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  1. John George | Encyclopedia.com

    www.encyclopedia.com › john-george

    John George, 1585–1656, elector of Saxony (1611–56). A drunkard, he nonetheless ruled the leading German Protestant state during the Thirty Years War. He vacillated in his policy between support of the Holy Roman Empire against the Lutheran princes and aid to his fellow Lutherans.

  2. John George | Infoplease

    www.infoplease.com › history › german

    John George, 1585–1656, elector of Saxony (1611–56). A drunkard, he nonetheless ruled the leading German Protestant state during the Thirty Years War . He vacillated in his policy between support of the Holy Roman Empire against the Lutheran princes and aid to his fellow Lutherans.

  3. John George | Article about John George by The Free Dictionary

    encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com › John+George

    John George, 1585–1656, elector of Saxony (1611–56). A drunkard, he nonetheless ruled the leading German Protestant state during the Thirty Years War Thirty Years War, 1618–48, general European war fought mainly in Germany. General Character of the War. There were many territorial, dynastic, and religious issues that figured in the outbreak and conduct of the war.

  4. List of big-game hunters - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_big-game_hunters
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia
    • Europe
    • North America
    • South America
    • See Also

    Bunny Allen

    Frank Maurice "Bunny" Allen (1906–2002) was an English-born professional safari guide in Kenya. Born in Buckinghamshire, as a young boy Allen learnt to poach game, gaining the nickname "Bunny" for his skill at snaring rabbits. In 1927 Allen followed his older brothers to Kenya. Managing a farm Allen would take guests of the owner on shoots, bringing him to the attention of Bror von Blixen-Finecke and Denys Finch Hatton. Allen soon became one of Finch Hatton’s guns on shoots, including the Pri...

    Yank Allen

    George "Yank" Allen (1867–1924) was an American born professional lion hunter in Northern and Southern Rhodesia in the early 20th century. Allen was originally a Texan cowboy who reputedly left the United States as a result of a gunfight, first travelling to South America before arriving in Southern Africa in 1900. Renowned as an eccentric, Allen was quite contemptuous of lions, never referring to them as lions but instead calling them "dawgs" that did not roar but instead "bawled". Allen sup...

    Major G.H. Anderson

    Major Gordon H. "Andy" Anderson (1878–1946) was a British soldier, elephant hunter and safari guide. Anderson commenced big game hunting in 1909 and elephant hunting in 1912, after meeting lifelong friend Jim Sutherland. Over the course of his life Anderson shot between 350 and 400 elephants, his favourite calibres for elephant hunting being the .577 Nitro Express, the .470 Nitro Express and the .318 Westley Richards. From 1921 Anderson also started acting as a professional safari guide, he m...

    Donald Anderson

    Donald Malcolm Stuart Anderson (1934–2014) was an Anglo-Indian big game hunter, angler and naturalist. The son of Kenneth Anderson, Donald shot his first leopard at the age of 13 and over the course of his life shot numerous elephant, tiger, leopard, bear, gaur, wild boar and deer, reluctantly giving up hunting in 1972 with the passing of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act. Donald gained fame from his contributions to his father's writings, describing several hunts for rogue and man-eating ti...

    Kenneth Anderson

    Kenneth Douglas Stuart Anderson (1910–1974) was a British Indian hunter, writer and naturalist. Born into a family of Scottish descent that had been in India for several generations, Anderson was a civil servant in Bangalore whose main pastime was watching and hunting game in the forests of Southern India. On behalf of the government, Anderson shot a number of man-eating tigers and leopards as well as rogue bears and elephants that had threatened and killed local villagers, official records f...

    Sir Samuel Baker

    Sir Samuel White Baker (1821–1893) was an English explorer, soldier, naturalist, big game hunter, engineer, writer and abolitionist. Growing up on a country estate where he learnt to shoot, following a period in Mauritius Baker travelled to Ceylon in 1846 to satisfy his craving for wild sport, remaining there with some interruptions until 1855. Between 1861 and 1873 Baker conducted several trips to Africa to hunt, explore and on one occasion abolish some slave markets, in 1879 he started a th...

    Paddy Cahill

    Patrick "Paddy" Cahill (c.1863–1923) was an Australian buffalo shooter, farmer and protector of aboriginies. Born in Laidley, Queensland, in 1883 Paddy and his brothers joined Nat Buchanan in droving 20,000 head of cattle from Townsville, Queensland to Wave Hill Station in the Northern Territory, a task that took 54 weeks. Attracted by reports of up to 60,000 buffalo running wild on the plains of the Alligator River, during the dry season Cahill and his partner William Johnston hunted buffalo...

    Tom Cole

    Thomas Edward "Tom" Cole (1906–1995) was an English born Australian stockman, horse-breaker, brumby runner, drover, buffalo shooter, crocodile shooter, coffee grower and author. Arriving in Australia in 1923, Cole worked on various cattle stations in Queensland and the Northern Territory before taking up droving for a year, then breaking horses at Banka Banka Station. After a short time running brumbies on Inverway Station, in 1932 Cole started hunting buffalo for their hides. In 1933 Cole pu...

