Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 1,840,000 search results
  1. An alternative theory, suggested by Eric P. Hamp, is that Phrygian was most closely related to Italo-Celtic languages. Inscriptions. The Phrygian epigraphical material is divided into two distinct subcorpora, Old Phrygian and New Phrygian. These attest different stages of the Phrygian language; are written with different alphabets and upon ...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Italo-CelticItalo-Celtic - Wikipedia

    e. In historical linguistics, Italo-Celtic is a hypothetical grouping of the Italic and Celtic branches of the Indo-European language family on the basis of features shared by these two branches and no others. There is controversy about the causes of these similarities. They are usually considered to be innovations, likely to have developed ...

  3. People also ask

    What is the Phrygian language?

    How is the family tree of the Celtic languages ordered?

    What is the Italo-Celtic language?

    What was the original writing system for the Celtic languages?

    • Inscriptions
    • Grammar
    • Phonology
    • Vocabulary
    • See Also
    • References
    • External Links

    Phrygian is attested by two corpora, one from around 800 BC and later (Paleo-Phrygian), and then after a period of several centuries from around the beginning of the Common Era (Neo-Phrygian). The Paleo-Phrygian corpus is further divided (geographically) into inscriptions of Midas (city) (M, W), Gordion, Central (C), Bithynia (B), Pteria (P), Tyana...

    Its structure, what can be recovered from it, was typically Indo-European, with nouns declined for case (at least four), gender (three) and number (singular and plural), while the verbs are conjugated for tense, voice, mood, person and number. No single word is attested in all its inflectionalforms. Phrygian seems to exhibit an augment, like Greek,...

    It has long been claimed that Phrygian exhibits a Lautverschiebung of stop consonants, similar to Grimm's Law in Germanic and, more to the point, sound laws found in Proto-Armenian,i. e. voicing of PIE aspirates, devoicing of PIE voiced stops and aspiration of voiceless stops. This hypothesis has been rejected by Lejeune (1979) and Brixhe (1984). T...

    Phrygian is attested fragmentarily, known only from a comparatively small corpus of inscriptions. A few hundred Phrygian words are attested; however, the meaning and etymologies of many of these remain unknown. A famous Phrygian word is bekos, meaning "bread". According to Herodotus (Histories 2.2) Pharaoh Psammetichus I wanted to determine the old...

    Further reading

    1. Woodhouse, Robert. "An overview of research on Phrygian from the nineteenth century to the present day". Studia Linguistica Universitatis Iagellonicae Cracoviensis, Volume 126 (2009), 167-188, DOI 10.2478/v10148-010-0013-x.

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › PhrygiansPhrygians - Wikipedia

    For the play by Aeschylus, see Achilleis (trilogy). The Phrygians ( Greek: Φρύγες, Phruges or Phryges) were an ancient Indo-European speaking people, who inhabited central-western Anatolia in antiquity. They were related to the Greeks. Ancient Greek authors used "Phrygian" as an umbrella term to describe a vast ethno-cultural complex ...

    • Living Languages
    • Classification
    • Characteristics
    • Possibly Celtic Languages
    • See Also
    • References
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    SIL Ethnologue lists six living Celtic languages, of which four have retained a substantial number of native speakers. These are the Goidelic languages (Irish and Scottish Gaelic, both descended from Middle Irish) and the Brittonic languages (Welsh and Breton, both descended from Common Brittonic). The other two, Cornish (Brittonic) and Manx (Goide...

    Celtic is divided into various branches: 1. Lepontic, the oldest attested Celtic language (from the 6th century BC). Anciently spoken in Switzerland and in Northern-Central Italy. Coins with Lepontic inscriptions have been found in Noricum and Gallia Narbonensis. 2. Celtiberian, also called Eastern or Northeastern Hispano-Celtic, spoken in the anci...

    Although there are many differences between the individual Celtic languages, they do show many family resemblances. 1. consonant mutations(Insular Celtic only) 2. inflected prepositions(Insular Celtic only) 3. two grammatical genders (modern Insular Celtic only; Old Irish and the Continental languages had three genders, although Gaulish may have me...

    It has been suggested that several poorly-documented languages may have been Celtic. 1. Ancient Belgian 2. Camunic is an extinct language spoken in the first millennium BC in the Val Camonica and Valtellina valleys of the Central Alps. It has recently been proposed to be a Celtic language. 3. Ivernic 4. Ligurian, in the Northern Mediterranean Coast...

    Ball, Martin J. & James Fife (ed.) (1993). The Celtic Languages. London: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-01035-7.
    Borsley, Robert D. & Ian Roberts (ed.) (1996). The Syntax of the Celtic Languages: A Comparative Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0521481600.
    Cowgill, Warren (1975). "The origins of the Insular Celtic conjunct and absolute verbal endings". In H. Rix (ed.). Flexion und Wortbildung: Akten der V. Fachtagung der Indogermanischen Gesellschaft...
    Celtic Linguistics, 1700–1850(2000). London; New York: Routledge. 8 vols comprising 15 texts originally published between 1706 and 1844.
    Markey, Thomas L. (2006). “Early Celticity in Slovenia and at Rhaetic Magrè (Schio)”. In: Linguistica 46 (1), 145-72. https://doi.org/10.4312/linguistica.46.1.145-172.
    Sims-Williams, Patrick. “An Alternative to ‘Celtic from the East’ and ‘Celtic from the West’.” In: Cambridge Archaeological Journal30, no. 3 (2020): 511–29. doi:10.1017/S0959774320000098.
    Stifter, David. "The early Celtic epigraphic evidence and early literacy in Germanic languages". In: NOWELE - North-Western European Language Evolution, Volume 73, Issue 1, Apr 2020, pp. 123–152. I...
    Celtic languages at Curlie
    Aberdeen University Celtic Department Archived 8 December 2008 at the Wayback Machine