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  1. Mihnea cel Rău | Istoria României community | Fandom

    istoriaromaniei.fandom.com › ro › wiki

    Mihnea cel Rău a fost fiul lui Vlad Țepeș cu prima șoție și domnitor al Valahiei din 1508 până în 1509 , ucând la tron după moarea vărului său prim Radu cel Mare . În timpul domniei sale l-a asociat la domnie pe fiul său Mircea al III-lea în 1509 . Nepopular printre boieri , a fost răsturnat cu sprijin otoman , refugindu-se în Transilvania unde urma să fie ucis în fața ...

  2. Mihnea cel Rău - Wikiwand

    www.wikiwand.com › ro › Mihnea_cel_Rău

    Mihnea cel Rău a fost un domn al Țării Românești între 1508 și 1509, fiu al lui Vlad Țepeș. S-a aflat în conflict permanent cu boierii și a fost expulzat de pe tron cu ajutorul sultanului. S-a refugiat în Transilvania, unde a fost ucis un an mai târziu pe treptele Bisericii Catolice din Sibiu.[2]

  3. Talk:Mihnea cel Rău - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Mihnea_cel_Rău

    Make use in articles of the newly contributed images (about 5800!!) from the Wiki Loves Monuments Romania 2011 (WLM Romania external site) Review newly created Romania-related articles Check the articles needing expert attention or other work , and help with some of the items

  4. Mihnea cel Rău - Wikipedia | Cel, Historical figures, Historical

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    Mar 9, 2014 - Mihnea cel Rau ( Mihnea the bad) king of Wallachia

  5. Vlad III 'Ţepeș' Drăculea, Domnitor al Țării Românești (1431 ...

    www.geni.com › people › Vlad-the-Impaler-Dracula

    Mar 26, 2021 · Vlad III, Prince of Wallachia, more commonly known as the Impaler or Dracula, was a three-time voivode of Wallachia, ruling mainly from 1456 to 1462. Historically, Vlad is best known for his resistance against the Ottoman Empire and its expansion and for the cruel punishments he imposed on his enemies. In the English-speaking world, Vlad III is ...

    • Mihnea cel Rău, Mihail, Radu, Zaleska
    • Vlad II Dracul
  6. Vlad III the Impaler | Royal Family Wiki | Fandom

    royalfamily.fandom.com › wiki › Vlad_III_the_Impaler
    • Names
    • Wallachian Royalty and Family Background
    • Legacy
    • Alleged Atrocities
    • Anecdotal Evidence
    • The Vampire Legend and Romanian Attitudes
    • External Links

    His Romanian surname Drăculea (transliterated as "Dracula" in foreign languages of the historical documents where his name is mentioned) is a diminutive derived from his father's title Dracul and means "Son of the Dragon" (see Vlad II Dracul); the latter was a member of the Order of the Dragon created by Emperor Sigismund. Vlad's family had two factions, the Drăculeşti and the Dăneşti. The word "dracul" means "the Devil" in modern Romanian but in Vlad's day also meant "dragon" or "demon". His post-mortem moniker of Ţepeş (Impaler) originated in his preferred method for executing his opponents, impalement - as popularized by medieval Transylvanian pamphlets. In Turkish, he was known as "Kazıklı Bey" IPA: [[[:Template:IPA]]] which means "Impaler Prince". Vlad was referred to as Dracula in a number of documents of his times, mainly the Transylvanian Saxon pamphlets and The Annals of Jan Długosz. Outside Wallachia he was known by the exaggerated tales of "atrocities" (many of which stem...

    The crown of Wallachia was not passed automatically from father to son; instead, the leader was elected by the boyars, with the requirement that the Prince-elect be of nominally Basarab princely lineage (os de domn- "of voivode bones", "of voivode marrow"), including out of wedlock births. This elective monarchy often resulted in instability, family disputes and assassinations. Eventually, the princely house split between two factions: the descendants of Mircea the Elder, Vlad's grandfather; and those of another prince, Dan II (Dăneşti faction). In addition to that, as in all feudal states, there was another struggle between the central administration (the prince) and the high nobility for control over the country. To top it off, the two powerful neighbors of Wallachia, the Kingdom of Hungary and the Ottoman Empire, were at the peak of their rivalry for control of southeastern Europe, turning Wallachia into a battle ground. His father, Vlad II Dracul, born around 1395, was an illegi...