    Joe Cooper

    Robert Joel "Joe" Cooper (1860–1936) was an Australian buffalo hunter. Born near Riverton in South Australia, between 1878 and 1881, with his brother Harry, Cooper arrived in the Northern Territory and for several years engaged in timber-getting and buffalo shooting on the Cobourg Peninsula and surrounding areas. In 1893 the brothers and Edward Robinson made an exploratory foray to Melville Island where, despite local aboriginal hostility, they found thousands of buffalo. In 1895 Cooper retur...

    William the Conqueror

    William I (c.1028–1087) was King of England from 1066 to 1087. Few hunting details have survived about William except that he was a keen huntsman whose introduction of royal forests and forest law to England (including the creation of the New Forest) have left an enduring impact on the ecology of that country to the present day. William of Malmesbury stated William’s hunting was a form of relaxation to escape the pressures of daily business, the chronicler Ordericus Vitalis wrote that William...

    Louis XV of France

    Louis XV (1710–1774) was King of France from 1715 to 1774. To the King hunting was an all-absorbing affair, in 1722 he drove from his coronation to his first hunt in the Villers-Cotterêts forest and by 1725 he hunted 276 days in the year and in that same year he was at the death of 362 kills, having ridden 3,121 leagues (12,166 km) behind his hounds. The King hunted with a huge pack of hounds called The Great Pack, made up of 40 to 90 couples (80 to 180 hounds) of different breeds, the number...

    Victor Emmanuel II of Italy

    Victor Emmanuel II (1820–1878) was King of Sardinia from 1849 to 1861 and King of Italy from 1861 to 1878. The King is credited with saving the Alpine ibex from extirpation from the Alps by creating the Royal Hunting Reserve of the Gran Paradiso in 1856. At the time of its creation there were estimated to be only 60 animals remaining in the Alps, the creation of the park and the appointment of a staff of 55 game keepers to watch and ward the remaining animals saw their numbers climb to betwee...

    Holt Collier

    Holt Collier (c.1848–1936) was a one time slave, soldier, cowboy and famed bear hunter. Collier was born a slave of the Hinds family of Mississippi, from a very young age he cared for the family's pack of hounds and at the age of 10 he moved to their Plum Ridge Plantation in a rugged wilderness area of Washington County, where he was responsible for providing meat for the plantation's workers, he is believed to have killed his first bear that time. At the age of 14 Collier ran away to follow...

    General Wade Hampton

    Lieutenant General Wade Hampton (1818–1902) was a Confederate soldier, South Carolina politician and plantation owner. Inheriting a significant fortune and significant landholdings in South Carolina and Mississippi, Hampton was a very keen hunter of wild game on his plantations, particularly one plantation located near Greenville in northern Mississippi. Over the course of his life Hampton is thought to have been at the death of over 500 black bears, at least two thirds of which he killed him...

    Ernest Hemingway

    Ernest Miller Hemingway (1899–1961) was an American novelist, short story writer, journalist and sportsman. Introduced to fishing and hunting by his father when he was four years old, Hemingway maintained a lifelong love of both pursuits, trout fishing and duck shooting in various locations, deep sea fishing for marlin and tuna in the Gulf Stream and big game hunting in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming as well as conducting two safaris in East Africa with Philip Percival as his guide. Hemingway sho...

    Sasha Siemel

    Alexander "Sasha" Siemel (1890–1970) was a Latvian born South American adventurer, guide, actor, writer and jaguar hunter. At a young age, Siemel followed his brother Ernest to Argentina, in 1914 he moved on to the Pantanal of Brazil. Killing his first jaguar (with a spear) in 1925, Siemel became a bounty hunter for ranchers who had suffered severe losses of cattle to jaguar predation. An avid self-promoter, Siemel was famous in his own lifetime through numerous newsreels and articles, in 195...

  5. Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Charles_VI,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Biography
    • Titles, Styles, Honours and Arms
    • References

    Early years

    Archduke Charles (baptized Carolus Franciscus Josephus Wenceslaus Balthasar Johannes Antonius Ignatius), the second son of the Emperor Leopold I and of his third wife, Princess Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg, was born on 1 October 1685. His tutor was Anton Florian, Prince of Liechtenstein. Following the death of Charles II of Spain, in 1700, without any direct heir, Charles declared himself King of Spain—both were members of the House of Habsburg. The ensuing War of the Spanish Succession, whic...

    Succession to the Habsburg dominions

    Lack of sons irked Charles and eventually led to the promulgation of the Pragmatic Sanction of 1713, a document which abolished male-only succession (hitherto effective in all the Habsburg realms except for Hungary, where Charles only succeeded to get it approved in 1723) and declared his lands indivisible. The Emperor favoured his own daughters over those of his elder brother and predecessor, Joseph I, in the succession, ignoring the Mutual Pact of Succession he had signed during the reign o...

    Death and legacy

    At the time of Charles' death, the Habsburg lands were saturated in debt; the exchequer contained a mere 100,000 florins; and desertion was rife in Austria's sporadic army, spread across the Empire in small, ineffective barracks.Contemporaries expected that Austria-Hungary would wrench itself from the Habsburg yoke upon his death. The Emperor, after a hunting across the Hungarian border in «a typical day in the wettest and coldest October in memory», fell seriously ill at the Favorita Palace,...

