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    • What happened to Latin in the Catholic Church?

      • The Roman Catholic church continues to use Late Latin in the liturgy, though they eventually decide to deliver homilies in the local popular language. The Byzantines still call themselves Romans but have given up on the Latin language. 800-900— The Carolingian Renaissance.
  1. Dec 07, 2015 · 7 Reasons for the Use of Latin in the Mass 1. The Latin language is venerable on account of its origin and its antiquity; indeed, it dates back to the earliest centuries of the Church and to the very masses offered in the obscurity of the Catacombs. 2. There is an element of mystery about Latin. It is a dead language, not spoken by the faithful.

  2. The venerable text of the Clementine Vulgate is displayed in dignity akin to the liturgical books of the Roman Rite of yesteryear, so that the format of the pages breathes forth the reverent awe that inspired the publishers and editors. The font is elegant and easy to read, thanks to the hard work of the good folks at Church Latin Publishing Co.

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    What happened to Latin in the Catholic Church?

    Why do we use Latin in the mass?

    What is the significance of the Latin language?

    What is medieval Latin used for?

  4. Jul 06, 2022 · Nearly all Roman Catholic church records used Latin to some extent. Latin was used in the records of most European countries and in the Roman Catholic records of the United States and Canada. Because Latin was used in so many countries, local usage varied. Certain terms were commonly used in some countries but not in others.

  5. Dec 06, 2020 · It is called "The Mass of the Catechumens" because in the early Church, the Catechumens were only allowed to attend the first part of the Mass. Catechumens are the unbaptized, in training, who desire to be Catholic. They would only be allowed to hear readings from the Old Testament or Epistles, read from the Epistle Side of the altar.

  6. Medieval Latin was the form of Literary Latin used in Roman Catholic Western Europe during the Middle Ages. In this region it served as the primary written language, though local languages were also written to varying degrees.

  7. The Roman Catholic church continues to use Late Latin in the liturgy, though they eventually decide to deliver homilies in the local popular language. The Byzantines still call themselves Romans but have given up on the Latin language. 800-900 — The Carolingian Renaissance.

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