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  1. Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, and as " Bloody Mary " by her Protestant opponents, was Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 and Queen of Spain from January 1556 until her death in 1558.

  2. www.history.com › topics › european-historyMary I - HISTORY

    Nov 9, 2009 · England’s first female monarch, Mary I (1516-1558) ruled for just five years. The only surviving child of Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, Mary took the throne after the...

  3. Mary I (r.1553-1558) | The Royal Family Mary I (r.1553-1558) Mary I was the first Queen Regnant (that is, a queen reigning in her own right rather than a queen through marriage to a king). Courageous and stubborn, her character was moulded by her early years.

    • Early Life
    • The Pretender: Lady Jane Grey
    • Mary Becomes Queen
    • Reversing The Reformation
    • Philip of Spain
    • The Wyatt Rebellion
    • The Spanish Marriage
    • 'Bloody Mary'
    • Death & Successor

    Mary was born on 18 February 1516 CE at Greenwich Palace, the daughter of Catherine of Aragon and Henry VIII. Mary had a younger half-sister, Elizabeth (b. Sep. 1533 CE), the daughter of Anne Boleyn(c. 1501-1536 CE). She also had a younger half-brother, Edward (b. Oct. 1537 CE), the son Henry's third wife, Jane Seymour (c. 1509-1537 CE). In 1531 CE...

    In July 1553 CE Edward VI died aged just 15 and so his short reign had been dominated by regency councils. The latter half of Edward's reign saw John Dudley, the Earl of Northumberland (l. 1504-1553 CE) run the government and, with Edward's approval, the English Reformation and abandonment of all things Catholic continued apace. With the king dying...

    Dudley had made two fatal mistakes. The first was not to secure Mary in the Tower of Londonor another suitable place of safekeeping. The second was to underestimate the feeling amongst nobles and commoners alike that royal blood and legitimacy were more important than any religious considerations. In addition, to accept the 'devise' was to put the ...

    Mary was the popular people's choice, how strange, then, that she became known as a despot and 'Bloody Mary.' The problem was that the queen had not understood her popularity lay in her legitimacy to rule as the daughter and sister of her two predecessors as monarch respectively. Mary convinced herself that she had gained the throne because God had...

    On 29 October 1553 CE, the queen announced her betrothal to Philip (l. 1527-1598 CE), son of King Charles V of Spain (r. 1516-1556 CE), England's Catholic enemy number one and a state growing ever-richer as it plundered the wealth of the New World. People now remembered that Mary's mother had been the daughter of King Ferdinand II of Aragon (r. 147...

    A rebel army from Kent led by Sir Thomas Wyatt marched on London on 25 January 1554 CE to stop the 'Spanish Marriage' and perhaps replace Mary with Elizabeth as queen. Elizabeth would then marry Edward Courtenay, the great-grandson of Edward IV of England (r. 1461-1470 CE). As Wyatt put it, he did not want to see England become "a cockleboat towed ...

    The English Parliament was not keen on religious reforms if they undermined the wealth of the nobility but it did pass Mary's First Act of Repeal in October 1553 CE which reversed all the religious-aimed legislation of Edward VI. Parliament was certainly against the idea that the queen marry a foreigner, especially a Spaniard but Mary finally acqui...

    On 20 November 1554 CE the papal legate Cardinal Reginald Pole had formally pronounced absolution and that England and the Papacy were now at peace. These were fine words but bloody deeds would follow yet. The queen pushed through Parliament the Second Act of Repeal in January 1555 CE which abolished all post-1529 CE legislation concerning religiou...

    Mary, aged 42, died of stomach cancer on 17 November 1558 CE at Saint James' Palace. The queen's death was celebrated as an end to the religious strife that had blighted England for so long; indeed, 17 November was long-celebrated thereafter as a public holiday. Mary was buried in Westminster Abbey. With no heirs, Mary Tudor was succeeded by her ha...

    • Mark Cartwright
    • Publishing Director
  4. Nov 20, 2015 · Mary Tudor was born on February 18, 1516, at the Palace of Placentia in Greenwich, England. She was the only child of King Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, to survive through...

  5. Oct 25, 2018 · She was the first-ever Queen of England to rule in her own right, but to her critics, Mary I of England has long been known only as “Bloody Mary.” This unfortunate nickname was thanks to her...

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