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  2. Strep Throat: All You Need to Know | CDC

    www.cdc.gov › diseases-public › strep-throat

    Jan 12, 2021 · Strep throat is a common type of sore throat in children, but it’s not very common in adults. Doctors can do a quick test to see if a sore throat is strep throat. If so, antibiotics can help you feel better faster and prevent spreading it to others. Bacteria Cause Strep Throat

  3. Symptoms of Strep Throat in Adults | Patient Advice | US News

    health.usnews.com › conditions › articles

    Jan 07, 2020 · Strep throat is a common respiratory disease that tends to affect more children than adults, but it can affect anyone at any age. And while it tends to be somewhat more prevalent in the winter...

    • Elaine K. Howley
  4. Strep throat - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

    www.mayoclinic.org › diseases-conditions › strep
    • Overview
    • Symptoms
    • Causes
    • Risk Factors
    • Complications
    • Prevention

    Strep throat is a bacterial infection that can make your throat feel sore and scratchy. Strep throat accounts for only a small portion of sore throats.If untreated, strep throat can cause complications, such as kidney inflammation or rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever can lead to painful and inflamed joints, a specific type of rash, or heart valve damage.Strep throat is most common in children, but it affects people of all ages. If you or your child has signs or symptoms of strep throat, see yo...

    Signs and symptoms of strep throat can include: 1. Throat pain that usually comes on quickly 2. Painful swallowing 3. Red and swollen tonsils, sometimes with white patches or streaks of pus 4. Tiny red spots on the area at the back of the roof of the mouth (soft or hard palate) 5. Swollen, tender lymph nodes in your neck 6. Fever 7. Headache 8. Rash 9. Nausea or vomiting, especially in younger children 10. Body achesIt's possible for you or your child to have many of these signs and symptoms...

    The cause of strep throat is bacteria known as Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A streptococcus.Streptococcal bacteria are highly contagious. They can spread through airborne droplets when someone with the infection coughs or sneezes, or through shared food or drinks. You can also pick up the bacteria from a doorknob or other surface and transfer them to your nose, mouth or eyes.

    Several factors can increase your risk of strep throat infection: 1. Young age. Strep throat occurs most commonly in children. 2. Time of year. Although strep throat can occur anytime, it tends to circulate in winter and early spring. Strep bacteria flourish wherever groups of people are in close contact.

    Although strep throat isn't dangerous, it can lead to serious complications. Antibiotic treatment reduces the risk.

    To prevent strep infection: 1. Clean your hands. Proper hand cleaning is the best way to prevent all kinds of infections. That's why it's important to clean your own hands regularly and to teach your children how to clean their hands properly using soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. 2. Cover your mouth. Teach your children to cover their mouths when they cough or sneeze. 3. Don't share personal items. Don't share drinking glasses or eating utensils. Wash dishes in hot, soapy w...

  5. Strep Throat Symptoms in Adults | University Health News

    universityhealthnews.com › daily › eyes-ears-nose

    Strep Throat Symptoms in Adults One of the most noticeable strep throat symptoms in adults is that the sore throat comes on quickly and lasts 48 hours or more (a viral, non-strep sore throat usually starts with a little irritation and lasts only a day or two). Other common strep throat symptoms in adults include:

  6. Pharyngitis (Strep Throat): Information For Clinicians | CDC

    www.cdc.gov › diseases-hcp › strep-throat
    • Etiology
    • Clinical Features
    • Transmission
    • Risk Factors
    • Diagnosis and Testing
    • Special Considerations
    • Treatment
    • Carriage
    • Prognosis and Complications
    • Prevention
    • Epidemiology and Surveillance
    • Resources

    Group A strep pharyngitis is an infection of the oropharynx caused by S. pyogenes. S. pyogenes are gram-positive cocci that grow in chains (see figure 1). They exhibit β-hemolysis (complete hemolysis) when grown on blood agar plates. They belong to group A in the Lancefield classification system for β-hemolytic Streptococcus, and thus are called group A streptococci.

    Group A strep pharyngitis is an acute pharyngitis that commonly presents with 1. Sudden-onset of sore throat 2. Odynophagia 3. FeverOther symptoms may include headache, abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting — especially among children. Patients with group A strep pharyngitis typically do not typically have cough, rhinorrhea, hoarseness, oral ulcers, or conjunctivitis. These symptoms strongly suggest a viral etiology.On clinical examination, patients with group A strep pharyngitis usually have...

