Yahoo Web Search

  1. Imperative programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_programming

    Rationale and foundations of imperative programming. The hardware implementation of almost all computers is imperative. Nearly all computer hardware is designed to execute machine code, which is native to the computer and is written in the imperative style. From this low-level perspective, the program state is defined by the contents of memory, and the statements are instructions in the native machine language of the computer.

  2. Functional programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_programming

    In computer science, functional programming is a programming paradigm where programs are constructed by applying and composing functions.It is a declarative programming paradigm in which function definitions are trees of expressions that each return a value, rather than a sequence of imperative statements which change the state of the program.

  3. Programming language - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_programming

    Imperative programming languages describe a system of state changes. At the start, the program is in a certain state, and the computer is given steps to follow, in order to perform an action. Following the steps causes the program to "change state". In general, declarative programming languages are safer and shorter.

  4. Imperative - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative

    Look up imperative or imperatively in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Imperative may refer to: Imperative mood, a grammatical mood (or mode) expressing commands, direct requests, and prohibitions. Imperative programming, a programming paradigm in computer science. Imperative logic.

  5. Imperative programming - cs.mcgill.ca

    www.cs.mcgill.ca/.../wp/i/Imperative_programming.htm
    • Overview
    • History
    • Example Languages

    The hardware implementation of almost all computers is imperative; nearly all computer hardware is designed to execute machine code, which is native to the computer, written in the imperative style. From this low-level perspective, the program state is defined by the contents of memory, and the statements are instructions in the native machine language of the computer. Higher-level imperative languages use variables and more complex statements, but still follow the same paradigm. Recipes and process checklists, while not computer programs, are also familiar concepts that are similar in style to imperative programming; each step is an instruction, and the physical world holds the state. Since the basic ideas of imperative programming are both conceptually familiar and directly embodied in the hardware, most computer languages are in the imperative style. Assignment statements, in general, perform an operation on information located in memory and store the results in memory for later...

    The earliest imperative languages were the machine languages of the original computers. In these languages, instructions were very simple, which made hardware implementation easier, but hindered the creation of complex programs. FORTRAN, developed by John Backus at IBM starting in 1954, was the first major programming language to remove the obstacles presented by machine code in the creation of complex programs. FORTRAN was a compiled language that allowed named variables, complex expressions, subprograms, and many other features now common in imperative languages. The next two decades saw the development of a number of other major high-level imperative programming languages. In the late 1950s and 1960s, ALGOL was developed in order to allow mathematical algorithms to be more easily expressed, and even served as the operating system's target language for some computers. COBOL (1960) and BASIC (1964) were both attempts to make programming syntax look more like English. In the 1970s,...

    The canonical examples of imperative programming languages are Fortran and Algol. Others include Pascal, C, and Ada. Category:Imperative programming languages provides an exhaustive list.

  6. Procedural programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procedural_programming

    However, procedural programming relies heavily on blocks and scope, whereas imperative programming as a whole may or may not have such features. As such, procedural languages generally use reserved words that act on blocks, such as if , while , and for , to implement control flow , whereas non-structured imperative languages use goto statements ...

  7. People also ask

    What functional language should I learn?

    What are examples of procedural programming languages?

    What are the characteristics of high level languages?

    What is programming language Wikipedia made in?

  8. Fortran - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortran

    Fortran (/ ˈ f ɔːr t r æ n /; formerly FORTRAN, derived from Formula Translation) is a general-purpose, compiled imperative programming language that is especially suited to numeric computation and scientific computing.

  9. Constraint programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constraint_programming

    Programming languages with built-in support for constraints include Oz (functional programming) and Kaleidoscope (imperative programming). Mostly, constraints are implemented in imperative languages via constraint solving toolkits , which are separate libraries for an existing imperative language.

  10. What is Imperative Programming? - Computer Hope's Free ...

    www.computerhope.com/jargon/i/imp-programming.htm

    Jun 30, 2019 · Imperative programming. Updated: 06/30/2019 by Computer Hope. Imperative programming is a paradigm of computer programming in which the program describes a sequence of steps that change the state of the computer. Unlike declarative programming, which describes "what" a program should accomplish, imperative programming explicitly tells the computer "how" to accomplish it.

  11. Reactive programming - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactive_programming

    In computing, reactive programming is a declarative programming paradigm concerned with data streams and the propagation of change. With this paradigm it is possible to express static (e.g., arrays) or dynamic (e.g., event emitters) data streams with ease, and also communicate that an inferred dependency within the associated execution model exists, which facilitates the automatic propagation ...