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  1. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For assistance with IPA transcriptions of Modern Hebrew for Wikipedia articles, see Help:IPA/Hebrew. This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.

    Modern Hebrew phonology - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_Hebrew_phonology
  2. Modern Hebrew - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Modern_Hebrew

    Modern Hebrew, also known as Israeli Hebrew (Hebrew: עברית חדשה ‎, ʿivrít ḥadašá [h], [ivˈʁit χadaˈʃa], lit. "Modern Hebrew" or "New Hebrew"), generally referred to by speakers simply as Hebrew (עברית ‎ Ivrit), is the standard form of the Hebrew language spoken today.

    • Israel
    • L1: 5 million (2014), (L1+L2: 9 m; L2: 4 m)
  3. Modern Hebrew grammar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Modern_Hebrew_grammar

    Modern Hebrew grammar is partly analytic, expressing such forms as dative, ablative, and accusative using prepositional particles rather than morphological cases.. On the other hand, Modern Hebrew grammar is also fusional synthetic: inflection plays a role in the formation of verbs and nouns (using non-concatenative discontinuous morphemes realised by vowel infixation) and the declension of ...

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  5. Hebrew is a Semitic language. It was first spoken in Israel. Many Jewish people also speak Hebrew, as Hebrew is part of Judaism. The Academy of the Hebrew Language is the main institution of Hebrew.

    • [(ʔ)ivˈʁit] - [(ʔ)ivˈɾit]
    • Israel, Jewish communities in Judea and Samaria; used globally as a liturgical language for Judaism
  6. Hebrew language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hebrew_language

    A Committee of the Hebrew Language was established. After the establishment of Israel, it became the Academy of the Hebrew Language. The results of Ben-Yehuda's lexicographical work were published in a dictionary (The Complete Dictionary of Ancient and Modern Hebrew). The seeds of Ben-Yehuda's work fell on fertile ground, and by the beginning ...

  7. Modern Hebrew phonology - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Modern_Hebrew_phonology

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For assistance with IPA transcriptions of Modern Hebrew for Wikipedia articles, see Help:IPA/Hebrew. This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters.

  8. Revival of the Hebrew language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Revival_of_the_Hebrew_language

    Modern Hebrew was one of three official languages of Mandatory Palestine, and after the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948, one of two official languages of Israel, along with Modern Arabic. In July 2018, a new law made Hebrew the sole official language of the state of Israel, giving Arabic a "special status".

  9. Modern Hebrew verbs - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hitpael

    In Modern Hebrew a verb has two infinitives: the infinitive construct (שם הפועל a.k.a. as מקור נסמך) and the rarely used infinitive absolute (מקור מוחלט). The infinitive construct is generally preceded by a preposition (e.g., -ב, -כ, -ל, -מ, עַד), usually the inseparable preposition -ל, meaning "to, for ...

  10. Hebrews - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Hebrews

    The terms Hebrews (Hebrew: עברים ‎ / עבריים ‎, Modern: ʿIvrim / ʿIvriyyim, Tiberian: ʿIḇrîm / ʿIḇriyyîm; ISO 259-3: ʕibrim / ʕibriyim) and Hebrew people are mostly taken as synonymous with the Semitic-speaking Israelites, especially in the pre-monarchic period when they were still nomadic.

  11. Kohen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Kohen

    Kohen (Hebrew: כֹּהֵן ‎, "priest", pl. כֹּהֲנִים ‎, [koˈ(h)anim] "priests") is the Hebrew word for "priest", used in reference to the Aaronic priesthood, also called Aaronides. Levitical priests or kohanim are traditionally believed and halakhically required to be of direct patrilineal descent from the biblical Aaron (also ...

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