    Group A strep pharyngitis is most commonly spread through direct person-to-person transmission. Typically transmission occurs through saliva or nasal secretions from an infected person. People with group A strep pharyngitis are much more likely to transmit the bacteria to others than asymptomatic pharyngeal carriers. Crowded conditions — such as those in schools, daycare centers, or military training facilities — facilitate transmission. Although rare, spread of group A strep infections may a...

    Group A strep pharyngitis can occur in people of all ages. It is most common among children 5 through 15 years of age. It is rare in children younger than 3 years of age.The most common risk factor is close contact with another person with group A strep pharyngitis. Adults at increased risk for group A strep pharyngitis include: 1. Parents of school-aged children 2. Adults who are often in contact with childrenCrowding, such as found in schools, military barracks, and daycare centers, increas...

    The differential diagnosis of acute pharyngitis includes multiple viral and bacterial pathogens. Viruses are the most common cause of pharyngitis in all age groups. Experts estimate that group A strep, the most common bacterial cause, causes 20% to 30% of pharyngitis episodes in children. In comparison, experts estimate it causes approximately 5% to 15% of pharyngitis infections in adults.History and clinical examination can be used to diagnose viral pharyngitis when clear viral symptoms are...

    Clinicians should confirm group A strep pharyngitis in children older than 3 years of age to appropriately guide treatment decisions. Giving antibiotics to children with confirmed group A strep pharyngitis can reduce their risk of developing sequela (acute rheumatic fever). Testing for group A strep pharyngitis is not routinely indicated for: 1. Children younger than 3 years of age 2. AdultsAcute rheumatic fever is very rare in those age groups.Clinicians can use a positive RADT as confirmati...

    The use of a recommended antibiotic regimen to treat group A strep pharyngitis: 1. Shortens the duration of symptoms 2. Reduces the likelihood of transmission to family members, classmates, and other close contacts 3. Prevents the development of complications, including acute rheumatic feverWhen left untreated, the symptoms of group A strep pharyngitis are usually self-limited. However, acute rheumatic fever and suppurative complications (e.g., peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis) are more lik...

    Asymptomatic group A strep carriers usually do not require treatment. Carriers have positive throat cultures or are RADT positive, but do not have clinical symptoms or an immunologic response to group A strep antigens on laboratory testing. Compared to people with symptomatic pharyngitis, carriers are much less likely to transmit group A strep to others. Carriers are also very unlikely to develop suppurative or nonsuppurative complications.Some people with recurrent episodes of acute pharyngi...

    Rarely, suppurative and nonsuppurative complications can occur after group A strep pharyngitis. Suppurative complications result from the spread of group A strep from the pharynx to adjacent structures. They can include: 1. Peritonsillar abscess 2. Retropharyngeal abscess 3. Cervical lymphadenitis 4. MastoiditisOther focal infections or sepsis are even less common.Acute rheumatic fever is a nonsuppurative sequelae of group A strep pharyngitis. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis is a nonsup...

    Good hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette can reduce the spread of all types of group A strep infection. Hand hygiene is especially important after coughing and sneezing and before preparing foods or eating. Good respiratory etiquette involves covering your cough or sneeze. Treating an infected person with an antibiotic for 24 hours or longer generally eliminates their ability to transmit the bacteria. Thus, people with group A strep pharyngitis should stay home from work, school, or daycar...

    Humans are the only reservoir for group A strep. It is most common among children 5 through 15 years of age. It is rare in children younger than 3 years of age. In the United States, group A strep pharyngitis is most common during the winter and spring.CDC does not track the incidence of group A strep pharyngitis or other non-invasive group A strep infections. CDC tracks invasive group A strep infections through the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) program. For information on the inc...

    1. Shulman ST, Bisno AL, Clegg HW, Gerber MA, Kaplan EL, Lee G, et al. Clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis: 2012 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of AmericaExternal. Clin Infect Dis. 2012;55(10):1279–82. 2. Shulman ST, Bisno AL, Clegg HW, Gerber MA, Kaplan EL, Lee G, et al. Erratum to clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and management of group A streptococcal pharyngitis: 2012 update by the Infectious Diseases S...

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