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  1. Fabrika Zvyozd - Wikipedia

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    In the third season of 2003, one of the finalists of the show, Yulia Mikhailchik was revealed to be a romantic relantionship with the season's producer Alexander Shulgin since already before the show. During the show, Shulgin gave her more solo songs than any other contestant. Poor treatment of contestants

    • 10
    • October 13, 2002 –, December 16, 2017
    • Kruto ty popal na TV
    • Pervyi Kanal (series 1-9), Muz-TV (series 10)
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  3. Bolshevik Festivals, 1917–1920

    publishing.cdlib.org › ucpressebooks › view
    • Acknowledgments
    • Introduction Finding A Focus For Memory and Experience
    • One The Precursors Tsars, Socialists, and Poets
    • Two Revolution and Festivity
    • Three The Politics of Meaning and Style
    • Four New Uses For Popular Culture
    • Five Transformation by Festival Mass Festivals as Performance
    • Six Marking The Center Festivals and Legitimacy
    • Epilogue Time Moves on
    • Bibliography

    I have been gratified during the writing of this book by the interest I have met with on the part of my colleagues. Studying mass festivals nudged me into new and unanticipated fields, where my knowledge and skills were often minimal; and I cannot thank enough those scholars whose advice has guided my first steps. My appreciation goes to Victor Terras, Sam Driver, and Patricia Arant, who encouraged me when I chose an untraditional dissertation topic and continued to support my work. I would also like to thank Albin Konechnyi, Lewis Siegelbaum, Lynn Mally, and Hubertus Jahn for lending me their knowledge of topics beyond my ken. Alma Law gave me great joy by showing me the film of a mass spectacle, one that I had given up for lost, finally allowing me to see this thing I had studied so many years in print. Richard Stites offered essential assistance throughout the writing period, ranging from simple encouragement and fertile brainstorming to suggestions for the more mundane matter of...

    The people's army takes up position. Orders are telephoned. Movement in the streets. . . The Red Army encloses the Winter Palace in a ring of steel. . . . A demand for surrender to avoid bloodshed is written and carried to the Winter Palace by messengers with a white flag. A woman soldier receives it and passes it into the building. Waiting. . . Agitators from Smolny penetrate into the Winter Palace . They enter through cellars, past electric cables, up stairways, along elaborate galleries with chandeliers. . . . The agitators reach the Cossacks in the inner courtyard and begin talking to them. . . . A sailor in the gallery of the Winter Palace throws a grenade among the cadets. The Cossack artillery gallops out of the Palace, deserting the Government. But still no answerto the ultimatum. The envoys with the white flag return from the Palace and firing begins. . . . The cruiser Auroraopens fire on the Winter Palace. The Mayor of Petrograd at the head of the bourgeois Committee of Sa...

    By the summer of 1918, Soviet power in Voronezh was six months old, and local Bolsheviks had already formed a municipal theater department. One evening the department invited four thousand spectators to a natural amphitheater on the sloping banks of the River Voronezh for a re-creation of the city's greatest moment in history: the taking of Azov from the Turks by Peter the Great's navy, built under his supervision at the town wharves. The actors were foot soldiers of the new Red Army, stunt men from the touring Cinizelli Circus, and local yachtsmen. The presentation lasted two hours and consisted of five scenes. "The Turks in Azov," "The Battle of the Russian and Turkish Navies near Azov," "The Siege of Azov," and "The Taking of Azov by the Russians," topped off by a "Parade of the Victors." The scope of action necessitated a certain compression of dramatic time and space. An island in the middle of the river represented the Azov Fortress; prop fortifications and cannons were built...

    Tsarist celebrations were traditionally composed of two elements: a dynastic observance—a coronation or anniversary—and popular entertainment, with fairground shows, rides, and plenty of food and drink. Solemnity and merriment stood side by side. Bolshevik festivals evolved into a similar pattern by late 1918. Holiday mornings were marked by long demonstrations, eulogies, and speeches. Evenings, if funding was forthcoming from war-pressed budgets, featured fireworks, carnival games, sometimes even burnt effigies. For citizens born before the Great War, celebrations seemed incomplete without both elements. Voronezh celebrated the first anniversary of the Revolution on November 7, 1918, with a day-long affair. It began with a "Eulogy of the Revolution": The revolution's bloodier side was celebrated the same night in Voronezh with The Burning of the Hydra of Counterrevolution , inspired by a French revolutionary holiday described by Tiersot.A certain Faccioli, visiting town with the Ci...

    Rejecting the politics of the past was easier than rejecting its culture. Many older Bolsheviks, like Lenin and Lunacharsky, saw the cultural legacy as a resource and advocated saving whatever could serve the new order. Progressive culture could be salvaged and reactionary culture discarded. The more radical Proletkultists and futurists, on the contrary, saw the past as dead weight. They considered little worth saving; and even the bits of ore in the dross needed reworking. Neither side of the debate seemed to understand the dilemma fully. Lenin saw the foolishness of radical rhetoric, yet believed naively that the past could be exploited selectively. His wish to preserve the Bolshoi Theater and Tchaikovsky's operas rested on the assumption that a socialist environment would dissolve their old-regime associations. Radicals perceived the sticky web of associations that could entangle a socialist culture built on tradition, but they could not create culture in a vacuum. Even developin...

