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  1. James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 [b] – June 28, 1836) was an American statesman, diplomat, and Founding Father. He served as the fourth president of the United States from 1809 to 1817. Madison is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights .

  2. James Madison. James Madison Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was a Founding Father and the fourth president of the United States. He was also the most important author of the United States Constitution and a slaveowner with a big plantation. [1] Madison was the shortest president, with a height of 5 feet 4 inches (1.63 meters).

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    • Early Life and Education
    • Military Service and Early Political Career
    • Father of The Constitution
    • The Federalist Papers and Ratification Debates
    • Member of Congress
    • Founding The Democratic-Republican Party
    • Marriage and Family
    • United States Secretary of State 1801–1809
    • Election of 1808
    • Presidency 1809–1817

    James Madison, Jr. was born at Belle Grove Plantation near Port Conway, Virginia on March 16, 1751, (March 5, 1751, Old Style, Julian calendar), where his mother had returned to her parents' home to give birth. He grew up as the oldest of twelve children.[3] Nelly and James Sr. had seven more boys and four girls. Three of James Jr.'s brothers died ...

    After graduation from Princeton, Madison became interested in the relationship between the American colonies and Great Britain, which deteriorated over the issue of British taxation. In 1774, Madison took a seat on the local Committee of Safety, a patriot pro-revolution group that oversaw the local militia. This was the first step in a life of publ...

    The Articles of Confederation established the United States as an association of sovereign states with a weak central government. This arrangement was met with disapproval, and was mostly unsuccessful after the war. Congress had no power to tax, and was unable to pay debts from the Revolution, which concerned Madison and other nationalists, such as...

    Template:Republicanism sidebar Following the Constitutional Convention, there ensued an intense battle over the Constitution's ratification. Each state was requested to hold a special convention to deliberate and determine whether or not to ratify the Constitution.[33] Madison was a leader in the ratification effort. He, Alexander Hamilton and John...

    Madison had been a delegate to the Confederation Congress, and wanted to be elected senator in the new government. A vengeful Patrick Henry wanted to deny Madison a seat in the new congress, so he ensured that Madison remained in the lame duck Confederation Congress to prevent him as long as possible from campaigning. Henry used his power to keep t...

    Supporters for ratification of the Constitution had become known as the Federalist Party. Those opposing the proposed constitution were labeled Anti-Federalists, but neither group was a political party in the modern sense. Following ratification of the Constitution and formation of the first government in 1789, two new political factions formed alo...

    Madison was 43 when he married for the first time, which was considered late in that era. On September 15, 1794, James Madison married Dolley Payne Todd, a 26-year-old widow, at Harewood, in what is now Jefferson County, West Virginia.[3] Madison had no children but did adopt Todd's one surviving son, John Payne Todd(known as Payne), after the marr...

    When Thomas Jefferson was inaugurated as president in 1801, he named Madison to be his secretary of state. At the start of his term, Madison was a party to the United States Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison (1803), in which the doctrine of judicial review was asserted by the high Court, much to the annoyance of the Jeffersonians who did not wa...

    With Jefferson's second term winding down, and his decision to retire widely known, Madison was the party choice for president in 1808. He was opposed by Rep. John Randolph, who had broken earlier with Jefferson and Madison. The Republican Party Congressional caucus chose the candidate and easily selected Madison over James Monroe.[77] As the Feder...

    Upon his inauguration in 1809, Madison immediately had difficulty in his appointment selection of Sec. Albert Gallatin as Secretary of State.[79] Under opposition from Sen. William B. Giles, Madison chose not to fight Congress for the nomination but kept Sec. Gallatin, a carry over from the Jefferson administration, in the Treasury.[79] The talente...

  4. Throughout his life, James Madison 's views on slavery and his ownership of slaves were complex. James Madison grew up on a plantation that made use of slave labor. He viewed slavery as a necessary part of the Southern economy, though he was troubled by the instability of a society that depended on a large slave population. [1] Contents 1 Views

    • Biography
    • Marriage and Family
    • American Revolutionary War

    Col. James Madison Sr. was the son of planter and politician Ambrose Madisonand his wife Frances Taylor, and was born in 1723 in Orange County, Virginia. When he was nine, his family moved to their new plantation of Mount Pleasant in 1732. His father had hired slaves and an overseer to clear it, work that had been going on for five years to establi...

    Madison married Nelly Conway (Port Conway, Caroline County, Virginia, January 9, 1731 – Montpelier, Orange County, Virginia, February 11, 1829), also of the planter class (her birthplace was named after her family). They had twelve children: 1. James Madison(March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) 2. Francis Taylor Madison (June 18, 1753 – April 5, 1800) 3...

    During the American Revolution, Madison was chairman of the Orange County Committee of Safety. He was commissioned as a colonel in the Virginia militia.

  5. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. ... James Madison. 4th President of the United States. In office March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1817:

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