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  1. Ojibwe language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anishinaabemowin

    Ojibwe / oʊˈdʒɪbweɪ /, also known as Ojibwa / oʊˈdʒɪbwə /, Ojibway or Otchipwe, is an indigenous language of North America of the Algonquian language family. The language is characterized by a series of dialects that have local names and frequently local writing systems.

    • (90,000 cited 1990–2010, 100,880 including all other dialects not included in Ethnologue.)
    • Ojibwe people
  2. Ojibwe - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ojibwe

    The Ojibwe language is known as Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwemowin, and is still widely spoken, although the number of fluent speakers has declined sharply. Today, most of the language's fluent speakers are elders. Since the early 21st century, there is a growing movement to revitalize the language and restore its stren

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    What language did the Ojibwe speak?

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    What is the purpose of the Ojibwe dictionary?

    What language is closely related to oji?

  4. Talk:Ojibwe language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Ojibwe_language

    There are three 'main' Ojibwe language pages: Ojibwa-Ottawa language (oji) Ojibwa language (oji) Ojibwa-Potawatomi-Ottawa language no Ethnologue code I believe. A few observations, based on the published literature on Ojibwe and its dialects: There is a single Ojibwe language with multiple dialects.

  5. Anishinaabe - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anishinaabe

    Ojibwe, Ojibwa, Chippewa (or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). Potawatomi is a Central Algonquian language.

  6. Anishinaabe clan system - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodem

    The Ojibwe word for clan (doodem) was borrowed into English as totem. The clans, based mainly on animals, were instrumental in traditional occupations, intertribal relations, and marriages. The clans, based mainly on animals, were instrumental in traditional occupations, intertribal relations, and marriages.

  7. The Ojibwe People's Dictionary

    ojibwe.lib.umn.edu

    Ojibwe is not a single standardized language, but a chain of linked local varieties, grouped into nearly a dozen dialects. Each dialect (and within dialects, each local variety) differs in details of pronunciation, vocabulary and grammar from the others, with differences between non-adjacent dialects often being great enough to impede understanding between their speakers. Speakers of Ojibwe consider their language to be precise, descriptive, and visual, and feel that it is among the greatest ...

  8. Animism - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animism

    Animism (from Latin: anima, 'breath, spirit, life') is the belief that objects, places, and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence. Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork, and perhaps even words—as animated and alive.

  9. Cant (language) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cant_language

    A cant is the jargon or language of a group, often employed to exclude or mislead people outside the group. It may also be called a cryptolect, argot, anti-language or secret language. Each term differs slightly in meaning; their use is inconsistent.

  10. Ojibwa | people | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Ojibwa

    Ojibwa, also spelled Ojibwe or Ojibway, also called Chippewa, self-name Anishinaabe, Algonquian-speaking North American Indian tribe who lived in what are now Ontario and Manitoba, Can., and Minnesota and North Dakota, U.S., from Lake Huron westward onto the Plains. Their name for themselves means “original people.”

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