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  1. Ngina Kenyatta (née Muhoho; born 24 June 1933), popularly known as "Mama Ngina", is the former First Lady of Kenya. She is the widow of the Kenya's first president, Jomo Kenyatta (~1889–1978), and mother of the fourth president Uhuru Kenyatta who served from 2013 to 2022.

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Louis_LeakeyLouis Leakey - Wikipedia

    Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey (7 August 1903 – 1 October 1972) was a Kenyan-British palaeoanthropologist and archaeologist whose work was important in demonstrating that humans evolved in Africa, particularly through discoveries made at Olduvai Gorge with his wife, fellow palaeoanthropologist Mary Leakey.

  3. Walker is an English and German surname.. With close to 100,000 bearers, Walker is the 18th most common surname in England. As of the 2000 U.S. Census, 501,307 people had the surname Walker, making it the 28th most common surname in America.

  4. Heba Kotb (born 1967), sex therapist and host of The Big Talk, a sexual advice show; Jehane Ragai, chemist; Kent Weeks (born 1941), American Egyptologist, launched the Theban Mapping Project, which discovered the identity and vast dimensions of KV5, the tomb of the sons of Rameses II in the Valley of the Kings

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › April_8April 8 - Wikipedia

    2013 – Sara Montiel, Spanish-Mexican actress and singer (b. 1928) 2013 – José Luis Sampedro, Spanish economist and author (b. 1917) 2013 – Margaret Thatcher, English politician, first female Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (b. 1925) 2014 – Emmanuel III Delly, Iraqi patriarch (b. 1927)

  6. Margaret Caro (1848–1938) – first women Dentist on the Register of New Zealand; lecturer; social reformer, and writer; Alexander A. Clerk – Ghanaian-American teacher; psychiatrist; Sleep medicine specialist and the director of the world's first sleep medical clinic at Stanford University Medical Center

  7. "Ol' Man River" is a show tune from the 1927 musical Show Boat with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. The song contrasts the struggles and hardships of African Americans with the endless, uncaring flow of the Mississippi River.