    The restrictions on professional participation that resulted from bureaucratic antimodernism and war-tightened purse strings encouraged popular participation in mass festivals during 1919. The pressing matter of survival diverted officials' attention from holidays, and the initiative sometimes made it to other hands. The popular spirit that had inspired Rousseau, Rolland, Lunacharsky, Kerzhentsev—even Wagner—finally infiltrated revolutionary festivals. People's theater (narodnyi teatr) had been a beacon for nineteenth-century liberalizers; no mere artistic phenomenon, it was a rhetorical icon for the creative energies that common people would manifest once liberated from tsarist oppression. The passion of the advocacy often obscured the phrase's muddled meanings. It could mean folk theater, specific to peasant culture; theater where peasant amateurs performed the classics; theater taken directly to the lower classes with the didactic strain typical of playwrights like Leo Tolstoy; p...

    Holidays, festivals, and spectacles rapidly acquired overriding substance in Russian political culture. In 1919 crises and landmarks were manifold: the White general Iudenich's approach to the outskirts of Petrograd; the Allied blockade; the founding of the Third International. When Petrograd Pravdaprinted a New Year 1920 chronicle of the past year, accompanied by a full page of photographs, events that had placed the Soviet republic's fate in jeopardy were strangely muted. Instead, leading items were the November 7 anniversary celebration; Soviet Propaganda Day; the May Day burning of a dragon (of counterrevolution) in effigy. Readers might have surmised some of the year's axial moments, but the moments themselves went unmentioned. Accounts of pivotal battles were supplanted by victory speeches; legislative bodies were noted not for the laws they passed but for their convo- cations. The only reference to the winter's dire heating crisis was the following paragraph: Ivanov's dictum...

    The Bolsheviks seized power in the name of an ideology that deplored centralism. Yet after the coup an attack on central authority constituted an attack on their own power. Root contradictions that underground existence had left dormant—for example, party discipline and popular initiative, revolutionary iconoclasm and central authority—could no longer be ignored. Revolution and Civil War were not times to wallow in moral vacillation, nor were the Bolsheviks given to public introspection. Yet the question of just what the party represented demanded debate and resolution. In the end principles that had united the prerevolutionary party and inspired the Revolution—for example, egalitarianism and pacifism—were discarded. How could this be the same Bolshevik party? How could it maintain authority when it violated the ideals that first legitimized its power? The Bolshevik identity was woven of many strands. There was Marxist ideology, which Lenin and his colleagues had digested and adapte...

    The Bolshevik program was inspired by Marx's philosophy, and it was shaped by years of underground struggle. Yet neither source truly prepared the Bolsheviks for the frustrations of governance or provided a political lexicon accessible to the general public. These had to be developed in the revolutionary cauldron, by trial and error. The process of adapting their complex program to mass communication compelled revolutionaries to rethink their movement, to emphasize aspects that had been secondary before the Revolution, and to push others into the background. Mass festivals were one of several venues of communication with the public, one that offered a unique conjunction of elements. They were perhaps the most public of media, which brought representatives of many groups with many opinions into intimate contact. Politicians, artists, and simple citizens were mixed in a single great performance, with the needs and particulars of each group contributing to the final product. In this se...

    Theories of Culture Current during the Revolution

    Belyi, Andrei. Revoliutsiia i kul'tura.Moscow: A. Leman i S. I. Sakharov, 1917. "Beseda s V. E. Meierkhol'dom," Vestnik teatra,no. 68 (1920), pp. 3–4. Bessal'ko, P., and F. Kalinin. Problemy proletarskoi kul'tury. Petrograd: Atenei, 1919. Bezpiatov, Evg. "Teatr pod otkrytym nebom," Narodnyi teatr,no. 3–4 (1918), pp. 25–27. Bogdanov, A. A. [Malinovskii]. Iskusstvo i rabochii klass. Moscow: Proletarskaia kul'tura, 1918. Bogdanov, A. A. [Malinovskii]. Pervoe maia. Mezhdunarodnyi prazdnik truda....

    Eyewitness Accounts of Russian Festivals

    Alianskii, S. M. "Vstrechi s Blokom," Novyi mir,no. 6 (1967). Andreeva, Mariia Fedorovna. Perepiska, vospominaniia. Stat'i, dokumenty, vospominaniia o M. F. Andreevoi. Moscow: Iskusstvo, 1961. Annenkov, Iurii. Dnevnik moikh vstrech. New York: Inter-language Literary Associates, 1966. Balabanoff, Angelica. My Life as a Rebel. New York: Harper, 1938. Beatty, Bessie. The Red Heart of Russia. New York: Century, 1918. Bekhterev, V. M. Kollektivnaia refleksologiia. Petrograd: Kolos, 1921. Benois, A...

    Prerevolutionary

    Dimanshtein, S. "Pervoe maia na katorge. Vospominaniia," Krasnaia gazeta,3 May 1919, p. 2. Meierkhol'd, V. E. "Voina i teatr," Birzhevye vedomosti(evening edition), 11 September 1914, p. 4. Meierkhol'd, V. E., and Iu. M. Bondi. "Ogon'," Liubov' k trem apel'sinam,no. 6–7 (1914). "Pervoe maia," Izvestiia Petrogradskogo soveta,1 May 1918, p. 1. Pervoe maia v tsarskoi Rossii, 1890–1916 gg.: Sbornik dokumentov. Moscow: OGIZ, 1939. Shishkov, Viach. "Maevka. Kartinka proshlogo," Novaia zhizn',20 Apr...

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