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  1. Mar 04, 2009 · Pub. L. 101-649 Immigration Act of 1990 101st Congress Nov. 29, 1990 104 STAT. 4978 _____ [S. 358] An Act To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to change the level, and preference system for admission, of immigrants to the United States, and to provide for administrative naturalization, and for other purposes.

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  2. Immigration Act of 1990 - Title I: Immigrants - Subtitle A: Worldwide and Per Country Levels - Amends the Immigration and Nationality Act (the Act) to set a permanent annual worldwide level of immigration, to begin in FY 1995, with a transition level for FY 1992 through 1994. Sets forth formulas to divide such worldwide level into worldwide levels for the following categories: (1) family-related immigrants; (2) employment-based immigrants; and (3) diversity immigrants.

  3. The Immigration Act of 1990 ( Pub.L. 101–649, 104 Stat. 4978, enacted November 29, 1990) was signed into law by George H. W. Bush on November 29, 1990. It was first introduced by Senator Ted Kennedy in 1989. It was a national reform of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965.

    • An Act To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to change the level, and preference system for admission, of immigrants to the United States, and to provide for administrative naturalization, and for other purposes.
    • Pub.L. 101–649
  4. The Immigration Act of 1990 helped permit the entry of 20 million people over the next two decades, the largest number recorded in any 20 year period since the nation’s founding. The Act also provided Temporary Protected Status so that asylum seekers could remain in the United States until conditions in their homelands improved.

    • Immigration Limits
    • Nonimmigrant Visas
    • Naturalization
    • Enforcement and Removal
    • Inadmissability

    The Immigration Act of 1990 increased the annual limits on the total level of immigration to the United States. For fiscal years 1992 through 1994, the law limited the total number of immigrants to 700,000, to be decreased to 675,000 in fiscal year 1995 and each year thereafter. The law also divided the immigration limit into distinct categories. For fiscal years 1992 through 1994, the following limits applied: 1. 465,000 visas for family-related immigration 2. 140,000 visas for employment-related immigration 3. 55,000 visas for immediate relatives of immigrants granted amnesty 4. 40,000 visas for immigrants from "adversely affected" countries In fiscal year 1995 and thereafter, the following limits applied: 1. 480,000 visas for family-related immigration 2. 140,000 visas for employment-related immigration 3. 55,000 Diversity Lotteryvisas Refugees were excluded from the immigration limits.

    The Immigration Act of 1990 revised visas awarded to nonimmigrants, such as temporary workers. In particular, the H visa category was revised to limit the number of visas issued for temporary skilled workers (H-1B) and temporary nonagricultural workers (H-2B). Under the law, the stay of H-1B visa holders was limited to six years. The law also established four new nonimmigrant visa categories: 1. the P visa category for athletes, artists, and entertainers of international recognition 2. the O visa category for individuals with "extraordinary ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or athletics" 3. the Q visa category for international cultural exchange programs 4. the R visa category for individuals in religious occupations

    The Immigration Act of 1990 established some new provisions for immigrants to naturalize as United States citizens. Under the law, an officer of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (broken into three separate entities—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)—in 2003) to make a formal declaration approving or denying applications for naturalization. Under the law, denied applicants were allowed to request an appeal hearing before another immigration officer, and further appeal to a U.S. district court.

    Under immigration law, non-citizens are eligible for removal, or deportation, if they commit an aggravated felony. The Immigration Act of 1990 expanded the list of offenses that count as an aggravated felony to include the following: 1. drug trafficking 2. money laundering resulting in a sentence of at least five years in prison 3. violent crimes resulting in a sentence of at least five years in prison 4. violations committed outside of the United States 5. violations of foreign law resulting in a prison sentence that was served within the previous 15 years The law also shortened the time frame during which individuals may request a judicial review of their final order of removal from two months to one month. Officers of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) were prohibited from issuing a stay of removal for non-citizens convicted of an aggravated felony. Non-citizens removed for committing an aggravated felony were prohibited from returning to the United States for 20 ye...

    The Immigration Act of 1990 revised the grounds for inadmissability into the country as a legal immigrant:

  5. The Immigration Act of 1990 was enacted primarily to increase skilled labor positions in the United States. As a result, the medical fields (such as doctors), the arts, sciences, education (including professors), and athletes all experienced increases in the number of skilled positions in the United States.

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