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  1. Oct 29, 2009 · Nixon’s Attorney General of the United States John Mitchell served 19 months for his role in the scandal, while Watergate mastermind G. Gordon Liddy, a former FBI agent, served four and a half ...

  2. Richard Nixon, 37th president of the United States (1969–74), who, faced with almost certain impeachment for his role in the Watergate scandal, became the first American president to resign from office. He was also vice president (1953–61) under President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

  3. Nixon's own reaction to the break-in, at least initially, was one of skepticism. Watergate prosecutor James Neal was sure that Nixon had not known in advance of the break-in. As evidence, he cited a conversation taped on June 23 between the President and his chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman, in which Nixon asked, "Who was the asshole that did that?"

  4. The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to have spied on and harassed political opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions and covered up their own misdeeds. On June 17, 1972, The Washington Post published a small story. In this story, the reporters stated that five…

  5. Jun 08, 2012 · On June 17, 1971 — exactly one year before the Watergate break-in — Nixon met in the Oval Office with his chief of staff, H.R. “Bob” Haldeman, and national security adviser Henry Kissinger ...

  6. May 13, 2014 · The Watergate scandal was a major political scandal that happened in the United States between 1972 and 1974. It began with a break-in at the headquarters of Democratic National Committee at the office complex called Watergate – hence the name, in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 1972. The burglary and subsequent attempts of the Nixon administration … Continue reading Watergate Scandal Summary

  7. The impeachment process against Richard Nixon began in the United States House of Representatives on October 30, 1973, following the series of high-level resignations and firings widely called the "Saturday Night Massacre" during the course of the Watergate scandal.

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