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  1. Oatlands Palace is a former Tudor and Stuart royal palace which took the place of the former manor of the village of Oatlands near Weybridge, Surrey.Little remains of the original building, so excavations of the palace took place in 1964 to rediscover its extent.

    Oatlands Palace - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oatlands_Palace
  2. Oatlands Palace - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oatlands_Palace

    Oatlands Palace is a former Tudor and Stuart royal palace which took the place of the former manor of the village of Oatlands near Weybridge, Surrey.Little remains of the original building, so excavations of the palace took place in 1964 to rediscover its extent.

  3. Oatlands Palace | Royal Palaces | An Encyclopedia of British ...

    www.royalpalaces.com/palaces/oatlands-palace

    Few people have heard of Oatlands Palace. After the Restoration of 1660 it was demolished so thoroughly that nothing remained other than a few garden walls. Today its site is covered by a housing estate. But in the sixteenth and early seventeenth century Oatlands was as well known as a royal palace as Hampton Court.

  4. Oatlands Palace, Elmbridge - 1019192 | Historic England

    historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list...

    Oatlands and its associated deer park lay within the newly-created royal hunting forest known as the Honour of Hampton Court, also served by Nonsuch Palace 13km to the east at Ewell, and centred on Hampton Court Palace less than 1km to the north east.

    • A History of Weybridge (Surrey England)
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  5. Oatlands Palace, Surrey, England - geni.com

    www.geni.com/projects/Oatlands-Palace-Surrey...
    • The Palace
    • The House
    • The Mansion and Hotel

    Much of the foundation stone for the palace came from Chertsey Abbey which fell into ruins after the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Henry VIII acquired the house in 1538, and rebuilt it for Anne of Cleves. The palace was built around three main adjoining quadrangular courtyards covering fourteen hectares and utilising an existing 15th-century moated manor house. He married Catherine Howard in the palace on 28 July 1540. It subsequently became the residence, at various times, of Mary I, Elizabeth I, James I and Charles I. It was to Oatlands that Mary Tudor retreated after her supposed pregnancy. Her previous residence, Hampton Court Palace, had housed the nursery staff that was assembled for the birth of the child. The announcement of a movement to Oatlands (considerably smaller than Hampton) ended any hope of a happy outcome of the Queen's pregnancy. James I's wife Anne of Denmark employed Inigo Jones to design an ornamental gateway from the Privy Garden to the Park. In 1646, it wa...

    This was later occupied and extended by Sir Edward Herbert, the Lord Chief Justice, but was forfeited to the Crown when he followed James II into exile. It was then awarded to his brother, Arthur Herbert, 1st Earl of Torrington, who was later the admiral in command of the English and Dutch Fleets at the Battle of Beachy Head. The house was again enlarged by the Duke of Newcastle, Henry Clinton, who laid out formal gardens. In 1790, Oatlands was leased from the Crown by the Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany the second son of George III, and the subject of the nursery rhyme The Grand Old Duke of York. His architect was Henry Holland. In his second London notebook, composer Joseph Haydn recorded a two-day visit in November 1791. He says: The little castle, 18 miles from London, lies on a slope and commands the most glorious view. Among its many beauties is a most remarkable grotto which cost £25 000 sterling, and which was 11 years in the building. It is very large and contains...

    In 1794 the mansion was burnt down and was then rebuilt in the Gothic style of the period. After the death of the Duchess of York in 1820, the whole property was sold. It was bought by Edward Hughes Ball Hughes in 1824 (although it was not until after The Duke's death in 1827 that the sale was finally concluded) and again remodelled in 1830. Hughes had tried to dispose of the estate by public auction in 1829 but this part did not sell. He let the mansion and adjoining parkland to Francis, Lord Egerton for a seven-year period in 1832 and renewed for a similar period in 1839. The arrival of the London and South Western Railway in 1838 made the area ripe for daily commuting to Town. In 1846 the estate was broken up into lots for building development and sold at three public auctions in May, August and September of that year. Following a period of private ownership by James Watts Peppercorne, the house became a hotel in 1856, known as the South Western (later Oatlands Park) Hotel. From...

