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  1. Jadwiga of Poland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jadwiga_of_Poland

    1 day ago · The nobility of Greater Poland favored him and proposed that he marry Jadwiga. However, Lesser Poland's nobility opposed him and persuaded Queen Elizabeth to send Jadwiga to Poland. Jadwiga was crowned "king" in Poland's capital, Kraków, on 16 October 1384.

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  3. List of wars involving Poland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars_involving_Poland

    1 day ago · In the turmoil of the First World War, Poles managed to regain independence and then to expand their territory in a series of local wars and uprisings; only to be occupied again during the next world war. The second half of the 20th century was more peaceful, but still tense, as Poland was involved in the Cold War on the Soviet side.

  4. Battle of Grunwald - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Grunwald

    Jan 14, 2021 · The Battle of Grunwald, Battle of Žalgiris or First Battle of Tannenberg was fought on 15 July 1410 during the Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War.The alliance of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, led respectively by King Władysław II Jagiełło (Jogaila) and Grand Duke Vytautas, decisively defeated the German–Prussian Teutonic Knights, led by Grand ...

    • Decisive Polish–Lithuanian victory
  5. Khmelnytsky Uprising - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khmelnytsky_Uprising

    6 days ago · The success of anti-Polish rebellion, along with internal conflicts in Poland as well as concurrent wars waged by Poland with Russia and Sweden (Russo-Polish War (1654–1667) and Second Northern War (1655–1660) respectively), ended the Polish Golden Age and caused a secular decline of Polish power during the period known in Polish history as ...

  6. Solidarity (Polish trade union) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidarity_(Polish_trade...

    6 days ago · In 1979, the Polish economy shrank for the first time since World War II, by 2 percent. Foreign debt reached around $18 billion by 1980. Anna Walentynowicz was fired from the Gdańsk Shipyard on 7 August 1980, five months before she was due to retire, for participation in the illegal trade union. This management decision enraged the workers of ...

    • Independent Self-governing Trade Union "Solidarity"
    • Niezależny Samorządny Związek Zawodowy "Solidarność"
    • Almost 10 million at the end of the first year; over 400,000 in 2011 (680,000 in 2010)
    • ITUC, ETUC, TUAC
  7. Senate of Poland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senate_of_Poland

    4 days ago · After the invasion of Poland by German forces, on 2 November 1939, the president of Poland Ignacy Mościcki ordered that the Senate and Sejm cease to operate and remain in recess until the end of the war, after which elections were ordered to take place within 60 days after the cessation of hostilities; this however, was never to take place.

  8. Casimir III the Great - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_III_the_Great

    1 day ago · Casimir III the Great (Polish: Kazimierz III Wielki; 30 April 1310 – 5 November 1370) reigned as the King of Poland from 1333 to 1370. He also later became King of Russia in 1340, and fought to retain the title in the Galicia-Volhynia Wars .

  9. Augustus III of Poland - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustus_III_of_Poland

    2 days ago · On 8 January 1745, the Treaty of Warsaw united Great Britain, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Dutch Republic and Saxony into what became known as the "Quadruple Alliance", which was aimed at securing the Austrian throne for Maria Theresa. Soon-after Charles VII died of gout in Munich, which weakened the Prussians.

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