    Romanian oral tradition provides another important source for the life of Vlad the Impaler: legends and tales concerning the Impaler have remained a part of folklore among the Romanian peasantry. These tales have been passed down from generation to generation for five hundred years. Through constant retelling they have become somewhat garbled and confused and they have gradually been forgotten in later years. However, they still provide valuable information about Dracula and his relationship with his people. Many of the tales contained in the pamphlets are also found in the oral tradition, though with a somewhat different emphasis. Among the Romanian peasantry, Vlad Ţepeş was remembered as a just prince who defended his people from foreign aggression, whether those foreigners were Turkish invaders or German merchants. He is also remembered as a champion of the common man against the oppression of the boyars. National poet of Romania, Mihai Eminescu wrote the memorable verses "Unde e...

    Template:POV-sectionTemplate:Unreferenced Vlad III Ţepeş has been characterized, by some, as exceedingly cruel. Impalement was Ţepeş's preferred method of torture and execution. His method of torture was a horse attached to each of the victim's legs as a sharpened stake was gradually forced into the body. The end of the stake was usually oiled, and care was taken that the stake not be too sharp; else the victim might die too rapidly from shock. Normally the stake was inserted into the body through the anusand was often forced through the body until it emerged from the mouth. However, there were many instances where victims were impaled through other bodily orifices or through the abdomen or chest. Infants were sometimes impaled on the stake forced through their mother's chests. The records indicate that victims were sometimes impaled so that they hung upside down on the stake. As expected, death by impalement was slow and painful. Victims sometimes endured for hours or days. Vlad of...

    Much of the information we have about Vlad III Ţepeş comes from pamphlets published in the Holy Roman Empire and chronicles written in Muscovy. The first known German pamphlet dates from 1488 and it is possible that some were printed during Vlad’s lifetime. At least initially, they may have been politically inspired. At that time Matthias Corvinus of Hungary was seeking to bolster his own reputation in the Empire and may have intended the early pamphlets as justification of his less than vigorous support of his vassal. The pamphlets were also a form of mass entertainment in a society where the printing press was just coming into widespread use. Much like the subject matter of the supermarket tabloids of today, the cruel life of the Wallachian tyrant was easily sensationalized. The pamphlets were reprinted numerous times over the thirty or so years following Vlad's death -- strong proof of their popularity. The German pamphlets painted Vlad Ţepeş as an inhuman monster who terrorized...

    It is unclear why Bram Stoker chose this Wallachian prince as the model for his fictional vampire. [citation needed] Stoker was a friend of a Hungarian professor (Arminius Vambery/Hermann Vamberger) from Budapest, and many have suggested that Vlad's name might have been mentioned by this friend. Regardless of how the name came to Stoker's attention, the cruel history of the Impaler would have readily loaned itself to Stoker's purposes. The events of Vlad's life were played out in a region of the world that was still basically medieval even in Stoker's time. The Balkans had only recently shaken off the Turkish yoke when Stoker started working on his novel and ancient superstitions were still prevalent. Transylvania had long been a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but it had also been an Ottoman vassal (although it never fell under Turkish domination, and was in fact semi-independent and at times under Habsburginfluence). Recent research suggests that Stoker knew little of the Pri...

    Template:Commons 1. Vlad Tepes - Dracula Between Hero and Vampire 2. Vlad III Dracula 3. Vlad's History 4. Vlad's Biography 5. Vlad III Dracula 6. The Tale of DraculaRussian manuscript circa 1490, with English translation (MS Word format) 7. The Real Life of Dracula 8. The Politics of Count Dracula 9. Dark Prince: The True Story of Dracula (2000) (TV) 10. Coins attributed to Vlad III Tepes Template:Start boxTemplate:Succession boxTemplate:Succession boxTemplate:Succession box|}

  7. Dracula | The Demonic Paradise Wiki | Fandom

    the-demonic-paradise.fandom.com › wiki › Dracula

    Dracula, formerly known as Vlad III Tepes, also known as Vladislav III, Vlad Dracula or Vlad the Impaler, and currently known as Alucard, is a noble born in Wallachia of Transylvania at 1431. His father was called "Dracul," meaning "dragon" or "devil" in Romanian because he belonged to the Order of the Dragon, which fought the Muslim Ottoman Empire. In the 21st century, he currently works as ...