  6. Oatlands Palace and its Ill-Fated, Summer Bride | The Tudor ...

    thetudortravelguide.com/2019/02/16/oatlands-palace

    Oatlands Palace – The Queen’s Palace . By the mid 1530’s, the principal country seat of the English monarchy had moved westwards from Greenwich to Hampton Court. According to Simon Thurley’s contribution in Poulton’s Excavations at Oatlands Palace, the acquisition of Oatlands in 1537 from the wealthy Reed family was:

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  8. Oatlands Palace, Weybridge Riverside, Surrey

    ancientmonuments.uk/117393-oatlands-palace...
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    The monument includes the main courtyards and associated buildings of Oatlands Palace, situated on the southern bank of the River Thames at Weybridge, on the south western outskirts of modern metropolitan London. The palace, which survives in the form of below ground foundations, associated buried remains and restored ruins, was constructed mainly between 1537-45 for Henry VIII. Oatlands and its associated deer park lay within the newly-created royal hunting forest known as the Honour of Hampton Court, also served by Nonsuch Palace 13km to the east at Ewell, and centred on Hampton Court Palace less than 1km to the north east. The new chase and royal residences were close to the capital because the ageing King's deteriorating health prevented him from travelling to his favourite hunting grounds in Oxfordshire. Although essentially a private royal residence, Oatlands was built on a grand scale around three main, adjoining quandrangular courtyards covering approximately 14ha. The palac...

    Oatlands forms part of a group of broadly contemporary royal palaces, including Hampton Court and Nonsuch, built around the south western periphery of London by Henry VIII. Although modelled around an existing, earlier house, the main planning of the palace displays a typically Tudor emphasis on symmetry, balance and order, ornamented by more fanciful architectural elements such as tall corner towers and lanterns. Oatlands was, however, unusual in that, unlike the contemporary grand residences with which it is associated, the majority of its buildings had gabled roofs without crenellated parapets, a departure from the standard, mock-militaristic style of much Tudor architecture. Although largely surviving in the form of below ground archaeological remains, Oatlands Palace is comparatively well documented by detailed building accounts, contemporary descriptions and illustrations. Archaeological excavation has confirmed that the monument retains important evidence relating to the orig...

    Books and journals Colvin, H M, The History of the King's Works 1485-1660 , (1982) Poulton, R, Oatlands Palace, (1984) Cook, A, 'Surrey Archaeological Collections' in Oatlands Palace Excavations 1968 Interim Report, , Vol. 66, (1969), 1-9 Other Poulton, R, (1997) Source: Historic England

    • Oatlands Palace, Weybridge Riverside, Surrey
  9. Oatlands Palace (The Gatehouse Record)

    www.gatehouse-gazetteer.info/English sites/3994.html

    Oatlands Palace has been described as a certain Palace. There are masonry ruins/remnants remains. This site is a scheduled monument protected by law. This is a Grade 2 listed building protected by law*.

  10. Oatlands Palace History - Weybridge Society

    www.weybridgesociety.org.uk/local-info/history/...

    Oatlands Palace History The name Oatlands comes from the owners of the land, who in the thirteenth century was Robert dc Ottelond and probably refers to the crop of oats grown in the area. Henry VIII purchased Hampton Court from Cardinal Wolsey, who then built a palace in Esher on land he had acquired.

  11. Hoydens & Firebrands: Oatlands Palace

    hoydensandfirebrands.blogspot.com/2013/12/...

    Dec 29, 2013 · Oatlands was primarily the Queen’s palace, with Hampton Court (the King’s palace) and Nonsuch (the Prince’s palace).The demolition of 1650 left only a wall of the outer court standing. The contents of a series of garderobes, containing material of the 1640s, were sealed by demolition rubble, and form the most interesting of the finds from ...

    • Anita Davison
  12. A Royal Tudor history - Oatlands Park Hotel

    www.oatlandsparkhotel.com/a-royal-tutor-history

    A Royal Tudor history Our Tudor History: At Oatlands Park Hotel, there’s no escaping the sense that you are walking in the shadows of Kings and Queens. Our historic hotel has a royal Tudor history dating back to 1537 and is built on the original site of a grand Royal Tudor Palace which was once home to the Kings and Queens of England. You ...