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      • The Merseburg Incantations (German: die Merseburger Zaubersprüche) are two medieval magic spells, charms or incantations, written in Old High German. They are the only known examples of Germanic heathen belief preserved in this language.
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  2. The Merseburg charms or Merseburg incantations ( German: die Merseburger Zaubersprüche) are two medieval magic spells, charms or incantations, written in Old High German. They are the only known examples of Germanic pagan belief preserved in the language. They were discovered in 1841 by Georg Waitz, who found them in a theological manuscript ...

  3. The Merseburg Incantations. They are the only pagan incantations preserved in Germany, written down by a monk more than 1,000 years ago and kept in the Merseburg cathedral chapter library: the Merseburg Incantations – two spells handed down in Old High German. The lines of text are magical incantations from pre-Christian times in a rare original form and are thus a record of Germanic pagan customs.

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    • Incantation 1: Liberation of Prisoners
    • Incantation 2: Horse Cure
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    The Merseburg Incantations (German: die Merseburger Zaubersprüche) are two medieval magic spells, charms or incantations, written in Old High German. They are the only known examples of Germanic pagan belief preserved in this language. They were discovered in 1841 by Georg Waitz, who found them in a theological manuscript from Fulda, written in the...

    Each charm is divided into two parts: a preamble telling the story of a mythological event; and the actual spell in the form of a magic analogy (just as it was before... so shall it also be now...). In their verse form, the spells are of a transitional type; the lines show not only alliteration but also the end-rhymes developed in the Christian ver...

    Among the preliterate early Germanic tribes, incantations had the function "of rendering usable, through captive words, the magic powers which people wished to make serve them" They have survived in large numbers, particularly from the area of the Germanic languages. However, they all date from the Middle Ages and therefore bear the stamp or show t...

    The first spell is a "Lösesegen" (blessing of release), describing a number of " Idisen" (Valkyrie women, ) being told to free from their shackles the warriors caught during battle. The last two lines contain the magic words "Leap forth from the fetters, escape from the foes" that are intended to release the warriors.

    Phol (possibly another name for Balder) is with Wodan (Odin) when Balder's horse dislocates its foot while riding through the forest (holza). Odin is saying as a result: "Bone to bone, blood to blood, limb to limb, as if they were glued". Images from the 5th-6th century show Odin healing a horse. Unfortunately, the other gods' names cannot be ident...

    Many German rock groups and musicians have been inspired by the Merseburg Incantations and produced their own settings. The already "classic" adaptation of the first incantation comes from the group Ougenweide; it is a free invention based on no real musical tradition. The group In Extremo, whose song Küss mich (Kiss me) was in the 2003 charts, inc...

    The manuscript of the Merseburg Incantations was on display until November 2004 as part of the exhibition "Between Cathedral and World - 1000 years of the Chapter of Merseburg", at Merseburg cathedral. They were previously exhibited in 1939. The incantations can be found "freely translated" into English by D. L. Ashliman at his website.

  4. Merseburg Incantations manuscript (Merseburger Domstiftsbibliothek, Codex 136, f. 85r, 10th Cy.) The Merseburg Incantationsor Merseburg Charms(German: die Merseburger Zaubersprüche) are two medievalmagic spells, charms or incantations, written in Old High German. They are the only known examples of Germanic pagan beliefpreserved in this language. They were discovered in 1841 by Georg Waitz,[1]who found them in a theological manuscript from Fulda, written in the 9th or 10th century,[2 ...

  5. Merseburg Incantations Wayland Revisited: A Pan-European God? December 8, 2015 / 1 Comment The enigmatic fairy-smith ‘ Wayland ‘ is famed in the legends of the pagan north Europeans, particularly among the speakers of the Scandinavian and Germanic language groups.