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  1. List of Indo-European languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_Italic_languages

    The Indo-European languages include some 449 (SIL estimate, 2018 edition) language families spoken by about or more than 3.5 billion people (roughly half of the world population). Most of the major languages belonging to language branches and groups of Europe, and Western and southern Asia, belong to the Indo-European language family. Therefore ...

  2. List of English words of Dravidian origin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_English_words_of

    Dravidian languages include Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, and a number of other languages spoken mainly in South Asia. The list is by no means exhaustive. Some of the words can be traced to specific languages, but others have disputed or uncertain origins. Words of disputed or less certain origin are in the "Dravidian languages" list.

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    How many Garhwali language speakers are there in India?

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  4. Garhwali language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Tehri_language

    Garhwali language was featured in Part IV - 'Pahari Languages & Gujuri' of Volume IX - 'Indo-Aryan Languages, Central Group' published in 1916 by Grierson. Recordings include the parable of The Prodigal Son and of a well-known folk-tale: the fable of the 'Bundle of Sticks' in Garhwali.

    • 2.5 million (2011), Official census results conflate some speakers with Hindi.
    • India
  5. Kumaoni language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › ISO_639:kfy

    Kumaoni is not endangered but UNESCO's Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger designates it as a language in the unsafe category, meaning it requires consistent conservation efforts. almost all people who can speak and understand Kumaoni can also speak and understand Hindi [citation needed], one of the official languages of India.

    • 2 million (2011 census)
    • India
  6. Official names of India - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.m.wikipedia.org › wiki › Official_names_of_India

    India has 23 official languages. The its constitution lists the name of the country in each of the languages. Hindi and English (listed in boldface) are the "official languages of the union" (Union meaning the Federal Government located in Delhi); Tamil and Sanskrit are officially the "classical languages of India."

  7. Dravidian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Tamil-Malayalam_language

    Etymology. The origin of the Sanskrit word drāviḍa is the word tamiẓ (Tamil). Kamil Zvelebil cites the forms such as dramila (in Daṇḍin's Sanskrit work Avanisundarīkathā) damiḷa (found in the Sri Lankan (Ceylonese) chronicle Mahavamsa) and then goes on to say, "The forms damiḷa/damila almost certainly provide a connection of dr(a/ā)viḍa" and "...

  8. Bhasa - Wikipedia

    hif.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bhasa

    Standard Hindi 325,000,000; A total of 650,000,000 including Urdu (Pakistanke official bhasa ) aur jiske duusra bhasa hae, isme Maithili nai hae. Sab Hindi-Urdu dialect me baat kare waale ek duusre ke samajhe sake hae.

  9. virus - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › virus
    • English
    • Asturian
    • Czech
    • Dutch
    • Galician
    • Indonesian
    • Interlingua
    • Ladino
    • Latin
    • Northern Sami

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin vīrus (“poison, slime, venom”), via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). First use in the computer context by David Gerrold in his 1972 book When HARLIE Was One.

    Pronunciation

    1. enPR: vīʹrəs, IPA(key): /ˈvaɪɹəs/ 2. Rhymes: -aɪɹəs

    Noun

    virus (countable and uncountable, plural viruses or (proscribed) viri or (proscribed) virii) Wikispecies 1. (archaic) Venom, as produced by a poisonous animal etc.quotations ▼ 1.1. 1890, Aluísio Azevedo, The Slum: 1.1.1. Brazil, that inferno where every budding flower and every buzzing bluebottle fly bears a lascivious virus. 2. A submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often cau...

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin virus.

    Noun

    virus m (plural virus) 1. virus

    Alternative forms

    1. vir

    Etymology

    From Latin virus.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [ˈvɪrus]

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin vīrus. Coined in the virological sense by Martinus Beijerinck; the word had been previously used for pathogens, although not for viruses in the modern sense. The computing sense derives from English virus.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈviː.rʏs/ 2. Hyphenation: vi‧rus

    Noun

    virus n (plural virussen, diminutive virusje n) 1. (microbiology) virus 2. (computer science) virus

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin virus (“poison, slime, venom”).

    Noun

    virus m (plural virus) 1. virus(pathogen) 2. computer virus

    Etymology

    Learned borrowing from Latin virus, from rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). Doublet of bisa.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): [ˈvirʊs] 2. Hyphenation: vi‧rus

    Noun

    virus (plural, first-person possessive virusku, second-person possessive virusmu, third-person possessive virusnya) 1. virus, 1.1. (biology)a submicroscopic, non-cellular structure consisting of a core of DNA or RNA surrounded by a protein coat, that requires a living host cell to replicate, and often causes disease in the host organism. 1.2. (computing)a type of malware which can covertly transmit itself between computers via networks (especially the Internet) or removable storage such as di...

    Noun

    virus (plural viruses) 1. virus

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈvirus/

    Noun

    virus m (Latin spelling) 1. virusquotations ▼ 1.1. 2018 February 7, Dora Niyego, “El Antisemitizmo De Oy”, in Şalom‎: 1.1.1. El antisemitizmo es un prejudizio, komo un virus. 1.1.1.1. Antisemitism is a prejudice, like a virus.

    Etymology

    Via rhotacism from Proto-Italic *weisos, from Proto-Indo-European *wisós (“fluidity, slime, poison”). Cognates include Sanskrit विष (viṣá), Ancient Greek ἰός (iós), Tocharian B wase, and Middle Irish fí. The neuter gender of this term despite its nominative singular ending in the masculine second-declension -usis a relic of this term's inheritance from a neuter s-stem.

    Pronunciation

    1. (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈwiː.rus/, [ˈwiː.rʊs] 2. (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈvi.rus/, [ˈviː.rus]

    Noun

    vīrus n sg (genitive vīrī); second declension 1. A stinking, or rammishsmell. 2. The seed or nature in animals. 3. A nasty taste. 4. Poison, venom. 5. Bitterness, sharpness. 6. The juice of the purple-fish. 7. A strong smell of spices or perfumes. 8. slimy liquid, slime

    Etymology

    (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

    Noun

    virus 1. virus

  10. Why does Hindi sound so much like some European languages ...

    www.quora.com › Why-does-Hindi-sound-so-much-like

    Well your ears are working well and your assumptions are astute. Hindi has some similarities to European languages because they belong to the same language tree, the Indo-European languages.

  11. English to Bangla Meaning of italic - bdword.com

    www.bdword.com › english-to-bengali-meaning-italic

    Meaning and definitions of italic, translation in Bangla language for italic with similar and opposite words. Also find spoken pronunciation of italic in Bangla and in English language.

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