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  1. Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Illinois

    Illinois (/ ˌ ɪ l ə ˈ n ɔɪ / IL-ə-NOY) is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. It has the fifth largest gross domestic product (GDP), the sixth largest population, and the 25th largest land area of all U.S. states. Illinois has been noted as a microcosm of the entire United States.

    • 57,915 sq mi (149,997 km²)
    • 13 Democrats, 5 Republicans (list)
  2. Illinois - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Illinois

    Illinois is a state in the United States. Its capital is Springfield and its largest city is Chicago. It is bordered to the north by Wisconsin, to the west by Iowa and below that, by Missouri. To the south-east, Illinois is bordered along the Ohio River by Kentucky and to the east by Indiana. Illinois' northeasternmost boundary is to Lake Michigan.

    • December 3, 1818 (21st)
    • United States
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  4. List of municipalities in Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_municipalities_in

    Illinois is a state located in the Midwestern United States. According to the 2010 United States Census , Illinois is the 6th most populous state with 12,831,549 inhabitants but the 24th largest by land area spanning 55,518.93 square miles (143,793.4 km 2 ) of land. [1]

  5. Illinois - Wikipedia

    pam.wikipedia.org › wiki › Illinois

    www.illinois.gov Ing State ning Illinois ( /ɪlɨˈnɔɪ/ ( help · info ) , pronounced ill-uh-noy ), ing pang21 state metanggap keng United States ning America , iya ing pekamarakal a populasiun ampong atin samutsamut a populasiun [1] Midwestern state ampong pang5 pekamarakal diling populasiun a state ning bangsa.

  6. Chicago - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Chicago,_Illinois
    • Overview
    • Etymology and nicknames
    • History
    • Geography
    • Demographics
    • Economy

    Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Illinois, and the third most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 2,693,976 in 2019, it is also the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, the second most populous county in the U.S., while a small portion of the city's O'Hare Airport also extends into DuPage County. Chicago is the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan

    The name "Chicago" is derived from a French rendering of the indigenous Miami-Illinois word shikaakwa for a wild relative of the onion; it is known to botanists as Allium tricoccum and known more commonly as "ramps". The first known reference to the site of the current city of Chicago as "Checagou" was by Robert de LaSalle around 1679 in a memoir. Henri Joutel, in his journal of 1688, noted that the eponymous wild "garlic" grew abundantly in the area. According to his diary of late September 168

    In the mid-18th century, the area was inhabited by the Potawatomi, a Native American tribe who had succeeded the Miami and Sauk and Fox peoples in this region. The first known non-indigenous permanent settler in Chicago was explorer Jean Baptiste Point du Sable. Du Sable was of A

    On August 12, 1833, the Town of Chicago was organized with a population of about 200. Within seven years it grew to more than 6,000 people. On June 15, 1835, the first public land sales began with Edmund Dick Taylor as Receiver of Public Monies. The City of Chicago was incorporat

    During World War I and the 1920s there was a major expansion in industry. The availability of jobs attracted African Americans from the Southern United States. Between 1910 and 1930, the African American population of Chicago increased dramatically, from 44,103 to 233,903. This G

    Chicago is located in northeastern Illinois on the southwestern shores of freshwater Lake Michigan. It is the principal city in the Chicago metropolitan area, situated in both the Midwestern United States and the Great Lakes region. The city rests on a continental divide at the s

    Major sections of the city include the central business district, called The Loop, and the North, South, and West Sides. The three sides of the city are represented on the Flag of Chicago by three horizontal white stripes. The North Side is the most-densely-populated residential

    Chicago's streets were laid out in a street grid that grew from the city's original townsite plot, which was bounded by Lake Michigan on the east, North Avenue on the north, Wood Street on the west, and 22nd Street on the south. Streets following the Public Land Survey System sec

    Religion in Chicago Protestantism Roman Catholicism Eastern Orthodoxy Jehovah's Witness No religion Judaism Islam Buddhism Hinduism The majority of Chicago's population have been and remain predominantly Christian, being the 4th-most religious metropolis in the United States afte

    Chicago has the third-largest gross metropolitan product in the United States—about $670.5 billion according to September 2017 estimates. The city has also been rated as having the most balanced economy in the United States, due to its high level of diversification. In 2007, Chicago was named the fourth-most important business center in the world in the MasterCard Worldwide Centers of Commerce Index. Additionally, the Chicago metropolitan area recorded the greatest number of new or ...

