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  1. Mason Daring - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Mason_Daring

    Mason K. Daring (born September 21, 1949 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and composer of scores for film and television.He has worked on nearly all the films directed by John Sayles, adapting his style to fit whatever period in which the film is set.

  2. Category:Films scored by Mason Daring - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Films_scored_by

    Pages in category "Films scored by Mason Daring" The following 37 pages are in this category, out of 37 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ().

  3. Mason Daring - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

    wikimili.com › en › Mason_Daring

    Apr 23, 2019 · From Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Mason K. Daring (born September 21, 1949 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and composer of scores for film and television. He has worked on nearly all the films directed by John Sayles, adapting his style to fit whatever period in which the film is set. [1]

  4. The Secret of Roan Inish - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_Secret_of_Roan_Inish

    Mason Daring's spare, traditional Irish score adds one more layer of melancholy atmosphere," noted Scott Rosenberg of SFGate. Although in the original novel the story takes place in Scotland, the filmmakers decided to have the film take place in Ireland for practical reasons.

  5. The Brother from Another Planet - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › The_Brother_from_Another

    The Brother from Another Planet is a 1984 low-budget science fiction film, written and directed by John Sayles and starring Joe Morton

  6. Mason Daring : definition of Mason Daring and synonyms of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com › Mason Daring › en-en

    From Wikipedia. Mason K. Daring (born September 21, 1949 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American musician and composer of scores for film and television. He has worked on nearly all the films directed by John Sayles, adapting his style to fit whatever period in which the film is set.

  7. Matewan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Matewan

    Matewan is a 1987 American drama film written and directed by John Sayles, and starring Chris Cooper, James Earl Jones, Mary McDonnell and Will Oldham, with David Strathairn, Kevin Tighe and Gordon Clapp in supporting roles. The film dramatizes the events of the Battle of Matewan, a coal miners' strike in 1920 in Matewan, a small town in the hills of West Virginia. Matewan was a critical success but a box office flop, grossing under $2 million on an estimated $4 million budget. The film received

  8. Lianna - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Lianna

    Lianna is married to a college professor in film and media at a university in a midsized New Jersey town and has two children. In order to give her husband the greater freedom he wants and address her boredom, she takes a child psychology class with her friend, Sandy.

  9. WJIB - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › WJIB

    WJIB (740 AM) is a radio station based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and serving the Boston DMA.The playlist draws from 5,400 records, concentrating on adult standards from the 1930s through the 1960s, and softer pop music from the 1950s and 1960s.

  10. Biddy Mason | Encyclopedia.com

    www.encyclopedia.com › biddy-mason
    • Lived as A Slave
    • Gained Freedom
    • Nurse, Midwife, Property Owner
    • Community Impact and Legacy
    • Books
    • Periodicals
    • Online

    Bridget Mason, known to everyone as "Biddy," was born into slavery on August 15, 1818. Her place of birth was probably Hancock County, Georgia, though some historians cite it as Mississippi. She was of mixed African American and Native American descent, but the names of her parents are unknown. As a slave child, she was separated from her parents and sold several times, working on plantations in Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. She spent much of her childhood working on John Smithson's plantation in South Carolina, where she assisted the house servants and midwives. In 1836 Smithson gave the 18-year-old Mason, two other female house servants, and a blacksmith to his cousins, Robert Marion Smith and Rebecca (Crosby) Smith, as a wedding present. Mason was forbidden to learn to read or write, but she learned many practical skills, including medicine and midwifery. These skills made her a valuable asset to the Smiths on their plantation in Logtown, Mississippi. Mason took care...

    In 1849 California drafted a constitution forbidding slavery, and in September 1850 joined the Union as a free state. Slave owners who had arrived before 1850 could keep their slaves as indentured servants. Smith and his slaves arrived in 1851. Smith probably did not know that California was a free state when he made the trip. In San Bernardino, several free blacks told Mason how she could try to become free. They included Charles and Elizabeth Rowan, who had come with her from Utah, and Charles Owens and Manuel Pepper. Owens was courting Mason's 17-year-old daughter Ellen, and Pepper wanted to marry the daughter of Mason's friend, Hannah, another of Smith's slaves. By 1855 anti-slavery sentiment was growing stronger in California. Smith decided to move his family and his slaves to Texas, a state that allowed slavery. He planned to settle there or sell his slaves and make a profit. Smith's journey was delayed because Hannah was about to give birth to another of Smith's children. The...

    Robert Owens invited Mason and her family to live with him in Los Angeles. His son and her daughter soon married. Mason began to work as a midwife and nurse for Dr. John Strother Griffin. She quickly gained a reputation, becoming well known for her herbal remedies. Mason delivered babies for families of various races and social classes. She earned $2.50 a day, a good wage for an African American woman at that time. She also often gave her services to those unable to pay. After working as a midwife for ten years, Mason had saved $250. On November 28, 1866, Mason bought two lots bounded by Spring, Fort, Third, and Fourth Streets on the outskirts of the city. She was one of the first African American women to buy property in the United States. Mason initially used the land for gardening and built some small wooden houses to rent for additional income. She continued to rent accommodations for the next 18 years. Mason finally moved to her own land in 1884, when she was 66. She sold part...

    Mason devoted much of her time and energy to religious and community works. She opened her homestead to needy people, and lines of people seeking her assistance often formed on Spring Street. She also donated money and land to schools, day care centers, grocery stores, and churches, and she visited jail inmates regularly. Mason did much to help working African American families establish themselves in Los Angeles. In 1872, she and her son-in-law, Charles Owen, formed the Los Angeles branch of the First African Methodist Episcopal Church. According to Dolores Hayden's article in California History,Mason's great-granddaughter Gladys Owens Smith quoted Mason as saying, "If you hold your hand closed, nothing good can come in. The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance, even as it receives." Despite her prosperity, Mason was buried in an unmarked grave in Evergreen Cemetery in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. A tombstone was laid at the site nearly one hundred year...

    Beasley, Delilah L., The Negro Trail Blazers of California,G.K.Hall and Co., 1998. Hayden, Dolores, Urban Landscapes as Public History,MIT Press, 1995. Hine, Darlene Clark, ed., Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia,Carlson Publishing, 1993. Massey, Sara R., ed., Black Cowboys of Texas,Texas A & M University Press, 2000. Pinkney, Andrea Davis, Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters,Harcourt, 2000. Smith, Jessie Carney, ed., Notable Black American Women, Book 1,Gale Research, 1992.

    California History,Fall 1989. Cobblestone,February 1999. Denver Rocky Mountain News,February 8, 1996. Los Angeles Times,March 28, 1988; November 17, 1989; July 31, 1991. New York Times,December 7, 1989.

    "Angelinos of Ebony Hue," Black History Month, USC Libraries,http://www.usc.edu/isd/locations/ssh/doheny/ref/BHH/Exhibit/biddy_mason_1.html (October 27, 2001). "Bridget 'Biddy' Mason," Distinguished Women of Past and Present,http://www.distinguishedwomen.com/biographies/mason-b.html(October 27, 2001). □

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