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  1. The Ipswich serial murders, commonly known as the work of the Suffolk Strangler, took place between 30 October and 10 December 2006, during which time the bodies of five murdered women were discovered at different locations near Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. All of the victims had engaged in sex work in the Ipswich area. Their bodies were discovered naked but there were no signs of sexual assault. Two of the victims, Anneli Alderton and Paula Clennell, were confirmed to have been ki Read More

    Ipswich serial murders - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipswich_serial_murders
  2. The Ipswich serial murders, commonly known as the work of the Suffolk Strangler, took place between 30 October and 10 December 2006, during which time the bodies of five murdered women were discovered at different locations near Ipswich, Suffolk, England, United Kingdom. All of the victims had engaged in sex work in the Ipswich area. Their bodies were discovered naked but there were no signs of sexual assault. Two of the victims, Anneli Alderton and Paula Clennell, were confirmed to have been ki

    • England
    • 5
    • The Suffolk Strangler
    • Steven Gerald James Wright, 24 April 1958 (age 63), Erpingham, Norfolk, England, UK
  3. Oct 24, 2021 · Fifteen years ago five women were taken from the streets of Ipswich and murdered in the space of six weeks. Prostitution has now returned to the streets of the town.

    • Modus Operandi
    • The Suspects
    • A Killer's DNA Evidence
    • Before The Arrests
    • Matching Patterns
    • Forensics
    • Portrait of The Killer
    • The Suspect Car
    • Domestic Hygiene
    • The Defence

    In the matter of body disposal, there is a distinct switch in the modus operandiof this series between the first two murders and the last three. There is a switch between the timings of the first three murders, at just over two weeks between each, and the last three, at just about three days between each murder. The last three victims were murdered inside a week. And there is a distinct switch in the matter of evidence provision for trial too, because the first two bodies were dumped in running water with no chance of evidence, while the last three were left out in the open, and posed, with (according to the prosecution case) lots of fresh evidence to prosecute Steven Wright with. And there is another corresponding switch between the two sets of murders, with the bodies of the first two being dumped to the east of Ipswich, and the bodies of the last three being dumped to the west of Ipswich. The victims disappeared in this order: 1st victim - October 31st, Tania Nicol - (the police...

    This series of murders is very odd-looking, and so is the arrest of Steven Wright. He was arrested at his home at the aggressive hour of five in the morning on December 19th 2006 and taken in for questioning. The police told the press that the basis of the arrest was CCTV footage which they thought showed Wright's car picking up the first victim. This CCTV footage was presented at the trial, and it is alleged to show Tania Nicol being picked up by Wright's Ford Mondeo, but the CCTV footage was taken at night, and the car might not have been a Ford Mondeo, and if it was, it might not have been the killer's car, or Steven Wright's, and the girl getting into it may not have been Tania Nicol either. And the fifth murder victim, Paula Clennell, reported to the police that she had seen Tania Nicol some two hours after this, talking to a man in a silver car in the red-light district. Clennell therefore died as a material witness in the case. Another witness also saw Nicol talking to two me...

    This series of murders began as a serial killer case and it ended quickly with an apparent design and purpose. It began with a killer who took the trouble of carrying the bodies to a river and dumping them there, leaving no hope of finding any of his DNA on the bodies, and it concluded (with a flourish) with the killer murdering three victims within a week and leaving the bodies exposed on dry land, with the last one hurriedly left displayed beside a busy road where the traffic could spot it easily, thereby maximising the chances of DNA or forensic evidence being recovered by the police if he had left any there to find. The first two murders indicate that the killer knew about DNA and forensic evidence and that he was concerned not to leave any behind, and the three cascade murders indicate either that the killer did not, or else that he did but that he wished to create a crime scene that would maximize the opportunity for DNA or forensic identification and minimize the risk of a fa...

    Another odd aspect of these two arrests is that the Crown Prosecution Service were brought into the investigation prior to any arrests, the justification given for this being to minimize the risk of arresting the wrong person (something that has not concerned the police before in such difficult cases) and to maximize the chances of arresting the right person. The arrest of Tom Stephens contradicts this. And if the Crown Prosecution Service was involved in the investigation before the arrests, then the arrests must have arisen from a collective prosecution enterprise rather than from an investigation of the facts by the police beforehand. The CPS cites the finding of a single carpet fibre in the hair of a victim that had been immersed in running water for weeks to justify their involvement in the investigation, but this evidence, which came from Wright's car, would not have been found before his arrest, and it is not likely to have become material evidence until after he was charged....

