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  1. Philippine Languages and Dialects - United Nations

    unstats.un.org › unsd › geoinfo

    Philippine languages generally use a Romanized writing system. It can be categorized into two groups: Spanish-based and Filipino-based. •KWF is propagating the use of Ortograpiyang Pambansa (2013) as the model for creating the orthographies of other Philippine Languages. •Some languages still use a Spanish-based system for certain aspects

  2. Languages of the Philippines - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Languages_of_the_Philippines

    Below is a chart of Philippine languages. While there have been misunderstandings on which ones should be classified as language and which ones should be classified as dialect, the chart confirms that most have similarities, yet are not mutually comprehensible. These languages are arranged according to the regions they are natively spoken (from ...

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  4. Philippines - Languages | Ethnologue

    www.ethnologue.com › country › PH

    Bikol, Libon. Bikol, Miraya. Bikol, Northern Catanduanes. Bikol, Rinconada. Bikol, Southern Catanduanes. Bikol, West Albay. Binukid. Binukidnon, Northern. Binukidnon, Southern.

  5. List of Philippine Dialects/Languages - Zamboanga

    www.zamboanga.com › html › Philippine_dialects_ethno
    • ADASEN (ADDASEN TINGUIAN, ADDASEN, ADASEN ITNEG) [TIU] 4,000 (NTM). Luzon, northeastern Abra Province. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Western Malayo-Polynesian, Northern Philippine, Northern Luzon, Northern Cordilleran, Ibanagic, Isnag.
    • AGTA, ALABAT ISLAND (ALABAT ISLAND DUMAGAT) [DUL] 50 (1979 SIL). East of Quezon Province, Luzon. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Western Malayo-Polynesian, Northern Philippine, Northern Luzon, Northern Cordilleran, Dumagat, Southern.
    • AGTA, CAMARINES NORTE (MANIDE, AGIYAN) [ABD] 200 (1979 SIL). Luzon, Santa Elena and Labo, Camarines Norte. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Western Malayo-Polynesian, Northern Philippine, Northern Luzon, Northern Cordilleran, Dumagat, Southern.
    • AGTA, CASIGURAN DUMAGAT (CASIGURAN DUMAGAT) [DGC] 1,000 (1979 SIL). East coast of Luzon, north Quezon Province. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Western Malayo-Polynesian, Northern Philippine, Northern Luzon, Northern Cordilleran, Dumagat, Northern.
  6. Languages and Dialects of the Philippines - Around The ...

    www.aroundphilippines.com › 2015 › 02

    Sep 07, 2017 · Cabalian, Kabalian, Cabalianon, or Kabalianon. Cagwaitnon. Calamian Tagbanwa. Capiznon. Castilla Bicol. Cebuano (Standard) Central Tagbanwa. Chabacano Caviteno. Chabacano de Davao.

  7. PHILIPPINE DIALECTS - The Many Dialects Of The Country

    philnews.ph › 2019/08/16 › list-philippine-dialects
    • English – One of the official languages of the Philippines and is being taught by schools.
    • Aklanon or Aklan – A language from Visayas that is native to the province of Aklan in the Island of Panay.
    • Asi or Bantoanon – A Visayan language which originated in Banton, Romblon.
    • Binol-anon or Boholano Cebuano – A version of the Cebuano language used in the province of Bohol and most parts of Southern Leyte.
  8. Dec 21, 2017 · Philippine languages: philippines, langues: Philippinisch-Austronesisch (Andere) phn : Phoenician: phénicien: Phönikisch: pli: pi: Pali: pali: Pali: pol: pl: Polish: polonais: Polnisch: pon : Pohnpeian: pohnpei: Ponapeanisch: por: pt: Portuguese: portugais: Portugiesisch: pra : Prakrit languages: prâkrit, langues: Prakrit: pro : Provençal, Old (to 1500);Occitan, Old (to 1500)

  9. List of regional languages of the Philippines - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › List_of_regional_languages

    This is the list of recognized regional languages in the Philippines as ordered and permitted by the Department of Education (Philippines) under the Mother Tongue-Based Multi-Lingual Education (MTB-MLE) strategy: Aklanon; Bikol; Cebuano; Chavacano; Hiligaynon; Ibanag; Ilocano; Ivatan; Kapampangan; Kinaray-a; Maguindanao; Maranao; Pangasinan; Sambal; Surigaonon; Tagalog; Tausug

  10. Philippine languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Philippine_languages
    • Classification
    • Vocabulary
    • See Also
    • Notes
    • References
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    History and criticism

    One of the first explicit classifications of a "Philippine" grouping based on genetic affiliation was in 1906 by Frank Blake, who placed them as a subdivision of the "Malay branch" within Malayo-Polynesian (MP), which at that time was considered as a family. Blake however encompasses every language within the geographic boundaries of the Philippine archipelago to be under a single group. Formal arguments in support of a specific "Proto-Philippines" were followed by Matthew Charles in 1974, Te...

    Internal classification

    The Philippine group is proposed to have originated from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian and ultimately from Proto-Austronesian. There have been several proposals as to the composition within the group, but the most widely accepted groupings today is the consensus classifications by Blust (1991; 2005) and Reid (2017); however, both disagree on the existence of a Philippine group as a single genetic unit.

    Comparison chart between several selected Philippine languages spoken from north to south with Proto-Austronesianfirst for comparison.

    1. ^Ambiguous relationship with other Northern Philippine groups
    2. ^ Ambiguous relationship with other Northern Philippine groups and has possible relationship with South Extension; equivalent to the widely established Batanicor Bashiic branch.

    K. Alexander Adelaar and Nikolaus Himmelmann, The Austronesian languages of Asia and Madagascar.Routledge, 2005.

    Fay Wouk and Malcolm Ross (ed.), The history and typology of western Austronesian voice systems.Australian National University, 2002.
    Reid, Lawrence A. (2013) "Who Are the Philippine Negritos? Evidence from Language." Human Biology: Vol. 85: Iss. 1, Article 15.
    Zorc, R. David. 1972. Field notes.
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