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    What are the most popular Christian denominations?

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    • Basis for Doctrine. Christian denominations differ in what they use for the basis of their doctrines and beliefs. The biggest split is between Catholicism and the denominations that have roots in the Protestant Reformation.
    • Creeds and Confessions. To understand what different Christian denominations believe, you can start with the ancient creeds and confessions, which spell out their major beliefs in a short summary.
    • Inerrancy and Inspiration of Scripture. Christian denominations differ in how they view the authority of Scripture. The Inspiration of Scripture identifies the belief that God, by the power of the Holy Spirit, directed the writing of the Scriptures.
    • The Trinity. The mysterious doctrine of the Trinity created divisions in the earliest days of Christianity and those differences remain in Christian denominations until this day.
    • Baptist. Alliance of Baptists. American Baptist. American Baptist Association. Baptist (Missionary) Baptist Bible Fellowship International. Baptist General Conference.
    • Methodist. African Methodist Episcopal. African Methodist Episcopal Zion. Christian Methodist Episcopal (CME) Free Methodist Church of North America.
    • Presbyterian. Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Presbyterian Church in America. Presbyterian Church in Canada.
    • Orthodox. Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese. Coptic Orthodox. Greek Orthodox. Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Toronto (Canada) Orthodox Church in America.
  2. Jun 22, 2012 · Pentecostalism/Charismatic (612,000,000) Click for beliefs. >> Assemblies of God (60,000,000) Click for beliefs. >> New Apostolic Church (11,200,000) Click for beliefs. >> Foursquare Church (8,000,000) Click for beliefs. >> Church of God in Christ (6,500,000) Click for beliefs. Baptist (100,000,000) Click for beliefs.

    • Terminology and Qualification
    • Historical Groups
    • Eastern Orthodox
    • Roman Catholic
    • Protestant
    • Miscellaneous
    • Parachurch
    • Ideologies

    Main article: Christianity Some bodies included on this list do not consider themselves denominations. For example, the Roman Catholic Church considers itself the one true church and the Holy See as pre-denominational. The Eastern Orthodox Church also considers itself the original Christian Church and pre-denominational. To express further the complexity involved, the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches were historically one and the same, as evidenced by the fact that they are the only two modern churches in existence to accept all of the first seven ecumenical councils, until differences arose, such as papal authority and dominance, the rise of the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the continuance of emperors in the Eastern Roman Empire, and the final and permanent split that occurred during the Crusades with the siege of Constantinople. This also illustrates that denominations can arise not only from religious or theological...

    Early Christian

    Main articles:Early Christianity, History of Early Christianity, and List of Gnostic sects Early Christianity is often divided into three different branches that differ in theology and traditions, which all appeared in the 1st century AD/CE. They include Jewish Christianity, Pauline Christianity and Gnostic Christianity. All modern Christian denominations are said to have descended from the Jewish and Pauline Christianities, with Gnostic Christianity dying, or being hunted, out of existence a...

    Late ancient and Medieval Christian

    Main articles: History of late ancient Christianity, History of Christianity during the Middle Ages, and State church of the Roman Empire The following are groups of Christians appearing between the First Council of Nicaea, the East-West Schism and Proto-Protestantism. 1. Agonoclita 2. Apostolic Brethren 3. Arnoldists 4. Beguines and Beghards 5. Bogomilism 5.1. Bosnian Church 5.2. Patarines 6. Brethren of the Free Spirit 7. Catharism 8. Donatism 9. Dulcinians 10. Friends of God 11. Henricans...

    Main articles: Eastern Orthodox Church, Eastern Orthodox Church organization, Eastern Orthodox theology, and Western Rite Orthodoxy The Eastern Orthodox Church, officially the Orthodox Catholic Church, claims continuity (based upon apostolic succession) with the early Church as part of the Imperial Roman Church. Though it considers itself pre-denominational, being the original Church of Christ before 1054, some scholars debate the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic churches began after the East-West Schism as the official State Church of the Roman Empire ceased to exist. The church has over 250 million members, making it the second largest church. Some of them have a disputed administrative status (i.e. their autonomy or autocephaly is only partially recognized), but all remain in communion with each other as one church though communion has broken throughout its history. Two examples of impaired communion between the Orthodox churches include the Moscow-Constantinople schisms of 19...

