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  1. Croatian Latin literature - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croatian_latinistic_literature

    Croatian Latin literature (or Croatian Latinism) is a term referring to literary works, written in the Latin language, which have evolved in present-day Croatia since the 9th century AD. Since that time, both public and private documents have been written in a local variant of medieval Latin .

  2. Zagreb - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zagrib

    Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level. The estimated population of the city in 2018 was 804,507. The population of the Zagreb urban agglomeration is 1,086,528, approximately a quarter of the total population of Croatia. Zagreb is a city with a rich history dating from Roman times.

  3. Catherine Kosača (1425-1478) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Catherine_Kosača...

    Biography She was born c. 1425 in Blagaj, the seat of her mighty father Stjepan Vukčić, most powerful amongst Bosnian nobility, and died on 25 November 1478 exiled in Rome. Her mother was Jelena Balšić, granddaughter of Prince Lazar of Serbia.

    • 25 October 1478 Rome, Italy
    • Jelena Balšić (?-1453)
    • Stjepan Vukčić Kosača (1404-1466)
    • Stephen Thomas of Bosnia (?-1463)
  4. Mladen III Šubić of Bribir

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/11755355

    Wikipedia  Mladen III Šubić of Bribir. Mladen III Šubić of Bribir; Gravestone in the Trogir Cathedral. Predecessor: Mladen II: Successor: Jelena Šubić: Reign ...

  5. Prince Marko | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Prince_Marko
    • Life
    • in Folk Poetry
    • in Legends
    • in Modern Culture
    • See Also

    Until 1371

    Marko was born around 1335 as the first son of Vukašin Mrnjavčević and his wife, Alena. The patronymic "Mrnjavčević" derives from Mrnjava, described by 17th-century Ragusan historian Mavro Orbin as a minor nobleman from Zachlumia (in present-day Herzegovina and southern Dalmatia). According to Orbin, Mrnjava's sons were born in Livno in western Bosnia, where he could have moved to after Zachlumia was annexed from Serbia by Bosnia in 1326. The Mrnjavčević familyn.b.1 may have later supported S...

    After 1371

    When his father died, "young king" Marko legally became a king and the co-ruler of Emperor Uroš. The end of the Nemanjić dynasty came soon afterwards, when Uroš died on 2 or 4 December 1371, which formally made Marko the sovereign of the Serbian state. Serbian lords, however, did not even consider to recognise him as their supreme ruler, and the separatism within the state increased even more. After the demise of the two brothers and the destruction of their armies, the Mrnjavčević family was...

    Serbian epic poetry

    Marko Mrnjavčević is the most popular hero of Serbian epic poetry, in which he is referred to as Kraljević Marko; with the word kraljević meaning "prince", or "king's son". This informal title was often attached to the names of King Vukašin's sons in contemporary sources. It was also used post-positively as a surname: Marko Kraljević.n.b.3The title/surname was adopted by Serbian oral tradition, and became an integral part of the hero's name. Poems about Kraljević Marko are not sequels that co...

    Epic poetry of Bulgaria and Macedonia

    "Krali Marko" has been one of the most popular characters in Bulgarian folklore for centuries. Bulgarian epic tales in general and those about Marko in particular seem to originate from the southwestern part of the Bulgarian ethnic area,much of it on the territory of the present-day Republic of Macedonia. Therefore, the same tales are also seen as part of the ethnic heritage of the present-day Macedonian nation. According to local legends, Marko's mother was Evrosiya (Евросия), sister of the...

    South Slavic legends about Kraljević Marko or Krali Marko are mostly based on mythological motifs that are much older than the historical Marko Mrnjavčević. There are differences between the hero's image in the legends and that in the folk poems. In some areas he was imagined as a giant who walked stepping on hilltops, his head knocking the clouds. It was also narrated that he helped God in shaping the Earth in ancient times, and created the river gorge of Demir Kapija ("Iron Gate") with a stroke of his sabre. Thus he drained the sea that covered the regions of Bitola, Mariovo, and Tikvešin Macedonia, which enabled people to inhabit them. After the Earth was shaped, he took to arrogantly showing off his strength. God took it away from him by leaving a bag as heavy as the Earth on a road: when Marko tried to lift it, he lost his gigantic strength and became an ordinary man. Legends also have it that the hero acquired his strength after he was suckled by a vila. King Vukašin threw his...

    In the 19th century, Marko was the subject of multiple dramatizations. In 1831, the Hungarian drama Prince Marko was shown in Budim, possibly written by István Balog and in 1838, the Hungarian drama Prince Marko – Great Serbian Hero by Celesztin Pergő was shown in Arad. In 1848, Jovan Sterija Popović wrote the tragedy The Dream of Prince Marko which has the legend of sleeping Marko as its central motif. Petar Preradović wrote the drama Kraljević Marko which glorifies the strength of the South Slavs. In 1863, Francesco Dall'Ongaro presented his Italian drama Resurrection of Prince Marko. Of all the epic or historical figures of Serbian history, Marko is considered to have given the most inspiration to visual artists: a monograph on the subject lists 87 authors. The oldest known depictions of Marko are 14th century frescoes from Marko's Monastery and Prilep. From 18th century a drawing of Marko on parchment is preserved in the Čajniče Gospel, reminiscent of the style of stećci reliefs...

    Djemo the Mountaineer
    General Vuča
  6. prince marko : definition of prince marko and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/prince marko/en-en

    A girl of the Croatian House of Šubić from Dalmatia, was sent by her father Grgur to the court of their relative Tvrtko I, the ban of Bosnia, to be raised and suitably married by Tvrtko's mother Jelena. The latter was daughter of George II Šubić (Juraj II), whose maternal grandfather was Serbian King Dragutin Nemanjić. [17]

  7. olga sober : définition de olga sober et synonymes de olga ...

    dictionnaire.sensagent.leparisien.fr/olga+sober/en-en

    Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately. (October 2009) Olga Sober ( Šober) , born in Sarajevo, graduated from singer class of Prof. Zlatko Šir at the Music Academy, Zagreb and Hochschule für Musik und Daarstelende Kunst in Vienna (the class of world famous tenor, Kammersänger ...

  8. Review: - Croatian players in Yugoslavian national team ...

    www.bigsoccer.com/threads/croatian-players-in...

    Sep 04, 2011 · Famous Bosniaks: Tvrtko I. OK, let's see his biography, who he is, shall we? Tvrtko I of Bosnia: Stjepan (Stephen) Tvrtko I (5 August 1338 – 10 March 1391) was a ruler of medieval Bosnia. He ruled in 1353–1366 and again in 1367–1377 as Ban and in 1377–1391 as the first Bosnian King.

  9. gatantatemoのブログ - 楽天ブログ

    plaza.rakuten.co.jp/gatantatemo

    Other famous people named Juraj include celebrities like Juraj Križanić and Juraj #19 Juraj V Zrinski Juraj V. Zrinski (na mađarskom: Zrínyi György; Čakovec, 31. Siječnja 1599. Požun, 28. Prosinca 1626.), hrvatski ban i vojskovođa. Juraj V Zrinski was a Croatian Ban (viceroy), warrior and member of the Zrinski noble family. Biography ...

  10. Name

    db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net/en/Zagreb

    The oldest settlement located near today's Zagreb was a Roman town of Andautonia, now Šćitarjevo, which existed between the 1st and the 5th century AD. The first recorded appearance of the name Zagreb is dated to 1094, at which time the city existed as two different city centres: the smaller, eastern Kaptol, inhabited mainly by clergy and housing Zagreb Cathedral, and the larger, western ...

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