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  1. Characteristics of the urban forests in arctic and near ...

    www.sciencedirect.com › science › article

    Jan 01, 2012 · Arctic and near-arctic environments are characterized by low temperature. Cold winter temperatures for more northern locations in the Arctic average as low as −40 °C with record low temperatures of −69.8 °C recorded in Snag, Canada in 1892 and −68 °C in Oymyakon, Siberia in 1933 (Athropolis, 2005).

    • Joe R. McBride, Vladimir Douhovnikoff
    • 7
    • 2012
  2. Apr 28, 2021 · An iceberg floats in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland on Aug. 1, 2017. Greenland's glaciers have been melting and retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due to warmer temperatures. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  3. Dahr Jamail | As Climate Disruption Advances, UN Warns: "The ...

    truthout.org › articles › as-climate-disruption

    May 02, 2016 · Greenland’s capital of Nuuk reached 62 degrees Fahrenheit, smashing the April record high temperature by a whopping 6.5 degrees. Inland from there, at Kangerlussuaq, it was 64 degrees, a temperature that on the same day was warmer than it was in St. Louis and San Francisco.

  4. Satellites show world's glaciers melting faster than ever ...

    dailyjournalonline.com › news › science

    Apr 28, 2021 · An iceberg floats in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland on Aug. 1, 2017. Greenland's glaciers have been melting and retreating at an accelerated pace in recent years due ...

  5. What is the safest warmest place to live? - Quora

    www.quora.com › What-is-the-safest-warmest-place

    Dec 05, 2020 · Greenland, where you might like to opt for a life in the capital, Nuuk; here, the temperature is also currently 3 degrees. But there are more places like that. You could look at Invercargill, at the southern tip of New Zealand, for example. I lived nearby for a few years, and golly, were we ever chilled there, most of the time.

  6. The NOAA Temperature Record Is A Complete Fraud | Real Science

    stevengoddard.wordpress.com › 2016/01/21 › the-noaa

    Jan 21, 2016 · The NOAA Temperature Record Is A Complete Fraud. NOAA has no idea what historical temperatures are. In 1900, almost all of their global min/max temperature data was from the US. Their only good data, the US temperature data, is then massively altered to cool the past. But their fraud is even worse than it seems.

  7. Muskox status, recent variation, and uncertain future ...

    link.springer.com › article › 10

    Jun 11, 2019 · However, there is wide thermal variability within their endemic habitat (mean summer maximums of 21°–27 °C to mean winter minimums of − 34 °C: Tener 1965).

  8. The Fishery for Iceland Scallop (Chlamys islandica) in the ...

    www.sciencedirect.com › science › article

    Jan 01, 2006 · The general biology of the Iceland scallop is summarised and compared with the biology of other North Atlantic species of pectinids. The Icelandic fishery dates from 1969. There was a steady decrease in catch from 1985, when >16,000 tonnes were caught. By 2004 the stock had declined to 35% of its average size during the period 1993–2000 and a ...

  9. EBM4: The State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report ...

    www.arcticbiodiversity.is › index › ebm4-the
    • Presentations
    • Sea Ice Biota Key Findings and Information Gaps
    • Plankton Key Findings and Information Gaps
    • Benthos Key Findings and Information Gaps
    • Sambr and Cbird
    • Marine Mammals Key Findings and Information Gaps
    • An Analysis of Sambr Implementation
    Introductory remarks: Alain Dupuis, Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    Sea ice biota key findings and information gaps: Cecilie von Quillfeldt, Norwegian Polar Institute
    Plankton key findings and information gaps: Connie Lovejoy, Université Laval
    Benthos key findings and information gaps: Lis Lindal Jorgensen, Institute of Marine Research

    Haakon Hop, Norwegian Polar Institute and UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Bodil A. Bluhm, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Igor A. Melnikov, P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Moscow, Russia Michel Poulin, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Mikko Vihtakari, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway R. Eric Collins, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska, U.S. Rolf Gradinger, UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Thomas Juul-Pedersen, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland Cecilie von Quillfeldt, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway Sea ice is an important Arctic habitat that supports a high diversity of species—with over 1276 protist taxa alone. Multi-year sea ice is being replaced by first-year ice and open water, which will cause shifts in ice algal communities with cascading effects on the ice-associated ecosystem. Documentation of ice biota composition, abundance and...

