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  1. House of Hohenzollern - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hohenzollern

    Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick Barbarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180, and through his marriage was granted the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI in 1192. In about 1185 he married Sophia of Raabs, the daughter of Conrad II, Burgrave of Nuremberg.

  2. Principality of Bayreuth - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margrave_of_Bayreuth

    The principality arose upon the death of the Hohenzollern burgrave Frederick V of Nuremberg on 21 January 1398, when his lands were partitioned between his two sons: the elder, Burgrave John III received Kulmbach-Bayreuth and the younger, Frederick VI, received the Principality of Ansbach.

  3. Frederick I, Elector of Brandenburg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_I,_Margrave_of...

    Frederick was born in Nuremberg, the second-born son of Burgrave Frederick V (1333–1398) and the Wettin princess Elisabeth of Meissen.He entered early into the service of his brother-in-law, the Habsburg duke Albert III of Austria.

  4. Bavarian War (1420–1422) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_War_(1420–1422)

    The conflict escalated into a war when an army from Bavaria-Ingolstadt burned down the castle of the Burgrave of Nuremberg. John III, who had succeeded his brother William II as Duke of Bavaria-Straubing in 1418, remained neutral. Destruction. The village of Neidertshofen near Gaimersheim was probably

  5. House of Hohenzollern | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/House_of_Hohenzollern
    • Origins
    • Counts of Zollern
    • Franconian Branch
    • Brandenburg-Prussian Branch
    • Swabian Senior Branch
    • Kings of The Romanians
    • Coat of Arms of The Hohenzollerns, Brandenburg, Prussia, and The German Empire
    • See Also
    • External Links

    One of the most prominent ruling houses in the history of Europe, the Hohenzollern Dynasty played a major role in the history of Germany from the late Middle Ages until the end of World War I. It takes its name from a castle in Swabia first mentioned as Zolorin or Zolre (the modern Hohenzollern, south of Tübingen, in the Land Baden-Württemberg).

    The oldest known mention of the Zollern was in 1061 by Berthold of Reichenau. It was a county, ruled by the counts of Zollern, whose descent has been attempted to be linked (without success) to the Burchardingerdynasty. 1. until 1061: Burkhard I 2. before 1125: Frederick I 3. between ca. 1125 and 1142: Frederick II, eldest son of Frederick I:XLI 4. between ca. 1143 and 1150-1155: Burkhard II, 2nd oldest son of Frederick I:XLI 5. between ca. 1150-1155 and 1160: Gotfried of Zimmern, 4th oldest son of Frederick I:XLI 6. before 1171 – c. 1200: Frederick III/I (son of Frederick II, also Burgrave of Nuremberg) Count Frederick III of Zollern was a loyal retainer of the Holy Roman Emperors Frederick Barbarossa and Henry VI, and around 1185 he married Sophia of Raabs, the daughter of Conrad II, Burgrave of Nuremberg. After the death of Conrad II, often referred to as Kurt II who left no male heirs, Frederick III was granted the burgraviate of Nuremberg in 1192 as Burgrave Frederick I of Nure...

    The cadet Franconian branch of the House of Hohenzollern was founded by Conrad I, Burgrave of Nuremberg(1186-1261). Beginning in the 16th century, this branch of the family became Protestant and decided on expansion through marriage and the purchase of surrounding lands. The family supported the Hohenstaufen and Habsburgrulers of the Holy Roman Empire during the 12th to 15th centuries, and they were rewarded with several territorial grants. In the first phase, the family gradually added to their lands, at first with many small acquisitions in the Franconian and Bavarianregions of Germany: 1. Ansbachin 1331 2. Kulmbachin 1340 In the second phase, the family expanded their lands further with large acquisitions in the Brandenburg and Prussian regions of Germany and current Poland: 1. Margraviate of Brandenburgin 1417 2. Duchy of Prussiain 1618 These acquisitions eventually transformed the Hohenzollerns from a minor German princely family into one of the most important in Europe.

