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  1. Wurz is the youngest winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans; he was 22 years, 4 months and 1 day old when he won the 1996 race. The United Kingdom is the most represented event-winning country, having produced 33 overall victors, followed by France with 29 and Germany with 19.

  2. The 24 Hours of Le Mans (24 heures du Mans) is the world's oldest sports car endurance race and one of the most famous and influential in motorsports history. The winners of all events since 1923 are listed here. The race has been run every year since its inception with the exception of 1936, where the race was not run due to worker strikes. 1940 to 1948, due to World War II and 2020 edition ...

    Year
    Drivers
    Team
    Car
    2020
    [ [Image: Template:Country flag alias ...
    22x20px}}| Template:Country alias CHE ]] ...
    Toyota Gazoo Racing
    2019
    [ [Image: Template:Country flag alias ...
    22x20px}}| Template:Country alias CHE ]] ...
    Toyota Gazoo Racing
    2018
    [ [Image: Template:Country flag alias ...
    22x20px}}| Template:Country alias CHE ]] ...
    Toyota Gazoo Racing
    Timo Bernhard Brendon Hartley Earl ...
  3. automobile racing - automobile racing - Winners of 24 Hours of Le Mans: A list of 24 Hours of Le Mans winners is provided in the table. A list of Monte-Carlo Rally winners is provided in the table.

    Year
    Car
    Drivers
    2019
    Toyota TS050 Hybrid
    Fernando Alonso, Sébastien Buemi, ...
    2018
    Toyota TS050 Hybrid
    Fernando Alonso, Sébastien Buemi, ...
    2017
    Porsche 919 Hybrid
    Earl Bamber, Timo Bernhard, Brendon ...
    2016
    Porsche 919 Hybrid
    Romain Dumas, Neel Jani, Marc Lieb
  4. Jul 14, 2018 · Chenard & Walker Sport was the first to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1923. From this year on, it’s amusing to see that open top race cars rule the day, up until 1952 when Mercedes won with the ...

    • Jacob Oliva
    • Purpose
    • Race
    • Circuit
    • History
    • Innovations
    • Successful Marques and Drivers
    • Accidents
    • Coverage
    • Vintage Racing
    • See Also

    Launched when Grand Prix motor racing was the dominant form of motorsport throughout Europe, Le Mans was designed to present a different test. Instead of focusing on the ability of a car company to build the fastest machines, the 24 Hours of Le Mans would concentrate on the ability of manufacturers to build sporty yet reliable cars. This encouraged innovation in producing reliable and fuel-efficient vehicles, because endurance racingrequires cars that last and spend as little time in the pits as possible. At the same time, the layout of the track required cars with better aerodynamics and stability at high speeds. While this was shared with Grand Prix racing, few tracks in Europe had straights of a length comparable to the Mulsanne. Additionally, because the road is public and thus not as meticulously maintained as permanent racing circuits, racing puts more strain on the parts, increasing the importance of reliability. The oil crisis in the early 1970s led organizers to adopt a fue...

    The race is held in June, leading at times to very hot conditions for drivers, particularly in closed vehicles with poor ventilation; rain is commonly seen. The race begins in mid-afternoon and finishes the following day at the same hour the race started the previous day. Modern competitors often cover well over 5,000 km. The record is 2010's 5,410 km (3,360 mi), six times the length of the Indianapolis 500, or about 18 times longer than a Formula One Grand Prix. Drivers and racing teams strive for speed and avoiding mechanical damage, as well as managing the cars' consumables, primarily fuel, tires, and brakingmaterials. It also tests endurance, with drivers frequently racing for over two hours before a relief driver can take over during a pit stop while they eat and rest. Current regulations mandate that three drivers share each competing vehicle. Competing teams race in groups called "classes", or cars of similar specification, while also competing simultaneously for outright pla...

    The circuit on which the 24 Hours of Le Mans is run is named the Circuit de la Sarthe, after the department that Le Mans is within. It consists of both permanent track and public roads that are temporarily closed for the race. Since 1923, the track has been extensively modified, mostly for safety reasons, and now is 13.626 km (8.467 mi) in length. Although it initially entered the town of Le Mans, the track was cut short in order to better protect spectators. This led to the creation of the Dunlop Curve and Tertre Rouge corners before rejoining the old circuit on the Mulsanne. Another major change was on the Mulsanne itself in 1990, when the FIA decreed that it would no longer sanction any circuit that had a straight longer than 2 km (1.2 mi). To comply with this, two chicanes were added to the 6-kilometre-long (3.7 mi) straight. The addition of the chicanes was further influenced by the fact that the speed of WM P88-Peugeot French driver Roger Dorchy had been timed at 405 km/h (252...

    1923–1939

    The 24 Hours of Le Mans was first run on 26 and 27 May 1923, through public roads around Le Mans. Originally planned to be a three-year event awarded the Rudge-Whitworth Triennial Cup, with a winner being declared by the car which could go the farthest distance over three consecutive 24-hour races, this idea was abandoned in 1928 and overall winners were declared for each single year depending on who covered the farthest distance by the time 24 hours were up. The early races were dominated by...

