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      • French is a Romance language (meaning that it is descended primarily from Vulgar Latin) that evolved out of the Gallo-Romance spoken in northern France.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_French#:~:text=French%20is%20a%20Romance%20language%20%28meaning%20that%20it,out%20of%20the%20Gallo-Romance%20spoken%20in%20northern%20France.
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    Where was the French language originally spoken?

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  2. History of French - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_French

    French is a Romance language (meaning that it is descended primarily from Vulgar Latin) that evolved out of the Gallo-Romance.. The discussion of the history of a language is typically divided into "external history", describing the ethnic, political, social, technological, and other changes that affected the languages, and "internal history", describing the phonological and grammatical ...

  3. French language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_language

    In Wallis and Futuna, the percentage of the population who reported that French was the language they use the most at home rose from 10% at the 2008 census to 13% at the 2018 census. Future. The future of the French language is often discussed in the news.

    • distribution maps below
    • 76.8 million worldwide, An estimated 274 million French speakers (L1 plus L2; 2014)
  4. List of English words of French origin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of...

    Words of French origin often refer to more abstract or elaborate notions than their Anglo-Saxon equivalents (e.g. liberty / freedom, justice / fairness), and are therefore of less frequent use in everyday language. This may not, however, be the case for all English words of French origin.

  5. List of French words of Gaulish origin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_French_words_of...

    The Gaulish language, and presumably its many dialects and closely allied sister languages, left a few hundred words in French and many more in nearby Romance languages, i.e. Franco-Provençal (Eastern France and Western Switzerland), Occitan (Southern France), Catalan, Romansch, Gallo-Italian (Northern Italy), and many of the regional languages of northern France and Belgium collectively ...

    French
    Cognates
    Etymology
    Possible Celtic Cognates
    aller 'to go'
    FrProv alâ, allar, Friul lâ
    Gaul *allu
    Welsh êl 'that he may go', eled 'go!', Cornish ellev 'that I may go', Old Irish adall 'diverticulum'
    alose 'shad'
    Occitan alausa, Prov alauso, La Rochelle alousa, Sp alosa, G Alse
    Gaul alausa 'allis shad'
    none
    alouette 'lark'
    Walloon alôye, Prov alauza, alauseta, Cat alosa, alova, OSp aloa, Sp alondra, It allodola, lodola
    Old French aloe, aloue, fr Latin alauda 'crest lark', fr Gaul, perhaps from *alaio 'swan'
    OIr elu 'swan', Irish/Scottish eala 'swan'; with suffix, Welsh alarch 'lark', Breton alarc'h 'swan'
    ambassade 'embassy'
    Prov embeissado, Occ ambaissada, Port embaixada, Sp embajada
    From Ital ambasciata 'charge, mission, embassy', fr Old Occ ambayassada 'embassy', from ambaissa 'service, duty' 'hostage', fr Gaul ambactus 'dependant, vassal'
    OIr amos, amsach 'mercenary, servant', Ir amhas 'wild man', W amaeth 'tenant farm', C ammeth 'farming', OBr ambaith
  6. France - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/France

    The French Renaissance saw a spectacular cultural development and the first standardisation of the French language, which would become the official language of France and the language of Europe's aristocracy. It also saw a long set of wars, known as the Italian Wars, between France and the House of Habsburg.

    • +33
    • dd/mm/yyyy (AD)
  7. Lists of English words by country or language of origin ...

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_English_words_by...

    The following are lists of words in the English language that are known as "loanwords" or "borrowings," which are derived from other languages.. For purely native (Anglo-Saxon-derived) words, see List of English words of Anglo-Saxon origin.

  8. The sign alphabet created by l-Épée, however, is not the origin of French Sign Language, the sign language that has influenced many other sign languages around the world. Even before l-Épée started teaching deaf people, they already used Old French Sign Language, and could read and write in French.

  9. cliché - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cliché
    • English
    • Dutch
    • French
    • Italian
    • Polish
    • Spanish

    Alternative forms

    1. cliche

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cliché.

    Pronunciation

    1. (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkliːʃeɪ/ 2. Rhymes: -iːʃeɪ 3. (US) enPR: klē-shāʹ, IPA(key): /kliːˈʃeɪ/ 4. Rhymes: -eɪ

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cliché.

    Pronunciation

    1. Hyphenation: cli‧ché

    Noun

    cliché n (plural clichés, diminutive clichétje n) 1. cliché

    Etymology

    Past participle of clicher (“to stereotype, (originally) to copy”, literally “to click, clink”), from Middle French clicher, from Old French cliquer (“to click, clack, sound, resound”), of Germanic origin, related to Dutch klikken (“to click, rattle”), Low German klikken (“to click”), German klicken (“to click”), Danish klikke (“to click”), Swedish klicka (“to click”). Probably onomatopoeic, and probably influenced by Middle High German klitsch (“soft, pulpy mass”), from the old technique of...

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /kli.ʃe/

    Noun

    cliché m (plural clichés) 1. (printing) stereotype (printing plate) 1.1. La reproduction dans la presse de dessins et de photographies se fait au moyen de clichés typographiques. 1.1.1. (please add an English translation of this usage example) 2. (photography) negative 3. (by extension) snapshot 3.1. prendre un cliché ― take a snapshot 4. (figuratively) cliché; stereotype (overused phrase or expression)

    Alternative forms

    1. cliscè

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cliché.

    Noun

    cliché m (invariable) 1. plate(printing) 2. cliché

    Etymology

    From French cliché.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /klʲiˈʂɛ/

    Noun

    cliché n 1. cliché

    Alternative forms

    1. clisé

    Etymology

    Borrowed from French cliché.

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /kliˈt͡ʃe/

  10. Romanian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_language

    Romanian (dated spellings: Rumanian or Roumanian; autonym: limba română [ˈlimba roˈmɨnə] (), "the Romanian language", or românește, lit. "in Romanian") is a Balkan Romance language spoken by approximately 24–26 million people as a native language, primarily in Romania and Moldova, and by another 4 million people as a second language.

  11. bert/multilingual.md at master · google-research/bert · GitHub

    github.com/google-research/bert/blob/master/...

    Oct 17, 2019 · The entire Wikipedia dump for each language (excluding user and talk pages) was taken as the training data for each language. However, the size of the Wikipedia for a given language varies greatly, and therefore low-resource languages may be "under-represented" in terms of the neural network model (under the assumption that languages are ...