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  1. Jennifer Jenkins is a Clinical Professor of Law teaching intellectual property and Director of Duke's Center for the Study of the Public Domain, where she heads its Arts Project - a project analyzing the effects of intellectual property on cultural production, and writes its annual Public Domain Day website.

  2. Jennifer Jenkins | Scholars@Duke

    scholars.duke.edu/person/jenkins

    Jennifer Jenkins is a Clinical Professor of Law teaching intellectual property and Director of Duke's Center for the Study of the Public Domain, where she heads its Arts Project - a project analyzing the effects of intellectual property on cultural production.

  3. Jennifer Jenkins | Scholars@Duke

    scholars.duke.edu/display/per2006252

    Jennifer Jenkins is a Clinical Professor of Law teaching intellectual property and Director of Duke's Center for the Study of the Public Domain, where she heads its Arts Project - a project analyzing the effects of intellectual property on cultural production.

  4. Duke Law School - Jennifer Jenkins, director of the Center ...

    www.facebook.com/dukelaw/posts/10157686860716847

    Duke Law School 11 hrs · Jennifer Jenkins, director of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain, tells NPR releasing works into the public domain feeds creativity and human insight.

  5. Jennifer Jenkins | Berkman Klein Center

    cyber.harvard.edu/people/jennifer-jenkins

    Aug 31, 2020 · Jenkins received her J.D. from Duke Law School, M.A. in English from Duke University, and B.A. from Rice University. While in practice, she was a member of the team that defended the copyright infringement suit against the publisher of the novel The Wind Done Gone (a parodic rejoinder to Gone with the Wind).

  6. Jan 01, 2021 · "That means that copyright has expired," explains Jennifer Jenkins, a law professor at Duke University who directs its Center for the Study of the Public Domain. "And all of the works are free for ...

  7. Public Domain Day 2021 | Duke University School of Law

    web.law.duke.edu/cspd/publicdomainday

    By Jennifer Jenkins, Director of Duke's Center for the Study of the Public Domain. January 1, 2021 is Public Domain Day: Works from 1925 are open to all! On January 1, 2021, copyrighted works from 1925 will enter the US public domain,1 where they will be free for all to use and build upon.

    • About The Book
    • About The Authors
    • Why An Open Coursebook Project?
    • Frequently Asked Questions

    This book is an introduction to intellectual property law, the set of private legal rights that allows individuals and corporations to control intangible creations and marks—from logos to novels to drug formulae—and the exceptions and limitations that define those rights. It focuses on the three main forms of US federal intellectual property—trademark, copyright and patent—but many of the ideas discussed here apply far beyond those legal areas and far beyond the law of the United States. The book is intended to be a textbook for the basic Intellectual Property class, but because it is an open coursebook, which can be freely edited and customized, it is also suitable for an undergraduate class, or for a business, library studies, communications or other graduate school class. Each chapter contains cases and secondary readings and a set of problems or role-playing exercises involving the material. The problems range from a video of the Napsteroral argument to counseling clients about...

    James Boyle is William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at Duke Law School and the former Chairman of the Board of Creative Commons. His other books include The Public Domain: Enclosing the Commons of the Mind, Shamans, Software and Spleens: Law and the Construction of the Information Society and two educational graphic novels, Bound By Law and Theft: A History of Music(with Jennifer Jenkins). Jennifer Jenkins is Clinical Professor of Law (Teaching) at Duke Law School and the Director of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain. Her recent articles include In Ambiguous Battle: The Promise (and Pathos) of Public Domain Day and Last Sale? Libraries' Rights in the Digital Age. She is the co-author, with James Boyle, of Bound By Law and Theft! A History of Music.

    From the Introduction: “Why do we do this? Partly, we do it because we think the price of legal casebooks and materials is obscene. Law students, who are already facing large debt burdens, are required to buy casebooks that cost $150–$200, and “statutory supplements” that consist mainly of unedited, public domain, Federal statutes for $40 or $50. The total textbook bill for a year can be over $1500. This is not a criticism of casebook authors, but rather of the casebook publishing system. We know well that putting together a casebook is a lot of work and can represent considerable scholarship and pedagogic innovation. We just put together this one and we are proud of it. But we think that the cost is disproportionate and that the benefit flows disproportionately to conventional legal publishers. Some of those costs might have been more justifiable when we did not have mechanisms for free worldwide and almost costless distribution. Some might have been justifiable when we did not hav...

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