  7. Peoria, Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Peoria,_Illinois

    Peoria is the oldest European settlement in Illinois, as explorers first ventured up the Illinois River from the Mississippi. The lands that eventually would become Peoria were first settled by Europeans in 1680, [citation needed] when French explorers René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle and Henri de Tonti constructed Fort Crevecoeur.

    • United States
    • Peoria
    • 509 ft (155 m)
    • Illinois
  8. Cook County, Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Cook_County,_Illinois
    • Overview
    • History
    • Demographics
    • Geography
    • Government and politics
    • Infrastructure

    Cook County was incorporated in 1831 and named for Daniel Pope Cook, an early Illinois statesman. It achieved its present boundaries in 1839. During the first half of the 20th century it had the absolute majority of Illinois's population. There are more than 800 local governmental units and nearly 130 municipalities located partially or wholly within Cook County, the largest of which is Chicago, home to approximately 54% of the county's population. The part of the county outside of the Chicago a

    Cook County was created on January 15, 1831, out of Putnam County by an act of the Illinois General Assembly. It was the 54th county established in Illinois and was named after Daniel Cook, one of the earliest and youngest statesmen in Illinois history. He served as the second U.S. Representative from Illinois and the state's first Attorney General. In 1839, DuPage County was carved out of Cook County.

    In 2010 statistics, the largest religious group in Cook County was the Archdiocese of Chicago, with 1,947,223 Catholics worshipping at 371 parishes, followed by 209,195 non-denominational adherents with 486 congregations, an estimated 201,152 Muslims with 62 congregations, 68,865

    In July, temperatures in Chicago, Cook County average daytime highs of 84 °F, and nighttime lows of 68 °F; and January daytime highs of 31 °F, and nighttime lows of 18 °F. Winter temperatures will sometimes veer above 40 °F, and, although not common, have also risen ...

    The government of Cook County is primarily composed of the Board of Commissioners headed by the President of the County board, other elected officials such as the Sheriff, State's Attorney, Treasurer, Board of Review, Clerk, Assessor, Recorder, Circuit Court judges, and Circuit C

    To establish more localized government control and policies which reflect the often different values and needs of large suburban sections of the sprawling county, several secession movements have been made over the years which called for certain townships or municipalities to for

    Construction of the Erie Canal in New York State made a connection from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes in 1821. As the Midwest farms proved productive, with much grain to sell to other parts of the US, Chicago and Cook County saw the benefit of a canal to improve the link

    The next major technology for transportation was railroads. Chicago and the towns along the canal and rivers understood the value of being a hub of a major network. Rail lines spurred out from Chicago by the 1850s, with major growth in the rail network for freight and passenger t

    Following on the well-established position of Chicago as a transportation hub, the Interstate highway network maintained Chicago as a hub of that network, as well as serving the travel needs within the region.

  9. Wheaton, Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Wheaton,_Illinois

    Wheaton is a suburban city in Milton and Winfield Townships and is the county seat of DuPage County, Illinois. It is located approximately 25 miles (40 km) west of Chicago.As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 52,894, which was estimated to have decreased to 52,745 by July 2019, making it the 27th most populous municipality in Illinois.

  10. Naperville, Illinois - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Naperville,_Illinois

    Naperville (/ ˈ n eɪ p ər ˌ v ɪ l /) is a city in DuPage and Will counties in the U.S. state of Illinois and a suburb of Chicago.Located 28 miles (45 km) west of Chicago, Naperville was founded in 1831 and developed into the fourth-largest city in Illinois by 2018.

    • 702 ft (214 m)
    • Illinois
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