    Main articles: Catholic Church and Catholic particular churches and liturgical rites The Catholic Church, or Roman Catholic Church, is composed of 24 autonomous sui iuris particular churches: the Latin Church and the 23 Eastern Catholic Churches. It considers itself the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church that Christ founded, and which Saint Peter initiated along with the missionary work of Saint Paul and others. As such, the Roman Catholic Church does not consider itself a denomination, but rather considers itself pre-denominational, the original Church of Christ though it was once part of the Imperial Roman Church. Continuity is claimed based upon apostolic succession with the early Church. The Roman Catholic population exceeds 1.3 billion as of 2016.

    Main articles: Protestantism, Reformation, and List of the largest Protestant denominations Protestantism is a movement within Christianity which owes its name to the 1529 Protestation at Speyer, but is originated to the year 1517 when Martin Luther began his dispute with the Roman Catholic Church. This period of time, known as the Reformation, began a series of events resulting over the next 500 years in several newly denominated churches (listed below). Some denominations were started by intentionally dividing themselves from the Roman Catholic Church, such as in the case of the English Reformation while others, such as with Luther’s followers, were excommunicated after attempting reform. New denominations and organizations formed through further divisions within Protestant churches since the Reformation began. A denomination labeled “Protestant” subscribes to the fundamental Protestant principles—though not always—that is scripture alone, justification by faith alone, and the uni...

    Main article: Oriental Orthodoxy The following are independent and non-mainstream movements, denominations and organizations formed during various times in the history of Christianity by splitting from mainline Catholicism, Eastern or Oriental Orthodoxy, or Protestantism not classified in the previous lists.

    Main articles: Ecumenism and Parachurch organization Parachurch organizations are Christian faith-based organizations that work outside and across denominations to engage in social welfare and evangelism. These organizations are not churches but work with churches or represent a coalition of churches. 1. Action of Churches Together in Scotland 2. Bose Monastic Community 3. Byzantine Discalced Carmelites 4. Campus Crusade for Christ 5. Canadian Council of Churches 6. Christian Churches Together in the USA 7. Churches Together in Britain and Ireland 8. Churches Together in England 9. Churches Uniting in Christ 10. Conference of European Churches 11. Ecumenical Institute for Study and Dialogue 12. Edinburgh Churches Together 13. Fellowship of Saint Alban and Saint Sergius 14. Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 15. Iona Community 16. National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. 17. New Independent Fundamentalist Baptist 18. New Monasticism related Communities 19. Pentecostal...

    Main article: List of Christian movements A Christian movement is a theological, political, or philosophical interpretation of Christianity that is not necessarily represented by a specific church, sect, or denomination. 1. 24-7 Prayer Movement 2. Arianism 3. Arminianism 4. British Israelism 5. British New Church Movement 6. Calvinism 7. Campbellism 8. Charismatic movement 9. Christian atheism 10. Christian communism 11. Christian democracy 12. Christian existentialism 13. Christian Family Movement 14. Christian feminism 15. Christian identity (White Supremacist) 16. Christian left 17. Christian naturism 18. Christian pacifism 19. Christian right 20. Christian socialism 21. Christian Torah-submission 22. Christian vegetarianism 23. Christian Zionism 24. Confessing Movement 25. Continual Prayer Movement 26. Convergence Movement 27. Countercult Movement 28. Creationism 28.1. Old Earth Creationism 28.2. Young Earth Creationism 29. Distributism 30. Emerging Church Movement 31. Evangelic...

  3. Mar 05, 2005 · Compare Christian Denominations: Beliefs and Theology scripture. Contains all things necessary for salvation. ... Inspired and inerrant. ... The Bible is inspired. religious authority. Seven Ecumenical Councils. ... creeds. Trinity. Jesus. Mary. Theotokos ("God-Bearer"). Honored highly, but ...

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