    Not only is this series of murders very peculiar, but so is the arresting and charging of these suspects. In fact there are further interesting correlations between the series of murders and the arrests, because the series of murders appears to be two different sets of murders, by implication with different killer profiles or motives, and there are two suspects, one of whom was arrested without any justification at the time (which contradicts the CPS's claim that they were engaged to minimize the risk of arresting the wrong person), and the other arrested without any justification except for the alleged DNA evidence, and one of these suspects was arrested because he had featured in a media interview about the case, and one of the victims died after featuring in a television interview about the murders. Another interesting correlation is that two of the victims in the second set of murders were laid out in a cruciform as though crucified, or else completely exposed to the elements, a...

    Not only are the murders and arrests peculiar, but so is the forensic evidence against Steven Wright. This evidence proves that either Steven Wright did murder these five women and fit himself up, or else that he did not, and that he has been fitted up by someone else, and that someone else had committed the murders. Collectively, this forensic evidence consisted of: - Hairs from Annette Nicholls, found in Wright's car. No other victim's hair was found in his car. This is odd if his practise was to take the women into his car and (according to other evidence at the trial) use violence there, and that only one of them left hair there. Also odd is that this evidence survived his regular car cleaning activites when that of the other victims did not. - Blood stains from Paula Clennell, on the rear seat of his car. If asphyxiation was the cause of death in these cases, why is there blood? And why no hair? Blood stains also connect Paula Clennell and Annette Nicholls to his reflective jac...

    Wright testified that he only wore his reflective jacket for going to work. The question that should be asked is, Why would a killer wear a reflective jacket at night when murdering and disposing of the bodies, unless he hoped to attract media coverage and the police? The police wear reflective jackets without thinking about it, and so apparently does the instigator of these blood stains. The collective picture of the killer that we get from the forensic evidence and from the events is of someone who would wear a reflective jacket at night when murdering and disposing of his victims; that he would increase his activity when police surveillance was at its height, and that he might use a headlock or armlock to kill his victims with. This is hardly the behaviour of a real serial serial killer, and nor is the timing of the murders. This portrait of a man who works at night at criminal matters while wearing a reflective jacket suggests police psychology and design. The prosecution's port...

    The evidence used by the prosecution included CCTV footage in black and white of a Ford Mondeo picking up Tania Nicol on the night that she is understood to have disappeared. The prosecution case was that this car was Steven Wright�s Ford Mondeo and that therefore this was the pick-up in which she was killed. However, a witness saw Nicol talking after this time to two men sitting in a posh blue car, which undermines this evidence completely. A more obvious candidate for a suspect car is a blue BMW with polished alloy wheel hubs that was seen by several witnesses. Anneli Alderton was last seen alive getting into a dark blue BMW. Gemma Adams was last seen outside a BMW garage. Annette Nicholls was seen getting into a blue BMW with polished alloy wheel hubs a week before she is thought to have vanished. Tania Nicol was last seen at the driver's window talking and giggling with two men sitting in a �posh� blue car. Another witness, a doorman at an Ipswich massage parlour, saw a driver i...

    The prosecution evidence included neighbours who testified that Wright cleaned his car every weekend, and that his washing machine was heard going twice a week. The prosecution case implied that this was evidence of a killer cleaning up afterwards, but the weekly timing of his car cleaning corresponds with domestic cleanliness, and this and the washing machine activity contradicts the slovenliness and filthiness suggested by the prosecution evidence of the semen stained gloves and reflective jacket. And the forensic evidence itself is not consistent with the imputation placed on Wright's car cleaning activity by the prosecution either. And since he had bought his car only a few weeks before, his regular car cleaning is only understandable. So, with the exception of the forensic evidence itself, this aspect of the prosecution case logically seems to implode. There is a complete map of forensic evidence connecting the series together and to Steven Wright as well, but it is also a comp...

    Not only are the murders, arrests and forensic evidence peculiar, but so is Steven Wright's defence. His defence is that he did not murder any of the victims, but that he did have sex with all but one, namely Tania Nicol, the first victim, who he claims he had picked up but had changed his mind about. His defence accepts that he had sex with all of them on the last night of their lives, but that he didn't kill them. So why should an innocent man defend himself by placing himself with the victims at the time that they were murdered, when the series stopped with his arrest? Wright's defence requires the public to believe that immediately after his having had sex with the victims, someone else murdered them. This is highly unlikely, but there is another explanation for his defence. If Wright had had sex with the victims, and if he has been fitted up with this forensic evidence, then he may well not be able to remember at what point he had had sex with them in relation to their disappea...

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  5. Oct 17, 2016 · Ipswich 2006 – a media frenzy accompanies the murder of five women in the town. Photograph: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images. Ipswich 2006 – a media frenzy accompanies the murder of five women ...

  6. When his marriage ended, Des Thorpe became a homeless alcoholic. His young daughter ran away from foster care to be with her dad and grew up on the streets. ...

    • 31 min
    • 415
    • Evidence Locker Podcast
  7. Oct 30, 2016 · The Ipswich murders resulted in a clampdown on prostitution and a strategy was set up to eradicate it from the town. Furthermore, the police nationally changed their approach to policing sex work.

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