    Titles and styles

    1. 1 October 1685 – 12 October 1711 His Royal Highness The Archduke Charles of Austria 1.1. 1 November 1700 – 12 October 1711 His MajestyThe King of Spain 2. 12 October 1711 – 20 October 1740 His Imperial MajestyThe Holy Roman Emperor

    Titles

    Full titles of Charles as the emperor and ruler of Habsburg lands as well as a pretender to the Spanish throne went as follows: Charles, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King in Germany, of Castile, Aragon, Leon, both Sicilies, Jerusalem, Hungary, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Rama, Serbia, Galitia, Lodomeria, Cumania, Navarra, Grenada, Toledo, Valencia, Galicia, Majorca, Sevilla, Sardinia, Cordova, Corsica, Murcia, Jaen, the Algarve, Algeciras, Gibralta...

    Crankshaw, Edward: Maria Theresa, 1969, Longman publishers, Great Britain (pre-dates ISBN)
    Jones, Colin: The Great Nation: France from Louis XV to Napoleon, University of Columbia Press, Great Britain, 2002, ISBN 0-231-12882-7
    Fraser, Antonia: Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of The Sun King, Orion books, London, 2006, ISBN 978-0-7538-2293-7
    Mahan, J.Alexander: Maria Theresa of Austria, Crowell publishers, New York, 1932 (pre-dates ISBN)
  6. Alphabetical Browse - Encyclopedia Britannica

    www.britannica.com › sitemap › j

    John George II, elector of Saxony (1657–80), under whom Dresden became the musical centre of Germany. In 1657, just after his accession, he made an arrangement with his three brothers with the object of preventing disputes over their separate territories, and in 1664 he entered into friendly

  7. Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Charles_VII,_Archduke_of
    • Biography
    • References
    • External Links

    Early years

    Archduke Charles (baptized Carolus Franciscus Josephus Wenceslaus Balthasar Johannes Antonius Ignatius), the second son of the Emperor Leopold I and of his third wife, Princess Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg, was born on 1 October 1685. His tutor was Anton Florian, Prince of Liechtenstein. Following the death of Charles II of Spain, in 1700, without any direct heir, Charles declared himself King of Spain—both were members of the House of Habsburg. The ensuing War of the Spanish Succession, whic...

    Succession to the Habsburg dominions

    When Charles succeeded his brother in 1711, he was the last male Habsburg heir in the direct line. Since Habsburg possessions were subject to Salic law, barring women from inheriting in their own right, his own lack of a male heir meant they would be divided on his death. The Pragmatic Sanctionof 19 April 1713 abolished male-only succession in all Habsburg realms and declared their lands indivisible, although Hungary only approved it in 1723. Charles had three daughters, Maria Theresa (1717-1...

    Death and legacy

    At the time of Charles' death, the Habsburg lands were saturated in debt; the exchequer contained a mere 100,000 florins; and desertion was rife in Austria's sporadic army, spread across the Empire in small, ineffective barracks.Contemporaries expected that Austria-Hungary would wrench itself from the Habsburg yoke upon his death. Despite the predicaments faced by Charles, the territorial extent of his Habsburg lands was at its greatest since the days of his cognatic ancestor Emperor Charles...

    Crankshaw, Edward: Maria Theresa, 1969, Longman publishers, Great Britain (pre-dates ISBN)
    Jones, Colin: The Great Nation: France from Louis XV to Napoleon, University of Columbia Press, Great Britain, 2002, ISBN 0-231-12882-7
    Fraser, Antonia: Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of The Sun King, Orion books, London, 2006, ISBN 978-0-7538-2293-7
    Mahan, J.Alexander: Maria Theresa of Austria, Crowell publishers, New York, 1932 (pre-dates ISBN)
    Media related to Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperorat Wikimedia Commons
    Literature by and about Charles VI in the German National Librarycatalogue
    Works by and about Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor in the Deutsche Digitale Bibliothek(German Digital Library)
    Charles VI in Austria-Forum (in German)(at AEIOU)
  8. New acquisitions | Rare Book Collections @ Princeton

    blogs.princeton.edu › rarebooks › category

    “A monumental historical and genealogical work presented to John George (1525-1598), Elector of Brandenburg, a member of the House of Hohenzollern, and Augustus I (1526-1586), Elector of Saxony, of the House of Wettin.

  9. Rare Book Collections - Princeton University

    blogs.princeton.edu › rarebooks › page

    “A monumental historical and genealogical work presented to John George (1525-1598), Elector of Brandenburg, a member of the House of Hohenzollern, and Augustus I (1526-1586), Elector of Saxony, of the House of Wettin.

  10. Saxe-Weimar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Duchy_of_Saxe-Weimar

    Saxe-Weimar (German: Sachsen-Weimar) was one of the Saxon duchies held by the Ernestine branch of the Wettin dynasty in present-day Thuringia. The chief town and capital was Weimar . The Weimar branch was the most genealogically senior extant branch of the House of Wettin .

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