    Margraves of Brandenburg (1415–1819)

    1. 1415-1440 Frederick I 2. 1471-1486 Albrecht III Achilles 3. 1486-1499 John Cicero 4. 1499-1535 Joachim I Nestor 5. 1535-1571 Joachim II Hector 6. 1571-1598 John George 7. 1598-1608 Joachim III Frederick 8. 1608-1619 John Sigismund

    Margraves of Brandenburg-Küstrin (1535–1571)

    The short-lived Margraviate of Brandenburg-Küstrin was set up, against the Hohenzollern house laws on succession, as a secundogeniture fiefof the House of Hohenzollern, a typical German institution. 1. 1535–1571: John the Wise, Margrave of Brandenburg-Küstrin (son of Joachim I Nestor, Elector of Brandenburg) He died without issue. The Margraviate of Brandenburg-Küstrin was absorbed in 1571 into the Margraviate and Electorate of Brandenburg.

    Margraves of Brandenburg-Schwedt (1688–1788)

    From 1688 onwards the Margraves of Brandenburg-Schwedt were a side branch of the House of Hohenzollern. Though recognised as a branch of the main dynasty the Margraviate of Brandenburg-Schwedtnever constituted a principality with allodial rights of its own. 1. 1688–1711 : Philip William, Prince in Prussia, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt (son of Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg) 2. 1731–1771 : Frederick William, Prince in Prussia, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt (son of) 3. 1771–1788...

    The senior Swabian branch of the House of Hohenzollern was founded by Frederick II, Burgrave of Nuremberg. Ruling the minor German principalities of Hechingen, Sigmaringen and Haigerloch, this branch of the family decided to remain Roman Catholic and from 1567 onwards split into the Hohenzollern-Hechingen, Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen and Hohenzollern-Haigerloch branches. The Romanian branch of this family became Orthodox, starting from Ferdinand's I children. When the last count of Hohenzollern, Charles I of Hohenzollern(1512–1579) died, the territory was to be divided up between his three sons: 1. Eitel Frederick IV of Hohenzollern-Hechingen(1545–1605) 2. Charles II of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen(1547–1606) 3. Christopher of Hohenzollern-Haigerloch(1552–1592) They never expanded from these three Swabianprincipalities, which was one of the reasons they became relatively unimportant in German history for much of their existence. However, they kept royal lineage and married members of the g...

    Reigning (1866–1947)

    The Principality of Romania was established in 1862, after the Ottoman vassal states of Wallachia and Moldavia had been united in 1859 under Alexandru Ioan Cuza as Prince of Romania in a personal union. He was deposed in 1866 by the Romanian parliament which then invited a German prince of the Hohenzollern-Sigmaringenfamily, Charles, to become Prince of Romania under the name Prince Carol. In 1881 the Principality of Romania was proclaimed a Kingdom. For dynastic reasons, Carol's grandchildre...

    Succession (1947 until today)

    Michael has retained his claim on the defunct Romanian throne. At present, the claim is not recognised by Romania, a republic. At 10 May 2011, Michael severed all of the dynastic and historical ties between the House of Romaniaand the House of Hohenzollern.

    An article on the Coat of arms of Prussia can be found. The explanation of the shield can be found at Great Shield of the Kings of Prussia (German). Coat of arms of PrussiaCoat of arms of Germany

  6. House of Hohenzollern - The Reader Wiki, Reader View of Wikipedia

    thereaderwiki.com/en/House_of_Hohenzollern

    Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick Barbarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180, and through his marriage was granted the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI in 1192. In about 1185 he married Sophia of Raabs, the daughter of Conrad II, Burgrave of Nuremberg.

  7. The Nuremberg State Theatre (Staatstheater Nürnberg), founded in 1906, is dedicated to all types of opera, ballet and srage theatre. During the season 2009/2010, the theatre presented 651 performances for an audience of 240,000 persons. [12] The State Philharmonic Nuremberg (Staatsphilharmonie Nürnberg) is the

  8. Principality of Bayreuth

    ndtyjky.blogspot.com/2018/12/principality-of...

    John III, Burgrave of Nuremberg • 1769–91 (last) Christian Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach: Historical era: Middle Ages • Partitioned from ...

  9. County of Zollern

    db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net/en/House_of...

    Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick Barbarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180, and through his marriage was granted the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI in 1192. In about 1185 he married Sophia of Raabs, the daughter of Conrad II, Burgrave of Nuremberg.

  10. House of Hohenzollern - hyperleap.com

    hyperleap.com/topic/House_of_Hohenzollern

    Hohenzollern Castle (German: ) is the ancestral seat of the imperial House of Hohenzollern. It was founded on 1 January 1871 when the south German states, except for Austria, joined the North German Confederation and the new constitution came into force changing the name of the federal state to the German Empire and introduced the title of German Emperor for Wilhelm I, King of Prussia from the ...