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      • A negotiable certificate of deposit (NCD), also known as a jumbo CD, is a certificate of deposit (CD) with a minimum face value of $100,000, though NCDs are typically $1 million or more. They are guaranteed by the bank and can usually be sold in a highly liquid secondary market, but they cannot be cashed in before maturity.
      www.investopedia.com/terms/n/ncd.asp#:~:text=A negotiable certificate of deposit (NCD), also known,but they cannot be cashed in before maturity.
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  2. Certificate of deposit - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Certificate_of_deposit

    A certificate of deposit is a time deposit, a financial product commonly sold by banks, thrift institutions, and credit unions. CDs differ from savings accounts in that the CD has a specific, fixed term and usually, a fixed interest rate. The bank expects CD to be held until maturity, at which time they can be withdrawn and interest paid. Like savings accounts, CDs are insured "money in the bank" and thus, up to the local insured deposit limit, virtually risk free. In the US, CDs are insured by

  3. Negotiable Certificate of Deposit (NCD) Definition

    www.investopedia.com/terms/n/ncd.asp

    Jun 20, 2020 · A negotiable certificate of deposit (NCD), also known as a jumbo CD, is a certificate of deposit (CD) with a minimum face value of $100,000, though NCDs are typically $1 million or more. They are...

  4. Negotiable order of withdrawal account - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negotiable_Order_of...

    In the United States, a negotiable order of withdrawal account (NOW account) is a deposit account that pays interest on which an unlimited number of checks may be written. [1] A negotiable order of withdrawal is essentially identical to a check drawn on a demand deposit account , but US banking regulations define the terms "demand deposit account" and "negotiable order of withdrawal account" separately.

  5. Negotiable instrument - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar-Denominated...

    A negotiable instrument is a document guaranteeing the payment of a specific amount of money, either on demand, or at a set time, whose payer is usually named on the document. More specifically, it is a document contemplated by or consisting of a contract, which promises the payment of money without condition, which may be paid either on demand or at a future date. The term has different meanings depending on the use of the term as it is used in the application of different laws, and depending i

  6. Negotiable Certificate of Deposit (NCD) Definition & Example ...

    investinganswers.com/dictionary/n/negotiable...

    Aug 28, 2020 · A negotiable certificate of deposit (NCD) is a certificate of deposit that differs from a conventional CD in that its terms are negotiated with the issuer. Another difference is that it can be sold in the secondary markets before maturity. The NCD cannot be redeemed before maturity, but the investor can sell it to realize its value.

  7. Talk:Certificate of deposit - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Certificate_of_deposit

    The major attraction for CD's in UK was that the Depositers could be easily influenced to put their savings into the banks for a longer term deposit if it was covered by a negotiable market, whereas, in case of Term Deposits,if a depositer wants to withdraw its money before maturity date, there are several number of penalties levied on him.

  8. Negotiable certificate of deposit financial definition of ...

    financial-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/...

    Negotiable Certificate of Deposit A certificate of deposit of large value that can be bought and sold but not redeemed before maturity. See also: Jumbo CD, Callable CD. Farlex ...

  9. Banknote - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknote

    The first banknote-type instrument was used in China in the 7th century, during the Tang dynasty (618–907). Merchants would issue what is today called promissory notes in the form of receipts of deposit to wholesalers to avoid using the heavy bulk of copper coinage in large commercial transactions.

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