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    Is Cholera Contagious human to human?

    What is cholera caused by bacteria or virus?

    How can cholera can be transmitted?

    What are communicable and non-communicable diseases?

  2. Is Cholera Contagious? - MedicineNet

    www.medicinenet.com/is_cholera_contagious/...

    Cholera is highly contagious. Cholera can be transferred person to person by infected fecal matter entering a mouth or by water or food contaminated with Vibrio cholerae bacteria. The organisms can survive well in salty waters and can contaminate humans and other organisms that contact or swim in the water.

  3. Communicable And Non Communicable Diseases - Types & Causes

    byjus.com/.../diseases-communicable-non-communicable

    These can be spread from one person to another hence are also called communicable disease. For example cholera, malaria, chickenpox. Non-communicable Disease. Non-infectious are non-communicable diseases and caused by a variety of reasons. Some of the reasons for the non-infectious disease are genetics, nutritional deficiency, age and sex of the individual and so on.

  4. Cholera - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cholera/...
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Cholera is a bacterial disease usually spread through contaminated water. Cholera causes severe diarrhea and dehydration. Left untreated, cholera can be fatal in a matter of hours, even in previously healthy people.Modern sewage and water treatment have virtually eliminated cholera in industrialized countries. The last major outbreak in the United States occurred in 1911. But cholera is still present in Africa, Southeast Asia and Haiti. The risk of cholera epidemic is highest when poverty, wa...

    Most people exposed to the cholera bacterium (Vibrio cholerae) don't become ill and never know they've been infected. Yet because they shed cholera bacteria in their stool for seven to 14 days, they can still infect others through contaminated water. Most symptomatic cases of cholera cause mild or moderate diarrhea that's often hard to distinguish from diarrhea caused by other problems.Only about 1 in 10 infected people develops more-serious signs and symptoms of cholera, usually within a few...

    A bacterium called Vibrio cholerae causes cholera infection. However, the deadly effects of the disease are the result of a potent toxin called CTX that the bacterium produce in the small intestine. CTX binds to the intestinal walls, where it interferes with the normal flow of sodium and chloride. This causes the body to secrete enormous amounts of water, leading to diarrhea and a rapid loss of fluids and salts (electrolytes).Contaminated water supplies are the main source of cholera infectio...

    Everyone is susceptible to cholera, with the exception of infants who derive immunity from nursing mothers who have previously had cholera. Still, certain factors can make you more vulnerable to the disease or more likely to experience severe signs and symptoms. Risk factors for cholera include: 1. Poor sanitary conditions. Cholera is more likely to flourish in situations where a sanitary environment — including a safe water supply — is difficult to maintain. Such conditions are common to ref...

    Cholera can quickly become fatal. In the most severe cases, the rapid loss of large amounts of fluids and electrolytes can lead to death within two to three hours. In less extreme situations, people who don't receive treatment may die of dehydration and shock hours to days after cholera symptoms first appear.Although shock and severe dehydration are the most devastating complications of cholera, other problems can occur, such as: 1. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Dangerously low levels of bl...

    Cholera is rare in the United States with the few cases related to travel outside the U.S. or to contaminated and improperly cooked seafood from the Gulf Coast waters.If you're traveling to cholera-endemic areas, your risk of contracting the disease is extremely low if you follow these precautions: 1. Wash hands with soap and water frequently, especially after using the toilet and before handling food. Rub soapy, wet hands together for at least 15 seconds before rinsing. If soap and water are...

  5. General Information | Cholera | CDC

    www.cdc.gov/cholera/general

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) investigates epidemic cholera wherever it occurs at the invitation of the affected country and trains laboratory workers in proper techniques for identification of Vibrio cholerae. In addition, CDC provides information on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cholera to public health ...

  6. Cholera - HISTORY

    www.history.com/topics/inventions/history-of-cholera

    Cholera is an infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Vibrio cholerae. The bacteria typically live in waters that are somewhat salty and warm, such as estuaries and waters along coastal...

  7. Contagious vs infectious disease, there is a big difference

    www.kwtx.com/content/news/Contagious-vs...

    Apr 17, 2020 · Non-communicable means these diseases are not transmitted through contact with an infected or afflicted person, but are instead, caused by various genetic, physiological, environmental, and ...

  8. Important Differences Between Communicable and Non ...

    byjus.com/neet/difference-between-communicable...

    On the other hand, non-communicable diseases are the diseases which are not transmitted from one to another person. These are typically some of the allergies, nutrient deficiencies etc. Difference between Communicable and Non-communicable diseases. The table below depicts the important differences between communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  9. Diseases and epidemics of the 19th century - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diseases_and_epidemics_of...

    Diseases and epidemics of the 19th century included long-standing epidemic threats such as smallpox, typhus, yellow fever, and scarlet fever.In addition, cholera emerged as an epidemic threat and spread worldwide in six pandemics in the nineteenth century.