  8. Wallachia | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Wallachia
    • Etymology
    • History
    • Slavery
    • Geography
    • Population
    • See Also
    • References
    • External Links

    The name Wallachia, generally not used by Romanians themselves (but present in some contexts as Valahia or Vlahia), is derived from the word "walha" used by Germanic peoples to describe Celts, and later romanized Celts and all Romance-speaking people. In northwest Europe this gave rise to Wales, Cornwall, Wallonia, among others, while in Southeast Europe it evolved into the ethnonym Valach, used to designate Germanic speakers' Romance-speaking neighbours, and subsequently taken over by Slavic-speakers to refer to Romanians, with variants such as Vlach, Blach, Bloc, Bloh, Boloh etc.—see also: Vlachs. In the early Middle Ages, in Slavonic texts, the name of Zemli Ungro-Vlahiskoi (Земли Унгро-Влахискои or "Hungaro-Wallachian Land") was also used as a designation for its location. The term, translated in Romanian as "Ungrovalahia", remained in use up to the modern era in a religious context, referring to the Romanian Orthodox Metropolitan seat of Hungaro-Wallachia, in contrast to Thessa...

    Ancient times

    In the Second Dacian War (105 AD) western Oltenia became part of the Roman province of Dacia, with parts of Wallachia included in the Moesia Inferior province. The Roman limes was initially built along the Olt River (119), before being moved slightly to the east in the 2nd century—during which time it stretched from the Danube up to Rucărin the Carpathians. The Roman line fell back to the Olt in 245 and, in 271, the Romans pulled out of the region. The area was subject to Romanization also du...

    Early Middle Ages

    Byzantine influence is evident during the 5th to 6th century, such as the site at Ipoteşti-Cândeşti, but from the second half of the 6th century and in the 7th century Slavic peoples crossed the territory of Wallachia and settled in it, on their way to Byzantium, occupying the southern bank of the Danube. In 593, the Byzantine commander-in-chief Priscus defeated Slavs, Avars and Gepids on future Wallachian territory, and, in 602, Slavs suffered a crucial defeat in the area; Flavius Mauricius...

    Creation

    One of the first written pieces of evidence of local voivodes is in connection with Litovoi (1272), who ruled over land each side of the Carpathians (including Hațeg Country in Transylvania), and refused to pay tribute to the Hungarian King Ladislaus IV. His successor was his brother Bărbat (1285–1288). The continuing weakening of the Hungarian state by further Mongol invasions (1285–1319) and the fall of the Árpád dynastyopened the way for the unification of Wallachian polities, and to indep...

    Slavery (Romanian language: robie) was part of the social order from before the founding of the Principality of Wallachia, until it was abolished in stages during the 1840s and 1850s. Most of the slaves were of Roma (Gypsy) ethnicity. The very first document attesting the presence of Roma people in Wallachia dates back to 1385, and refers to the group as aţigani (from, athiganoi a Greek-language word for "heretics", and the origin of the Romanian term ţigani, which is synonymous with "Gypsy"). The exact origins of slavery are not known. Slavery was a common practice in Europe at the time, and there is some debate over whether the Romani people came to Wallachia as free men or as slaves. In the Byzantine Empire, they were slaves of the state and it seems the situation was the same in Bulgaria and Serbia until their social organization was destroyed by the Ottoman conquest, which would suggest that they came as slaves who had a change of 'ownership'. Historian Nicolae Iorga associated...

    With an area of approximately 77,000 km2 (30,000 sq mi), Wallachia is situated north of the Danube (and of present-day Bulgaria), east of Serbia and south of the Southern Carpathians, and is traditionally divided between Muntenia in the east (as the political center, Muntenia is often understood as being synonymous with Wallachia), and Oltenia(a former banat) in the west. The division line between the two is the Olt River. Wallachia's traditional border with Moldavia coincided with the Milcov River for most of its length. To the east, over the Danube north-south bend, Wallachia neighbours Dobruja (Northern Dobruja). Over the Carpathians, Wallachia shared a border with Transylvania; Wallachian princes have for long held possession of areas north of the line (Amlaş, Ciceu, Făgăraş, and Haţeg), which are generally not considered part of Wallachia-proper. The capital city changed over time, from Câmpulung to Curtea de Argeş, then to Târgovişteand, after the late 17th century, to Bucharest.

    Historical population

    Contemporary historians estimate the populatian of Wallachia in the 15th century, at 500,000 people. In 1859, the population of Wallachia was 2,400,921 (1,586,596 in Muntenia and 814,325 in Oltenia).

    Current population

    According to the latest 2002 census data, the region has a total population of approximately 8,750,000 inhabitants, distributed among the ethnic groups as follows: Romanians (97%), Roma(2.5%), others (0.5%).

    Cities

    The largest cities (as per the 2011 census) in the Wallachia region are: 1. Bucharest (1,677,985) 2. Craiova(243,765) 3. Ploieşti (197,522) 4. Brăila(168,389) 5. Piteşti(148,264) 6. Buzău(108,384) 7. Râmnicu Vâlcea(92,573) 8. Drobeta-Turnu Severin(86,475)

    History of Bucharest
    List of rulers of Wallachia
    Vlachs
    Berza, Mihai. "Haraciul Moldovei şi al Ţării Româneşti în sec. XV–XIX", in Studii şi Materiale de Istorie Medie, II, 1957, p. 7–47
    Djuvara, Neagu. Între Orient şi Occident. Ţările române la începutul epocii moderne, Humanitas, Bucharest, 1995
    Giurescu, Constantin. Istoria Bucureştilor. Din cele mai vechi timpuri pînă în zilele noastre, Ed. Pentru Literatură, Bucharest, 1966
    Ştefănescu, Ştefan. Istoria medie a României, Vol. I, Bucharest, 1991
  9. Vlad III | Gods and Demons Wiki | Fandom

    gods-and-demons.fandom.com › wiki › Vlad_III
    • Overview
    • Appearance
    • Personality
    • History
    • Myths and Legends
    • Trivia

    His father was called "Dracul," meaning "dragon" or "devil" in Romanian because he belonged to the Order of the Dragon, which fought the Muslim Ottoman Empire. "Dracula" means "Son of Dracul" in Romanian. Therefore young Vlad was "son of the dragon" or Son of the Devil. Scholars believe this was the beginning of the legend that Dracula was a Vampire.

    Vlad is dressed in a royal fashion, appearing as black as a shadow in the night, contrasted with his pale face and long, silk-like white hair. He gives off an overwhelming presence, causing ceaseless trembling wherever he happens to look. This does not stem from fear due to a violent nature, but rather that those exposed to his icy gaze recognize themselves as hopelessly weak and powerless existences before him.

    Though there is an aura of danger about him, he in fact possesses a modest and considerate personality. His opinions and unrestrained manner of expression lend easily to the impression that he is a sociopath who has disengaged himself from the standard mores of society. Platinum Collection Build Your Own Bundle. Choose up to 7 games Fandom may earn an affiliate commission on sales made from links on this page. He is angered by the legend of "Count Dracula" that has stained his name, so he wishes to restore his name's honor. Although he will not deny the path he walked in life, even those to which he has resigned himself like the war against the Turks and his imprisonment, he cannot forgive his name being smeared with blood, telling of a humiliating legend of a blood-starved fiend, in matters that did not involve him in any way. He tries to ignore the reputation of the vampire modeled after him in a mature manner, but somehow, representations of him that he comes across will end up b...

    Vlad lived in a time of constant war. Transylvania was at the frontier of two great empires: the Ottoman Turks and the Austrian Hapsburgs. Treachery, vindictiveness, and revenge ruled the day, as young Vlad soon discovered. Vlad was imprisoned, first by the Turks, who hauled him away in chains, and later by the Hungarians. Vlad's father was murdered, while his older brother, Mircea, was blinded with red-hot iron stakes and buried alive. From 1448 until his death in 1476, Vlad ruled Wallachia and Transylvania, both part of Romania today. Twice he lost and reclaimed his throne, once by fighting his own brother, Radu. Although the Vaticanonce praised him for defending Christianity, it disapproved of his methods, which soon became infamous. Vlad's favorite method of torture was to impale people and leave them to writhe in agony, often for days. As a warning to others, the bodies would remain on rods as vultures and blackbirds nibbled the rotting flesh. Dracula was also known for slaught...

    This word became Anglicized to "Dracula" and Bram Stoker used this form as the eponymous title for his 1897 Gothic novel and its main antagonist, Count Dracula. Although both the real Vlad and the fictional Dracula originated in Romania, it is to be noted that their specific ethnicities and default languages differed: Vlad the Impaler was ethnically Vlach and spoke Romanian during his time, while Dracula was depicted as being Szekely, a Hungarian-speaking ethnic group still in existence in the current day.

    The name Dracula has been used constantly for leaders of vampires or powerful figures in Vampire history.
    Vlad loathes the novel "Dracula" by Bram Stoker, which he considered had ruined his reputation even though it wasn't meant for him.
    The human Ottomar Rodolphe Vlad Dracula Prince Kretzulescois a flamboyant German socialite who achieved fame through a claim of adopted lineage from Vlad III.
    There is a rumor in the Shadowhunter community that he and his acolytes impaled prisoners of war to summon the demon-witch goddess Hecate, who was pleased by the sacrifice and turned them into the...
  10. Vlad III the Impaler | PAL-TIN Wiki | Fandom

    paltin.fandom.com › wiki › Vlad_III_the_Impaler
    • Names
    • Wallachian Royalty and Family Background
    • Legacy
    • Atrocities
    • The German Stories About Vlad Ţepeş
    • The Russian Stories About Vlad Ţepeş
    • The Vampire Legend and Romanian Attitudes
    • Vlad in Popular Culture and in The Media
    • External Links

    His Romanian surname Drǎculea, is derived from his father's title Dracul, meaning affiliation to and/or descent from "Dracul" (see Vlad II Dracul); the latter was a member of the Order of the Dragon created by Emperor Sigismund. Vlad's family had two factions, the Drăculeşti and the Dăneşti. The word "dracul" means "the Devil" or "demon" in modern Romanian but in Vlad's day also meant "dragon", and derives from the Latin word Draco, also meaning "dragon". His post-mortem moniker of Ţepeş (Impaler) originated in his preferred method for executing his opponents, impalement — as popularized by medieval Transylvanian pamphlets. In Turkish, he was known as "Kazıklı Bey" (pronounced [kɑzɯkˈɫɯ]) which means "Impaler Prince". Vlad was referred to as Dracula in a number of documents of his times, mainly the Transylvanian Saxon pamphlets and The Annals of Jan Długosz. .

    The crown of Wallachia was not passed automatically from father to son; instead, the leader was elected by the boyars, with the requirement that the Prince-elect be of nominally Basarab princely lineage (os de domn — "of voivode bones", "of voivode marrow"), including out of wedlock births. This elective monarchy often resulted in instability, family disputes and assassinations. Eventually, the princely house split between two factions: the descendants of Mircea the Elder, Vlad's grandfather; and those of another prince, Dan II (Dăneşti faction). In addition to that, as in all feudal states, there was another struggle between the central administration (the prince) and the high nobility for control over the country. To top it off, the two powerful neighbors of Wallachia, the Kingdom of Hungary and the Ottoman Empire, were at the peak of their rivalry for control of southeastern Europe, turning Wallachia into a battle ground. His father, Vlad II Dracul, born around 1395, was an illeg...

    The legacy and the legend of Vlad Ţepeş is mostly the result of different stories about him. The Romanian, German, and the Russian stories all have their origins in the 15th century. Besides the written stories the Romanian oral tradition provides another important source for the life of Vlad the Impaler: legends and tales concerning the Impaler have remained a part of folklore among the Romanian peasantry. These tales have been passed down from generation to generation for five hundred years. Through constant retelling they have become somewhat garbled and confused and they have gradually been forgotten in later years. However, they still provide valuable information about Dracula and his relationship with his people. Many of the tales contained in the pamphlets are also found in the oral tradition, though with a somewhat different emphasis. Among the Romanian peasantry, Vlad Ţepeş was remembered as a just prince who defended his people from foreign aggression, whether those foreig...

    The reputation of Vlad Ţepeş was considerably darker in the Western Europe than in the Eastern Europe and Romania. In the West, Vlad III Ţepeş had been characterized as an exceedingly cruel madman. The number of his victims ranges from 40 000 to 100 000. Much of the information about his atrocities and cruelness comes from the German stories written about him, which were for the most part politically, religiously and economically inspired propaganda against Vlad Ţepeş. Although some of the stories have some base in reality, most of them are either fictional or exaggerated. According to the German stories the number of victims he had killed was at least 80 000. In addition to the 80 000 victims mentioned he also had whole villages and fortresses destroyed and burned to the ground. These numbers are most likely exaggerated. For example in one episode in the German stories Vlad impaled 600 merchants from Braşov and confiscated all their goods. A document written by Vlad’s rival Dan III...

    The German stories circulated first in manuscript form in the late 15th century and the first manuscript was probably written in 1462 before Vlad’s arrest. The text was later printed in Germany and had major impact on the general public becoming a best-seller of its time with numerous later editions adding and alternating the original text. In addition to the manuscripts and pamphlets the German version of the stories can be found in the poem of Michel Beheim. The poem called Von ainem wutrich der heis Trakle waida von der Walachei (“Story of a Bloodthirsty Madman Called Dracula of Wallachia”) was written and performed at the court of Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperorduring the winter of 1463. To this day four manuscripts and 13 pamphlets are found as well as the poem by Michel Beheim. The surviving manuscripts date from the last quarter of the 15th century to the year 1500 and the found pamphlets date from 1488 to 1559-1568. Eight of the pamphlets are actually incunabulum because t...

    The Russian or the Slavic version of the stories about Vlad Ţepeş called Skazanie o Drakule voevode (Tale about Voivode Dracula) is thought to have been written sometime between 1481 and 1486. Copies of the story were made from the 15th century to the 18th century. There are some twenty-two extant manuscripts about Vlad in Russian archives. The oldest one is from the year 1490 and it ends as following: First written in the year 6994 (meaning 1486), on 13 February; then transcribed by me, the sinner Elfrosin, in the year 6998 (meaning 1490), on 28 January. The Tale about Voivode Dracula is neither chronological nor consistent, but mostly a collection of anecdotes of literary and historical value concerning Vlad Ţepeş. There are 19 episodes or anecdotes in the Tale about Voivode Dracula and they are longer and more constructed than the German stories. The Tale itself can be divided into two sections. The first 13 episodes are more or less non chronological events and are most likely c...

    It is most likely that Bram Stoker found the name for his vampire from William Wilkinsons book called An Account of the Principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia: with various Political Observations Relating to Them. It is known that Stoker made notes about this book. It is also suggested by some that because Stoker was a friend of a Hungarian professor (Arminius Vambery/Hermann Vamberger) from Budapest, Vlad's name might have been mentioned by this friend. Regardless of how the name came to Stoker's attention, the cruel history of the Impaler would have readily lent itself to Stoker's purposes. The events of Vlad's life were played out in a region of the world that was still basically medieval even in Stoker's time. The Balkans had only recently shaken off the Turkish yoke when Stoker started working on his novel and ancient superstitions were still prevalent. Transylvania had long been a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, but it had also been an Ottoman vassal (although it never...

    Apart from the Dracula movies, which are partially based on Vlad as well as Elizabeth Bathory, there has been comparatively fewer movies about the man who inspired the vampire. In 1979, Romania released a movie based on his six-year reign and his brief return to power in late 1476 called Vlad Ţepeş (sometimes known, in other countries, as The True Story of Vlad the Impaler), in which the character is portrayed with a mostly positive perspective, while, at the same time, also mentioning the excesses of his regime and his practice of impalement. The lead character is played by Ştefan Sileanu. In literature, he is found as a main character of the book the Historian, published in 2005.

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