Yahoo Web Search

  1. Ad
    related to: menexenus plato
  2. amazon.com has been visited by 1M+ users in the past month

  1. The Menexenus (/ məˈnɛksənəs /; Greek: Μενέξενος) is a Socratic dialogue of Plato, traditionally included in the seventh tetralogy along with the Greater and Lesser Hippias and the Ion. The speakers are Socrates and Menexenus, who is not to be confused with Socrates' son Menexenus.

    Menexenus (dialogue) - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menexenus_(dialogue)
  2. Menexenus (dialogue) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Menexenus_(dialogue)

    The Menexenus (/ məˈnɛksənəs /; Greek: Μενέξενος) is a Socratic dialogue of Plato, traditionally included in the seventh tetralogy along with the Greater and Lesser Hippias and the Ion. The speakers are Socrates and Menexenus, who is not to be confused with Socrates' son Menexenus.

  3. Menexenus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Menexenus

    Menexenus (/ m ə ˈ n ɛ k s ə n ə s /; Greek: Μενέξενоς) was one of the three sons of Socrates and Xanthippe.His two brothers were Lamprocles and Sophroniscus. Menexenus is not to be confused with the character of the same name who appears in Plato's dialogues Menexenus and Lysis.

  4. Menexenus - Plato | Armstrong Economics

    www.armstrongeconomics.com › books › menexenus-plato

    The Menexenus has more the character of a rhetorical exercise than any other of the Platonic works. The writer seems to have wished to emulate Thucydides, and the far slighter work of Lysias. In his rivalry with the latter, to whom in the Phaedrus Plato shows a strong antipathy, he is entirely successful, but he is not equal to Thucydides.

  5. People also ask

    What does Menexenus mean?

    What did Socrates say about Menexenus?

    Who were Plato's speakers?

  6. Menexenus | work by Plato | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › topic › Menexenus

    In Plato: Early dialogues The Menexenus purports to be a funeral oration that Socrates learned from Aspasia, the mistress of Pericles (himself celebrated for the funeral oration assigned to him by Thucydides, one of the most famous set pieces of Greek antiquity). This work may be a satire on the…

  7. Menexenus, by Plato - Project Gutenberg

    www.gutenberg.org › files › 1682

    Oct 23, 2008 · Whether the Menexenus is a genuine writing of Plato, or an imitation only, remains uncertain. In either case, the thoughts are partly borrowed from the Funeral Oration of Thucydides; and the fact that they are so, is not in favour of the genuineness of the work. Internal evidence seems to leave the question of authorship in doubt.

  8. The Menexenus: Plato’s Critique of Political Rhetoric

    www.press.umich.edu › pdf › 0472113275-ch2

    The Menexenus: Plato’s Critique of Political Rhetoric O ne of the characteristic features of Attic oratory is thefrequent appeal to the historical example as a means of winning over the audience to the speaker’s point of view. Because the chief motivation for its use is persuasion,1 the orators tend to render events according to popular tradi-

    • 183KB
    • 27
  9. Plato, Menexenus, section 234a - Perseus Project

    www.perseus.tufts.edu › hopper › text

    Plato. Plato in Twelve Volumes, Vol. 9 translated by W.R.M. Lamb. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1925. The Annenberg CPB/Project provided support for entering this text. Purchase a copy of this text (not necessarily the same edition) from Amazon.com

  10. PLATO, Menexenus | Loeb Classical Library

    www.loebclassics.com › view › plato-philosopher

    The difficulty of understanding Plato’s motive and purpose in the Menexenus lies in the apparent contrast between the bantering and satirical tone of the opening dialogue, in which Socrates disparages the orators and makes light of their art, and the patriotic and moral sentiments which are expressed with every appearance of good faith in the main body of the oration.

  11. Menexenus By Plato - freeclassicebooks.com

    freeclassicebooks.com › Plato › Menexenus

    MENEXENUS: Then why will you not rehearse what she said? SOCRATES: Because I am afraid that my mistress may be angry with me if I publish her speech. MENEXENUS: Nay, Socrates, let us have the speech, whether Aspasia's or any one else's, no matter. I hope that you will oblige me. SOCRATES: But I am afraid that you will laugh at me if I continue the

  12. People also search for
  1. Ads
    related to: menexenus plato