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  1. Jun 19, 2023 · Max Morath, who stepped out of the 1890s only a lifetime late, and with syncopated piano rhythms and social commentary helped revive the ragtime age on television programs, in concert halls...

  2. To do all of this KRMA-TV, the Denver affiliate of NET, has drawn on the services of singer-pianist-musician Max Morath, who combines with his performances of ragtime classics a presentation of the pictures, stage sets, and other paraphernalia of The Ragtime Era.

  3. Jun 21, 2023 · Rocky Mountain PBS Station's Archived Memories News | Rocky Mountain PBS DENVER — Max Morath, the trailblazing pianist who revived ragtime and showed America that public television could be fun with his show “Ragtime Era,” passed away June 19 in Duluth, Minnesota. He was 96 years old.

    • Kyle Cooke
  4. Sep 29, 2021 · Max Morath is certainly accomplished a great deal in the field of educational documentary television and the back story to this landmark series is nearly as entertaining as the programs themselves. Max provided details of his early career for the article in the August 2021 issue of TST.

  5. Jun 23, 2023 · That is the way most people remember Max Morath or as Rudi Blesh dubbed him, “Mr. Ragtime.”. A title slide from The Ragtime Era. In 1959, his epic 12-episode TV series The Ragtime Era, was the first modern educational documentary at KRMA-TV in Denver that both entertained and informed.

  6. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Max_MorathMax Morath - Wikipedia

    Max Edward Morath (October 1, 1926 – June 19, 2023) was an American ragtime pianist, composer, actor, and author. He was best known for his piano playing and is referred to as " Mr. Ragtime ". [1] He was a touring performer as well as being variously a composer, recording artist, actor, playwright, and radio and television presenter. [2]

  7. Max Morath was a trailblazing pianist who revived ragtime and showed America that public television could be fun with his show “Ragtime Era.” In 1960, Morath, working with KRMA-TV in Denver (now Rocky Mountain PBS), wrote and produced “The Ragtime Era” for National Educational Television (NET), which was the predecessor of PBS.

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