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    • What are the three scales to measure earthquakes?

      • "Richter" magnitude scale. ...
      • Other "Local" magnitude scales. ...
      • Body-wave magnitude scales. ...
      • Surface-wave magnitude scales. ...
      • Moment magnitude and energy magnitude scales. ...
      • Tsunami magnitude scales. ...
      • Duration and Coda magnitude scales. ...
      • Macroseismic magnitude scales. ...
      • Other magnitude scales. ...
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    What are the three scales to measure earthquakes?

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  2. Magnitude is the most common measure of an earthquake's size. It is a measure of the size of the earthquake source and is the same number no matter where you are or what the shaking feels like. The Richter scale is an outdated method for measuring magnitude that is no longer used by the USGS for large, teleseismic earthquakes. The Richter scale ...

  3. Here's a table describing the magnitudes of earthquakes, their effects, and the estimated number of those earthquakes that occur each year. The Mercalli Scale Another way to measure the strength of an earthquake is to use the observations of the people who experienced the earthquake, and the amount of damage that occurred, to estimate its ...

    • Richter Scale
    • Mercalli Scale
    • Moment Magnitude Scale

    Magnitude is a measure of the amount of energy released during an earthquake, and you've probably heard news reports about earthquake magnitudes measured using the Richter scale. Something like, "A magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck Japan today. Details at ten." Did you ever wonder why, if it's that important, they just don't tell you right away? The Richter scale was invented, logically enough, in the 1930s by Dr. Charles Richter, a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology. It is a measure of the largest seismic wave recorded on a particular kind of seismograph located 100 kilometers (about 62 miles) from the epicenter of the earthquake. Think of a seismograph as a kind of sensitive pendulum that records the shaking of the Earth. The output of a seismograph is known as a seismogram. In the early days, seismograms were produced using ink pens on paper or beams of light on photographic paper, but now it's most often done digitally using computers. The seismograph that Dr....

    What did people do before the Richter scale was invented? To some degree, one of the same things that we do today. They observed the intensity or effects of an earthquake at different locations. Whereas the magnitude of an earthquake is a single number regardless of where it's felt, intensity will vary from place to place. In general, the intensity will be much greater near the epicenter than at large distances from the epicenter. This decrease in intensity with distance is known as attenuation. Imagine it this way: If I drop a rock into a pool of water, the difference between magnitude and intensity is similar to the difference between the height of the splash exactly where I drop the rock and the height of the waves all over the pool. Earthquake intensity is most often measured using the modified Mercalli scale, which was invented by the Italian geologist Giuseppi Mercalli in 1902 and uses Roman numerals from I to XII. In the United States, we use the modified Mercalli scale, whic...

    Large earthquakes are not measured very well by the Richter scale, especially if the seimometers used are very far away from an earthquake epicenter. The moment magnitude scale is now most commonly used for medium to large earthquakes. Details of how these scales compare are discussed by Rick Aster on page 8 and 9 of the Spring, 2002 issue of Lite Geology. Created by Bill Haneberg Cartoons by Jan Thomas last modified: 20 May, 2021

  4. These instruments sense and measure vibrations in the earth around them and record the amplitude of those vibrations over time as the wavy or spiky lines of seismograms. An example of one such network is the Southern California Seismic Network, operated by Caltech and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which has recorded earthquakes since the ...

  5. Nov 01, 2019 · How do you measure earthquakes? T he Richter scale measures the largest wiggle (amplitude) on the recording, but other magnitude scales measure different parts of the earthquake. The USGS currently reports earthquake magnitudes using the Moment Magnitude scale, though many other magnitudes are calculated for research and comparison purposes.

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