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  1. Indo-European languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Indo-European_languages

    4 days ago · There are about 445 living Indo-European languages, according to the estimate by Ethnologue, with over two thirds (313) of them belonging to the Indo-Iranian branch. All Indo-European languages have descended from a single prehistoric language, reconstructed as Proto-Indo-European, spoken sometime in the Neolithic era.

    • Pre-colonial era: Eurasia, Today: Worldwide, c. 3.2 billion native speakers
    • Proto-Indo-European
  2. List of English words of Hindi or Urdu origin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_English_words_of

    Mar 30, 2021 · This is a list of English-language words of Hindi and Urdu origin, two distinguished registers of the Hindustani language.Many of the Hindi and Urdu equivalents have originated from Sanskrit; see List of English words of Sanskrit origin.

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  4. Indo-Aryan languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Indo-Aryan_language

    4 days ago · Urdu, a Persianized derivative of Khariboli, is the official language of Pakistan and also has strong historical connections to India, where it also has been designated with official status. Hindi, a standardized and Sanskritized register of Khariboli, is the official language of the Government of India.

  5. Proto-Indo-European language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Proto_Indoeuropean

    Mar 26, 2021 · The Venetic and Liburnian languages known from the North Adriatic region are sometimes classified as Italic. The Paleo-Balkan languages , which occur in or near the Balkan peninsula , do not appear to be members of any of the subfamilies of PIE, but are so poorly attested that proper classification of them is not possible.

  6. Garhwali language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Garhwali_language

    Apr 02, 2021 · Garhwali (गढ़वळि, gɜɽʱʋɜliˑ) is an Indo-Aryan language of the Central Pahari subgroup.It is primarily spoken by over 2.5 million Garhwali people in the Garhwal region of the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand in the Indian Himalayas.

    • 2.5 million (2011), Official census results conflate some speakers with Hindi.
    • India
  7. Official names of India - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Official_names_of_India

    Mar 30, 2021 · India has 23 official languages. The its constitution lists the name of the country in each of the languages. Hindi and English (listed in boldface) are the "official languages of the union" (Union meaning the Federal Government located in Delhi); Tamil and Sanskrit are officially the "classical languages of India."

  8. virus - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › virus
    • English
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    • Northern Sami

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin vīrus (“poison, slime, venom”), via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

    Pronunciation

    1. enPR: vīʹrəs, IPA(key): /ˈvaɪɹəs/ 2. Rhymes: -aɪɹəs

    Noun

    virus (countable and uncountable, plural viruses or (proscribed) viri or (proscribed) virii) Wikispecies 1. (archaic) Venom, as produced by a poisonous animal etc.quotations ▼ 1.1. 1890, Aluísio Azevedo, The Slum: 1.1.1. Brazil, that inferno where every budding flower and every buzzing bluebottle fly bears a lascivious virus. 2. A submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often cau...

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin virus.

    Noun

    virus m (plural virus) 1. virus

    Alternative forms

    1. vir

    Etymology

    From Latin virus.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [ˈvɪrus]

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin vīrus. Coined in the virological sense by Martinus Beijerinck; the word had been previously used for pathogens, although not for viruses in the modern sense. The computing sense derives from English virus.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈviː.rʏs/ 2. Hyphenation: vi‧rus

    Noun

    virus n (plural virussen, diminutive virusje n) 1. (microbiology) virus 2. (computer science) virus

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin virus (“poison, slime, venom”).

    Noun

    virus m (plural virus) 1. virus(pathogen) 2. computer virus

    Etymology

    Learned borrowing from Latin virus, from rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). Doublet of bisa.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [ˈvirʊs] 2. Hyphenation: vi‧rus

    Noun

    virus (plural, first-person possessive virusku, second-person possessive virusmu, third-person possessive virusnya) 1. virus, 1.1. (biology)a submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism. 1.2. (computing)a type of malware which can covertly transmit itself between computers via networks (especially the Internet) or removable storage such as di...

    Noun

    virus (plural viruses) 1. virus

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈvirus/

    Noun

    virus m (Latin spelling) 1. virusquotations ▼ 1.1. 2018 February 7, Dora Niyego, “El Antisemitizmo De Oy”, in Şalom‎: 1.1.1. El antisemitizmo es un prejudizio, komo un virus. 1.1.1.1. Antisemitism is a prejudice, like a virus.

    Etymology

    Via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). Cognates include Sanskrit विष (viṣá), Ancient Greek ἰός (iós), Tocharian B wase, and Middle Irish fí. The neuter gender of this term despite its nominative singular ending in the masculine second-declension -usis a relic of this term's inheritance from a neuter s-stem.

    Pronunciation

    1. (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈwiː.rus/, [ˈwiː.rʊs] 2. (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈvi.rus/, [ˈviː.rus]

    Noun

    vīrus n sg (genitive vīrī); second declension 1. A stinking, or rammishsmell. 2. The seed or nature in animals. 3. A nasty taste. 4. Poison, venom. 5. Bitterness, sharpness. 6. The juice of the purple-fish. 7. A strong smell of spices or perfumes. 8. slimy liquid, slime

    Etymology

    (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    Noun

    virus 1. virus

  9. mica - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › mica
    • English
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    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin mīca (“grain, crumb”).

    Pronunciation

    1. enPR: mīkə, IPA(key): /ˈmaɪkə/ 2. Rhymes: -aɪkə

    Noun

    mica (countable and uncountable, plural micas) 1. (mineralogy) Any of a group of hydrous aluminosilicate mineralscharacterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic.

    Etymology 1

    From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan mica), from Vulgar Latin *micca, variant of Latin mīca, from Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (“small, thin, delicate”).

    Pronunciation

    1. (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈmi.kə/ 2. (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmi.ka/

    Noun

    mica f (plural miques) 1. a bit, a small piece

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin mīca.

    Noun

    mica f (plural micas) 1. (mineralogy) mica

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈmi.ka/

    Etymology 1

    From Latin mīca, from Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (“small, thin, delicate”).

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from Latin mīca, the same source as the above.

    Etymology

    From Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (“small, thin, delicate”), related to Old English smicor (“beauteous, beautiful, elegant, fair, fine, tasteful”). More at smicker.

    Pronunciation

    1. (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈmiː.ka/ 2. (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈmi.ka/, [ˈmiː.ka]

    Noun

    mīca f (genitive mīcae); first declension 1. crumb, morsel, grain 2. (New Latin, mineralogy) mica

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin mīca. Compare the inherited doublet miga.

    Noun

    mica f (plural micas) 1. (mineralogy) mica (hydrous aluminosilicate mineral)

    Verb

    mica 1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of micar 2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of micar

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [ˈmi.ka]

    Adjective

    mica 1. definite nominative feminine singular of mic 2. definite accusative feminine singular of mic

  10. as - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › as

    Apr 02, 2021 · As (Roman coin) on Wikipedia. Wikipedia ; Etymology 3 . a +‎ -s. Pronunciation . IPA : /ˈeɪz/ Noun . as. plural of a (compare with aes) Usage notes . There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols.