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  1. Mikhail III of Tver - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Mikhail_III_of_Tver

    Mikhail III of Tver. Mikhail III of Tver or Michael the Exile (1453–1505) was the last prince of Tver, the son of Boris of Tver and Anastasia of Suzdal (d. after 1486). He was Grand Prince of Tver from February 10, 1461 to 1485. He married Sophia Olelkovich, princess of Slutsk of Lithuanian origin in 1471 (d.

  2. Mikhail of Tver - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Mikhail_of_Tver

    Mikhail Yaroslavich ( Russian: Михаил Ярославич) (1271 – 22 November 1318), also known as Michael of Tver, was a Prince of Tver (from 1285) who ruled as Grand Prince of Vladimir from 1304 until 1314 and again from 1315–1318. He was canonized and counted among the saints of the Russian Orthodox Church .

  3. Mikhail of Tver - Russian Rulers History

    russianrulershistory.com › mikhail-of-tver

    Nov 22, 2012 · Mikhail of Tver. Prince Mikhail of Tver, the second son of Grand Prince Yaroslav III of Kiev was born on November 22, 1318. Mikhail Yaroslavich was the Prince of both Tver and had two rules over the principality of Vladimir (1304-14 and 1315-18). He was made a saint of the Russian Orthodox Church.

  4. Mikhail of Tver | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Mikhail_of_Tver
    • Troubles as Grand Prince and Rivalry with Moscow
    • Mikhail and The Church
    • Family and Children
    • External Links

    While he seemed secure in the throne, being the legitimate heir and having been confirmed by the Khan in Sarai, Grand Prince Mikhail suffered a series of setbacks as grand prince which led to him losing the grand princely office for both himself and, in some ways, ultimately for his descendants. He was, like most Grand Princes of Vladimir, accepted as Prince of Novgorod the Great in 1309, but fought with Novgorod, going so far as to withdraw his lieutenants (namestniki) and cut off grain shipments into the city in 1312. While he was on decent terms with Tokhta Khan, and initially with his successor, Uzbeg Khan (Mikhail paid homage on Uzbeg's accession to the throne in 1313 and remained in Sarai until 1315), he eventually lost influence to Yury of Moscow, who gained influence in Novgorod while the grand prince was away in Sarai. Mikhail did manage to finally take control of the city in 1316 with Mongol aid, but the following year Uzbeg Khan gave the yarlik or patent of office of the...

    Mikhail also alienated the Church, particularly Metropolitan Petr (r. 1308-1326). When Metropolitan Maksim died in 1305, Mikhail nominated another candidate, but Petr was consecrated by the Patriarch of Constantinople. Petr sided with Moscow and opposed Mikhail on several occasions. In 1309, he appointed David as Archbishop of Novgorod and David was instrumental in the argument that led Mikhail to withdraw his lieutenants and cut the grain supplies to the city. In 1314, Novgorod called on Yury to be named grand prince and for Mikhail to be deposed. Thus the support of the Church aided Yury to Mikhail's detriment.Despite his having been unfavored by the Russian Orthodox Church during his lifetime, the Church later declared Mikhail a saint.

    In 294 Mikhail married Princess Anna of Rostov, daughter of Prince Dimitry of Rostov. They had five children: 1. Prince Dmitry of Tver(1299–1326) 2. Prince Alexander of Tver(1301–1339) 3. Prince Konstantin of Tver(1306–1346) 4. Prince Vasily of Kashin(d. after 1368) 5. Feodora of Tver Mikhail's sons and successors Dmitry the Terrible Eyes and Alexander were both also loved in the Horde, as was Alexander's elder son, Mikhail. Both Aleksandr Mikhailovich, and Mikhail Aleksandrovich briefly held the Grand Princely office (in 1326-1327 and 1371-1372 respectively) but Mikhail's failure to defeat Yury of Moscow, followed by Aleksandr's role (real or perceived) in the Tver Uprising of 1327, led the Tver branch to lose the favor of the Khans, and the Danilovich - the Muscovite princes, held the title for all but two years after 1317. Mikhail's wife took the veil in Kashin's nunnery and died there on October 2, 1368. She is commemorated as Anna of Kashinby the Russian Orthodox Church and was...

    (Russian) Biography
    (Russian) Canonical biography
  5. Mikhail Yaroslavich of Tver (1271-1318) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org › wiki › Mikhail_Yaroslavich
    • Troubles as Grand Prince and Rivalry with Moscow
    • Mikhail and The Church
    • Family and Children
    • External Links
    • Siblings

    While he seemed secure in the throne, being the legitimate heir and having been confirmed by the Khan in Sarai, Grand Prince Mikhail suffered a series of setbacks as grand prince which led to him losing the grand princely office for both himself and, in some ways, ultimately for his descendants. He was, like most Grand Princes of Vladimir-Suzdal, accepted as Prince of Novgorod in 1309,but fought with Novgorod, going so far as to withdraw his lieutenants (namestniki) and cut off grain shipments into the city in 1312. While he was on decent terms with Tokhta Khan, and initially with his successor, Uzbeg Khan (Mikhail paid homage on Uzbeg's accession to the throne in 1313 and remained in Sarai until 1315), he eventually lost influence to Yuri of Moscow, who gained influence in Novgorod while the grand prince was away in Sarai. Mikhail did manage to finally take control of the city in 1316 with Mongol aid, but the following year Uzbeg Khan gave the Jarlig or patent of office of the Gran...

    Mikhail also alienated the Church, particularly Metropolitan Petr (ruled 1308–1326). When Metropolitan Maksim died in 1305, Mikhail nominated another candidate, but Petr was consecrated by the Patriarch of Constantinople. Petr sided with Moscow and opposed Mikhail on several occasions. In 1309, he appointed David as Archbishop of Novgorod and David was instrumental in the argument that led Mikhail to withdraw his lieutenants and cut the grain supplies to the city. In 1314, Novgorod called on Yuri to be named grand prince and for Mikhail to be deposed. Thus the support of the Church aided Yuri to Mikhail's detriment. Despite his having been unfavored by the Russian Orthodox Church during his lifetime, the Church later declared Mikhail a saint because of his piousness during his summons by the Khan which he knew was to certain death and because his relics, when transported to his hometown, were discovered to be incorrupt.

    In 1294 Mikhail married Princess Anna of Rostov, daughter of Dimitri Borisovich. They had five children: 1. Fyodora Mikhailovna of Tver (c1296-c1297) 2. Dmitri Mikhailovich of Tver (1299-1326) 3. Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver (1301-1339) 4. Konstantin Mikhailovich of Tver (1302-1345) 5. Vasili Mikhailovich of Tver (c1304-1368) Mikhail's sons and successors Dmitri and Aleksandr were both also liked in the Horde, as was Aleksandr's elder son, Mikhail. Both Aleksandr Mikhailovich, and Mikhail Aleksandrovich briefly held the Grand Princely office (in 1326-1327 and 1371-1372 respectively) but Mikhail's failure to defeat Yury of Moscow, followed by Aleksandr's role (real or perceived) in the Tver Uprising of 1327, led the Tver branch to lose the favor of the Khans, and the Danilovich - the Muscovite princes, held the title for all but two years after 1317. Mikhail's wife took the veil in Kashin's nunnery and died there on 2 October 1368. She is commemorated as Anna of Kashin by the Russi...

    (Russian) Biography
    (Russian) Canonical biography

    Common ancestors of Mikhail Yaroslavich of Tver (1271-1318) and Anna Dmitriyevna of Kashin (c1280-1368) 1. Mariya Shvarnovna of Ossetia (1155-1205) 2. Vsevolod III Yuryevich of Vladimir (1154-1212)

    • 1271
    • Anna Dmitriyevna of Kashin (c1280-1368)
    • Kseniya Yuryevna of Tarusa (c1246-1312)
    • Prince of Tver Grand Prince of Vladimir
  6. Prince of Tver Mikhail Yaroslavich, Rurikid (1272 - 1318 ...

    www.geni.com › people › Prince-of-Tver-Mikhail

    Jan 22, 2019 · Mikhail Yaroslavich (Russian: Михаил Ярославич) (1271 – November 22, 1318), also known as Michael of Tver or Michael the Saint, was a Prince of Tver (from 1285) who ruled as Grand Prince of Vladimir from 1304 until 1314 and again from 1315-1318. He is counted among the saints of the Russian Orthodox Church.

  7. ExecutedToday.com » 1318: Mikhail of Tver

    www.executedtoday.com › 2011/11/22 › 1318-mikhail-of-tver

    Nov 22, 2011 · 1318: Mikhail of Tver. November 22nd, 2011 Headsman. On this date in 1318, the Russian knyaz Mikhail of Tver was executed at the command of the Mongols. Mikhail was the nephew of legendary prince and allegory Alexander Nevsky. Not directly Mikhail-related.

  8. Grand Prince of Tver Mikhail (1333 - 1399) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com › people › Grand-Prince-of-Tver-Mikhail

    Jan 22, 2019 · Mikhail Alexandrovich was Grand Prince of Tver and briefly held the title of Grand Prince of Vladimir. He was one of only two Tver princes after 1317 (the other was his father, Aleksandr) to hold the grand princely title, which was almost the exclusive purview of the Muscovite princes. Mikhail Alexandrovich was the fourth son of Aleksandr ...

  9. Mikhail Yaroslavich - zxc.wiki

    de.zxc.wiki › wiki › Michail_Jaroslawitsch

    Under a pretext that the inhabitants of Tver were drawn to the enemies of the Tatars, the Lithuanians, Yury set his troops on the march against Tver, after he had also allied himself with Novgorod. In June 1317, however, the Moscow Yuri suffered a defeat against Mikhail Yaroslavich. Among other things, Konchaka was captured by Mikhail.

  10. Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver Biography - Russian Grand ...

    pantheon.world › Aleksandr_Mikhailovich_of_Tver

    Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver. Grand Prince Alexander or Aleksandr Mikhailovich (Russian: Александр Михайлович Тверской; 7 October 1301 – 29 October 1339) was a Prince of Tver as Alexander I and Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal as Alexander II. His rule was marked by the Tver Uprising in 1327. Read more on Wikipedia.

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