    Connie Lovejoy, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada Cecilie von Quillfeldt, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway Russell R. Hopcroft, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Fairbanks, U.S. Michel Poulin, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Mary Thaler, Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada Kristin Arendt, Greenland Institute of Natural Resource, Nuuk, Greenland Hogni Debes, University of the Faroe Islands, Torshavn, Faroe Islands Ástþór Gíslason, Marine and Freshwater Research Institute, Reykjavík, Iceland Ksenia Kosobokova, P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Moscow, Russia Microbial and multicellular plankton and multicellular zooplankton are the base of the pelagic Arctic marine food web, that together channel essential energy and carbon to fishes, seabirds and marine mammals. Changes in planktonic species can have cascading effects throughout the ecosystem and can represent the first sign of overall ecosystem shifts. Despite their importance, t...

    Virginie Roy, Canadian Museum of Nature, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Canada, Lis Lindal Jørgensen, Institute of Marine Research, Norway, Philippe Archambault, Université Laval, Canada, Martin Blicher, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Greenland, Nina Denisenko, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, Guðmundur Guðmundsson, Icelandic Institute of Natural History, Iceland, Katrin Iken, University of Alaska Fairbanks, U.S, Jan Sørensen, Faroese Museum of Natural History, Faroe Islands, Natalia Anisimova, Polar Research Institute of Marine Fisheries and Oceanography, Russia, Carolina Behe, Inuit Circumpolar Council, Alaska, U.S., Stanislav Denisenko, Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia, Vera Metcalf, Inuit Circumpolar Council, Canada, Steinunn Olafsdóttir, Marine Research Institute, Iceland, Tom Schiøtte, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Ole Tendal, Natural History Museum of Denmark, Alexandra M. Ravelo, University of Alaska Fairbanks,...

    Kathy Kuletz, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S. Mark Mallory, Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada Grant Gilchrist, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Greg Robertson, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Mount Pearl, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada Flemming Merkel, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Bergur Olsen, Faroe Marine Research Institute, Torshavn, Faroe Islands Erpur Hansen, South Iceland Nature Centre, Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland Mia Rönkä, Biodiversity Unit, University of Turku, Turku, Finland Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, Trondheim, Norway Hallvard Strøm, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway Sebastien Déscamps, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway Maria Gavrilo Arctic & Antarctic Research Institute (AARI), Saint-Petersburg, Russia Robert Kaler, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S. David Irons, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Anchorage, Alaska, U.S. A...

    R.H. Meehan, ArcticTurn Consulting, Anchorage, U.S., K.M. Kovacs, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway (CBMP- MM Expert Group Leader) S. Belikov, All Russian Research Institute for Nature Protection, Moscow, Russia G. Desportes, North Atlantic Marine Mammal Commission, Tromsø, Norway S.H. Ferguson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, Canada K.L. Laidre, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland G.B. Stenson, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, St John, Canada P.O. Thomas, Marine Mammal Commission, Washington D.C., U.S. F. Ugarte, Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk, Greenland D. Vongraven, Norwegian Polar Institute, Tromsø, Norway Marine mammals are top predators in Arctic marine ecosystems and are key to ecosystem functioning. Many Arctic marine mammal species are important resources and hold special cultural significance in Arctic communities. The CBMP (Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Programme) Marine Mammal Expert Network aggregated and reviewed d...

    Rosa Meehan, ArcticTurn Preparation and production of the 2017 State of the Arctic Marine Biodiversity Report for the Arctic Council represents a significant amount of effort by the Circumpolar Marine Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP). To assess the general awareness and use of the SAMBR, we interviewed key stakeholders throughout the U.S. federal government, representatives of the State of Alaska and local government, as well as some other experts. Intended as a preliminary evaluation, the interviews focused on participant knowledge about and use of the report. Key findings of the SAMBR generally resonated with the people contacted. In particular, the findings articulate broadly recognized patterns that matched observations and data collected by agency scientists. The findings are also similar to basic premises used in environmental analyses. Some of the overlap is due to the direct involvement of people interviewed in either contributing to or participating in the preparation...

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