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  1. Hominidae - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hominidae

    The Hominidae (/ h ɒ ˈ m ɪ n ɪ d iː /), whose members are known as great apes or hominids (/ ˈ h ɒ m ɪ n ɪ d z /), are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean, Sumatran and Tapanuli orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo; and Homo, of which only modern humans remain.

    • Evolution and Taxonomy
    • Physical Description
    • Legal Status
    • Conservation
    • External Links

    In the early Miocene, about 22 mil­lion years ago, there were many species of ar­bo­re­ally adapted prim­i­tive ca­tarrhines from East Africa; the va­ri­ety sug­gests a long his­tory of prior di­ver­si­fi­ca­tion. Fos­sils at 20 mil­lion years ago in­clude frag­ments at­trib­uted to Vic­to­ri­ap­ithe­cus, the ear­li­est Old World mon­key. Among the gen­era thought to be in the ape lin­eage lead­ing up to 13 mil­lion years ago are Pro­con­sul, Rang­wap­ithe­cus, Den­drop­ithe­cus, Limno­p­ithe­cus, Na­cholap­ithe­cus, Equa­to­rius, Nyan­za­p­ithe­cus, Afro­p­ithe­cus, He­lio­p­ithe­cus, and Kenyap­ithe­cus, all from East Africa. At sites far dis­tant from East Africa, the pres­ence of other gen­er­al­ized non-cer­co­p­ithe­cids, that is, non-mon­key pri­mates, of mid­dle Miocene age—Otavip­ithe­cus from cave de­posits in Namibia, and Piero­lap­ithe­cus and Dry­op­ithe­cus from France, Spain and Aus­tria—is fur­ther ev­i­dence of a wide di­ver­sity of an­ces­tral ape forms across Afri...

    The great apes are large, tail­less pri­mates, with the small­est liv­ing species being the bonobo at 30–40 kilo­grams in weight, and the largest being the east­ern go­ril­las, with males weigh­ing 140–180 kilo­grams. In all great apes, the males are, on av­er­age, larger and stronger than the fe­males, al­though the de­gree of sex­ual di­mor­phism varies greatly among species. Al­though most liv­ing species are pre­dom­i­nantly quadrupedal, they are all able to use their hands for gath­er­ing food or nest­ing ma­te­ri­als, and, in some cases, for tool use. Most species are om­niv­o­rous,[citation needed] but fruit is the pre­ferred food among all but some human groups. Chim­panzees and orang­utans pri­mar­ily eat fruit. When go­ril­las run short of fruit at cer­tain times of the year or in cer­tain re­gions, they re­sort to eat­ing shoots and leaves, often of bam­boo, a type of grass. Go­ril­las have ex­treme adap­ta­tions for chew­ing and di­gest­ing such low-qual­ity for­age, but...

    Due to the close ge­netic re­la­tion­ship be­tween hu­mans and other great apes, cer­tain an­i­mal rights or­ga­ni­za­tions, such as the Great Ape Pro­ject, argue that non­hu­man great apes are per­sons and should be given basic human rights. Some coun­tries have in­sti­tuted a re­search banto pro­tect great apes from any kind of sci­en­tific test­ing. On June 25, 2008, the Span­ish par­lia­ment sup­ported a new law that would make "keep­ing apes for cir­cuses, tele­vi­sion com­mer­cials or film­ing" illegal. On Sep­tem­ber 8, 2010, the Eu­ro­pean Union banned the test­ing of great apes.

    The fol­low­ing table lists the es­ti­mated num­ber of great ape in­di­vid­u­als liv­ing out­side zoos.

  2. Australopithecine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hominina

    Australopithecina or Hominina is a subtribe in the tribe Hominini. The members of the subtribe are generally Australopithecus ( cladistically including the genera Homo , Paranthropus , [2] and Kenyanthropus ), and it typically includes the earlier Ardipithecus , Orrorin , Sahelanthropus , and Graecopithecus .

  3. The Hominidae (/ h ɒ ˈ m ɪ n ɪ d iː /), whose members are known as great apes or hominids (/ ˈ h ɒ m ɪ n ɪ d z /), are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean, Sumatran and Tapanuli orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo; and Homo, of which only modern humans remain.

  4. Hominid (novel) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hominide

    Hominid takes place several million years ago in the Central African transitional region between rainforest and savanna. The main characters are Australopithecus afarenses, an extinct, mostly tree-dwelling hominid that existed before the use of tools and fire. The story is told through first-person narration by the protagonist, Pitar.

    • Hominide
    • Austria
  5. Hominidae - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/Hominidae

    The Hominidae, whose members are known as great apes or hominids, are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo, the Bornean, Sumatran and Tapanuli orangutan; Gorilla, the eastern and western gorilla; Pan, the common chimpanzee and the bonobo; and Homo, which includes modern humans and its extinct relatives (e.g., the Neanderthal), and ancestors ...

  6. Bigfoot - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grassman

    Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch, in Canadian folklore and American folklore, is an ape-like creature that inhabits the forests of North America.Evidence of Bigfoot's existence is based on a number of disputed short videos, photographs, visual sightings, casts of large footprints, etc.

  7. Monkey - Wikipedia

    www.wikipedia.org/search-redirect.php?family=...

    Monkey is a common name that may refer to groups or species of mammals, in part, the simians of infraorder Simiiformes. The term is applied descriptively to groups of primates, such as families of New World monkeys and Old World monkeys.

  8. Altered States - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altered_States

    Altered States is a 1980 American science-fiction horror film directed by Ken Russell based on the novel of the same name by playwright and screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky.The film was adapted from Chayefsky's only novel, published in 1978, and is his final screenplay.

  9. Ape - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ape

    "Ape", from Old English apa, is a word of uncertain origin. [b] The term has a history of rather imprecise usage—and of comedic or punning usage in the vernacular. Its earliest meaning was generally of any non-human anthropoid primate, [c] as is still the case for its cognates in other Germanic languages. [5]