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  1. Demonstration inclined plane used in education, Museo Galileo, Florence. An inclined plane, also known as a ramp, is a flat supporting surface tilted at an angle, with one end higher than the other, used as an aid for raising or lowering a load. The inclined plane is one of the six classical simple machines defined by Renaissance scientists.

    • Uses

      Inclined planes are widely used in the form of loading ramps...

    • Terminology

      The mechanical advantage of an inclined plane depends on its...

    • Frictionless inclined plane

      If there is no friction between the object being moved and...

  2. Inclined plane. An inclined plane is a simple machine. It allows one to use less force to move an object . Examples of inclined planes are ramps, sloping roads and hills, plows, chisels, hatchets, carpenter's planes, and wedges. The typical example of an inclined plane is a sloped surface; for example a roadway to bridge at a different height.

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  4. An inclined plane is a type of cable railway used on some canals for raising boats between different water levels. Boats may be conveyed afloat, in caissons, or may be carried in cradles or slings. An inclined plane is quicker and wastes less water than a flight of canal locks, but is more costly to install and operate.

  5. An inclined plane, also known as a ramp, is a flat supporting surface tilted at an angle, with one end higher than the other, used as an aid for raising or lowering a load. The inclined plane is one of the six classical simple machines defined by Renaissance scientists. Inclined planes are widely used to move heavy loads over vertical obstacles; examples vary from a ramp used to load goods ...

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    • History
    • Operation

    The Hay Inclined Plane is a canal inclined plane in the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire, with a height of 207 feet. It was located at the end of the Shropshire Canal, part of a network of canals that linked the industrial region of east Shropshire with the River Severn. The inclined plane was in operation from 1793 to 1894. It can be visited as part of the Blists Hill Victorian Town and is also a waypoint on the South Telford Heritage Trail.

    The proprietors of the Shropshire Canal held a competition in 1788 to find the best means of raising and lowering heavy weights between the canal and the river Severn. They selected a design by Henry Williams and James Loudon, which was also used at a number of other inclined planes in east Shropshire. Construction of the Hay inclined plane was completed in 1793. By 1820 it was in poor condition and substantial repairs were needed. Further repairs were also carried out in the 1940s. In 1857 the

    The Shropshire Canal used box-shaped tub boats 20 feet long with a load capacity of 5 tons. Twin railway tracks were laid down the incline. The tub boats ascended and descended the inclined plane on wheeled cradles which ran on the rails. At the bottom of the incline the rails went underwater allowing the cradle to become submerged and the tub boat to either float free or be floated into position. At the top of the incline the rails also started under water then climbed a short slope out of the

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    • Operation

    Covasna's inclined plane is a unique standard gauge railway system used to carry logs by using gravity, without any other source of energy. The inclined plane in 1994, five years before it was permanently closed The inclined plane ran on the path that today is covered by trees with lower height, the wooden building being one of the abandoned operational stations

    Covasna's inclined plane, was designed by engineer Emil Lux in 1886, at the initiative of lumber mill owner David Horn near the border between the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Romania. The railway's main purpose was to increase wood supply and timber transportation. A narrow gauge railway Comandău - Covasna was therefore built between 1889 and 1891. After two years Horn transferred the concession to forestry company Ardeleana, formerly Erdelyi Erdoipar RT. Ardeleana was founded in 1890 and ...

    The train operated by allowing the weight of a loaded train to pull a lighter, empty train up the slope. A metal cable connected the two trains. Operation was controlled from the control room located in the top station. Trains ran on a normal track gauge. In the middle of the route a branch allowed the simultaneous passage of the wagons.

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