrase and Idiom Dictionary - Writing Explained

    writingexplained.org/idiom-dictionary

    Hit the Ground Running To Hit it Off Hit the Skids Hit a Snag Hitch a Ride Hoisted by Your Petard Honest to a Fault Honesty is the Best Policy Honor Among Thieves Hot Off the Press A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand A House of Cards A House of Ill Repute How Now Brown Cow Hung Out to Dry Hunker Down (I) I Figured as Much I Should Be So ...

  5. Square peg in a round hole - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_peg_in_a_round_hole

    "Square peg in a round hole" is an idiomatic expression which describes the unusual individualist who could not fit into a niche of their society.. The metaphor was originated by Sydney Smith in "On the Conduct of the Understanding", one of a series of lectures on moral philosophy that he delivered at the Royal Institution in 1804–06:

  6. Idiom Definition. An idiom is a phrase or an expression that has a figurative, or sometimes literal meaning. An idiom’s figurative meaning is different from the literal meaning. Idioms are things that people say or write that when taken literally, don’t make sense.

  7. Going forward - definition of going forward by The Free ...

    www.thefreedictionary.com/going+forward

    a. To extend between two points or in a certain direction; run: curtains that go from the ceiling to the floor.

  8. Hoist with his own petard - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoist_with_his_own_petard

    "Hoist with his own petard" is a phrase from a speech in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet that has become proverbial. The phrase's meaning is literally that a bomb-maker is blown up ("hoist" off the ground) by his own bomb (a "petard" is a small explosive device), and indicates an ironic reversal, or poetic justice.

  9. 2,000 Phrases and Sayings - all explained

    www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/phrases-and-sayings...

    Hit the ground running. Hit the hay. Hit the nail on the head. Hither and yon. Hobson's choice. Hobby-horse. Hocus pocus. Hoi polloi. Hoist with your own petard. Hoity-toity (Can't) hold a candle to. Hold your horses. Home is where the heart is. Homonyms. Honesty is the best policy. Honey catches more flies than vinegar. Hooray Henry. Horse and ...

  10. Pit | Definition of Pit at Dictionary.com

    www.dictionary.com/browse/pit

    Pit definition, a naturally formed or excavated hole or cavity in the ground: pits caused by erosion; clay pits. See more.

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