    1949–1969

    Following the reconstruction of circuit facilities, the race was resumed in 1949 with renewed interest from major automobile manufacturers. 1949 was also Ferrari's first victory, the 166MM of Luigi Chinetti and Peter Mitchell-Thomson. After the formation of the World Sportscar Championship in 1953, of which Le Mans was a part, Ferrari, Aston Martin, Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar and many others began sending multiple cars backed by their respective factories to compete for overall wins against their...

    1970–1980

    For the new decade, the race took a turn towards more extreme speeds and automotive designs. These extreme speeds led to the replacement of the typical standing Le Mans start with a rolling Indianapolis start. Although production-based cars still raced, they were now in the lower classes while purpose-built sportscars became the norm. The Porsche 917, 935, and 936 were dominant throughout the decade, but a resurgence by French manufacturers Matra-Simca and Renault saw the first victories for...

    Le Mans has seen many innovations in automotive designto counteract the circuit's difficulties. These have either been dictated by rules or have been attempts by manufacturers to outwit the competition. Some innovations were incorporated into the common automobile.

    Over the years, many manufacturers have managed to take the overall win, while even more have taken class wins. The most successful marque in the history of the race is Porsche, which has taken nineteen overall victories, including seven in a row from 1981 to 1987 and 107 class victories. Audi is next with thirteen wins, and Ferrari follows with nine, also including six in a row from 1960 to 1965. Since 2000 Audi has dominated the event, winning 13 times in 15 years of participation. Audi and Team Joest have had two hat-tricks, the first being in 2000, 2001, and 2002. Jaguar has seven wins, while Bentley, Alfa Romeo, and Ford all won four races in a row, with Bentley recording two additional victories in other years. In 2018, Toyota became only the second Japanese marque to win, following Mazda in 1991. Mazda is also the only company to win with a rotary engine. After Porsche's total of 107 class victories, Ferrari has 37 and Aston Martin, Audi and Chevroleteach have 14. Three drive...

    Le Mans has seen a number of fatal accidents, due in part to the very high speed nature of all variants of the track throughout history. The largest one was in 1955, when 83 spectators and driver Pierre Levegh were killed. In the wake of the disaster, many races were cancelled, including the Grand Prix races in Germany, Spain, and Switzerland (the latter as a part of a blanket ban on motorsport round-track races that was maintained until 2018).The accident led to safety regulations in all motorsports for both driver and spectator protection. Almost all decades in which Le Mans has been run have seen their fair share of horrific accidents, such as in 1972 when Swede Jo Bonnier was catapulted into a forest surrounding the circuit after hitting a privately entered Ferrari near the Indianapolis section; Bonnier was killed instantly. The 1980s was a decade where some of the race's worst-ever accidents occurred. Although Armco barriers had been installed along the straight in 1969 there w...

    Motors TV covered the Le Mans 24 Hours in its entirety in 2006 and 2007, including coverage of the scrutineering, qualifying, driver parade, warmup, and race. In the United States, FOX owned SPEED Channel, followed by Fox Sports 1 and Fox Sports 2aired complete race coverage live either on-air or online through a combination of coverage from the French host broadcaster and its own pit reporting crew for a number of years. That deal ended after the 2017 season. A United States television deal was not done for the 2018–19 WEC Super Season because of a renegotiation of its European contract. In 2008, Eurosport secured a multi-year deal to show the entire race, including the qualifying and the motorcycle race. Every hour of the 2008 race was broadcast in segments on the main channel and on Eurosport 2, but in recent years, a couple of hours were missed due to scheduling clashes with other sporting events.[non-primary source needed] In addition, Eurosport provided live streaming on its w...

    Since 2001, the ACO has allowed the "Le Mans Legend" event to participate on the full Circuit de la Sarthe. These exhibition races involve classic cars that had previously run at Le Mans or are similar to ones that had. Each year, a particular era of cars may participate, with the featured era changing from year to year. Though most drivers in this event are amateurs, some noted professional drivers have appeared to race cars they had previously run, such as Stirling Moss and Derek Bell. Starting in 2002, the "Le Mans Classic" has been held as a biennial event on the full 13 km (8.1 mi) circuit in July. The races take place over a full 24-hour day/night cycle, with starts on set times allowing cars from the same era to compete at the same time. A team typically consists of a car in each class, and the team with the most points accumulated over five or six classes is declared the overall winner. The classes are based on the era in which the cars would have competed. The exact class r...

  5. Le Mans 1000 km: Le Mans Classic: Le Mans Series 6 Hours of Silverstone (ILMC) Le Mans Series Castellet 8 Hours: Le Mans Series Catalunya 1000 km: Le Mans Series Donnington 1000 km: Le Mans Series Istanbul 1000 km: Le Mans Series Jarama 1000 km: Le Mans Series Monza 1000 km: Le Mans Series Nurburgring 1000 km: Le Mans Series Valencia 1000 km ...

  6. Nov 13, 2008 · The 24 Hours of Le Mans (24 heures du Mans) is the world's oldest sports car endurance race and one of the most famous and influential in motorsports history.. The winners of all events since 1923 are listed here.

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