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  1. Foreign direct investment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_direct_investment

    FDI in China, also known as RFDI (renminbi foreign direct investment), has increased considerably in the last decade, reaching $19.1 billion in the first six months of 2012, making China the largest recipient of foreign direct investment at that point of time and topping the United States which had $17.4 billion of FDI.

  2. Investment and income relate to economics. The word comes from Ancient Greek , and relates to οἶκος oíkos "house" and νόμος nomos "custom" or "law". [3] The models used in economics today were mostly started in the 19th century.

  3. Stock market - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_market

    A stock market, equity market or share market is the aggregation of buyers and sellers of stocks (also called shares), which represent ownership claims on businesses; these may include securities listed on a public stock exchange, as well as stock that is only traded privately, such as shares of private companies which are sold to investors through equity crowdfunding platforms.

  4. Macroeconomics/Measuring Domestic Output - Wikibooks, open ...

    en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Macroeconomics/Measuring...

    Nov 16, 2013 · Investment is a bit trickier because most people confuse this term with financial investment. In economics, we refer to investment as the purchase of new capital by firms or individual consumers. That is, firms can buy non-residential capital (buildings, equipment etc.) and individual consumers can purchase residential capital (i.e. houses).

  5. Gross domestic product - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_domestic_product

    Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all the final goods and services produced in a specific time period. GDP (nominal) per capita does not, however, reflect differences in the cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries; therefore, using a basis of GDP per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP) is arguably more useful when comparing living ...

  6. Carry (investment) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carry_(investment)

    Many investment banks, such as Bear Stearns, have failed because they borrowed cheap short-term money to fund higher interest bearing long-term positions. When the long-term positions default, or the short-term interest rate rises too high (or there are simply no lenders), the bank cannot meet its short-term liabilities and goes under.

  7. International Monetary Fund - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Monetary_Fund

    The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization, headquartered in Washington, D.C., consisting of 190 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world while periodically depending on the World Bank for its resources.

  8. Full employment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Full_employment

    Economic concept. What most neoclassical economists mean by "full" employment is a rate somewhat less than 100% employment. Others, such as the late James Tobin, have been accused of disagreeing, considering full employment as 0% unemployment.

  9. Introduction to Macroeconomics - Investopedia

    www.investopedia.com/macroeconomics-4689798

    McDonough Ratio: A ratio that was developed during the Basel II conference by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. The ratio has evolved out of the Cooke ratio, which was originally ...

  10. US Government Financial Bailouts - Investopedia

    www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/08/...

    Apr 27, 2020 · The passage into U.S. law on October 3, 2008, of the $700 billion financial-sector rescue plan was the latest in the long history of U.S. government bailouts that go back to the Panic of 1792 ...