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    Why do young Catholics leave the church?

    Why do Christians leave the church?

    Why do Catholics leave the Catholic Church?

    Why I left Catholicism?

  2. Jun 15, 2020 · This is such an important topic. I understand the many reasons you have explored as to why people leave the Catholic Church. It is definitely NOT because of Vatican II. Unless there was a Vatican II the Catholic Church would be ‘totally’ irrelevant today (I believe). The Church must live in the world as it is today, not as it was in the past.

  3. Apr 27, 2009 · Likes and dislikes about religious institutions, organizations and people are also cited by large numbers of converts as the main reason for leaving Catholicism; nearly four-in-ten former Catholics who are now unaffiliated (36%) say they left the Catholic Church primarily for these reasons, as do nearly three-in-ten former Catholics who are now ...

  4. Jan 11, 2020 · “Why I left the Church,” with reasons (excuses, rationalizations, attempted justifications) to follow. Although people have lots of personal reasons for leaving the Church, in the end, they don’t hold water. There’s never a good reason to leave the Church. By Barbara Case Speers 11 January 2020

    • Why Young People Leave The Church and What We Can Do About It
    • What Is The Scale of The Problem?
    • Why Is This Happening? and Where Are People Going?
    • Education, Education and Education
    • Where Do People Who Leave The Church Go and Why?
    • Just What Do We Want to Form Anyway?
    • The Problem of Disney Jesus
    • Back to Basics

    ‘The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.’This quote has been attributed to Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin and Mark Twain, but it turns out that this isn’t actually the definition of insane at all (by law courts or by dictionaries) and it was probably never said by any of those esteemed gentlemen, it just kind of floats around the internet briefly inspiring people scrolling Facebook. Nevertheless, it is an interesting place to start talking about how many young people leave the Catholic Church. This year I heard a friend use it in the context of a story she told about the day before the confirmation of one of her classes: ‘Then one girl piped up with perhaps the most honest thing she had said all year: “I’m not even sure I believe in God, you know.” It hit me like plunging into ice-cold water – it took my breath away. In one and the same moment I loved that this girl had finally and honestly said what was on her mind, but...

    The most recent detailed statistics for Christians leaving the Church are probably those that come from the Pew Research Center’s ‘America’s Changing Religious Landscape’ report, most recently from 2015. ‘The major new survey of more than 35,000 Americans by the Pew Research Center finds that the percentage of adults (ages 18 and older) who describe themselves as Christians has dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years, from 78.4% in an equally massive Pew Research survey in 2007 to 70.6% in 2014. Over the same period, the percentage of Americans who are religiously unaffiliated – describing themselves as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular” – has jumped more than six pointsfrom 16.1% to 22.8%.’ This continues a much spoken about trend – the decline of Christians and the rise of the ‘nones’; the non-affiliated with religion, these declines that the report notes are mostly ‘among mainline Protestants and Catholics’. Wondering what generation is the most un...

    This shift throws up all of the hard questions I posed at the beginning, and the answer to ‘what’s going on here?’ has to be that the world has been in a period of rapid change in the last fifty years. Canadian priest Fr James Mallon in his book ‘Divine Renovation’puts this well. ‘Fast forward through the 60s, the sexual revolution, mass media, new media, postmodernism, materialism, relativism, individualism, hedonism and every other “ism” we can think of and all of a sudden the fault lines are revealed for all to see. Hundreds of thousands of faithful, believing Catholics carry the enormous burden of children and grandchildren who have abandoned “the faith”. These faithful Catholics carry the extra burden of blaming themselves for this situation, unsure of what they did wrong: after all, they did for their children what their parents did for them. Pointing fingers is, well, pointless. The fact is that the rules have all changed. We no longer have the cultural props we had before, a...

    So what do young Catholics currently receive in terms of faith formation? Sherry Weddel tracks the history of this very well in her book ‘Forming Intentional Disciples’.‘Since the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, the Catholic retention strategy has been (a) childhood catechesis and (b) sacramental initiation.Four hundred years ago, CCD (Confraternity of Christian Doctrine) and the Catholic school system were cutting-edge responses to the crisis of the Protestant Reformation. Setting out to give every Catholic child a solid catechetical background was an extraordinary vision that had never before been attempted. The endeavor was deeply influenced by a Renaissance optimism about the power of education. The assumption was that a carefully nurtured religious identity acquired in childhood would endure throughout life. The Jesuit motto said it all: “Give me a child until he is seven, and I will give you the man.”’ Now, I don’t know about you, but most of my problems in lif...

    To answer this, Weddell again has some really interesting insights. When discussing the 2008’s ‘U.S. Religious Landscape Survey: Religious Beliefs and Practices’ reportfrom Pew, she tracks the behaviours of those who leave and it gives some interesting results. ‘There are two basic paths or tracks taken by the vast majority. The 15 percent who eventually become Protestant (Track A) – which includes the 9 percent who join evangelical communities – are motivated differently than the 114 percent who become “nones” or “unaffiliated” (Track B). … Catholics who become Protestant say that their strongest reason for doing so was “that my spiritual needs were not being met.”Interestingly, cradle Protestants who join a different kind of Protestant faith, as well as those “nones” who were raised without a faith but chose one as an adult also told Pew researchers that this was their primary reason for changing faiths. Hence, all three groups share a similar basic motivation for their spiritual...

    Having established the scale and why many leave, we can now talk about the ideal. What is it that we would want to form people to be? What’s the aim? What does this ideal, thriving, young Church look like? Again Fr James Mallon has a fantastic section on this. He begins with what is called the Great Commission, the last words of Jesus to his disciples in Matthew’s gospel, the purpose he clearly outlines for His Church, it reads as follows. ‘Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore goand make disciplesof all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,and teachingthem to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”’ Matthew 28: 18-20 Fr Mallon then carries out an interesting test. Bear with the grammar lesson, it gets fun I promise. ‘Jesus gave his nascent Church four tasks: go, make, baptize and teach. Of these four imperat...

    However, as we’ve established, the Church doesn’t look like that, and the confusion about our core purpose, beliefs and founder is pretty deep. In England & Wales this year, the Catholic Youth Ministry Federation published a report called ‘Complex Catholicism’a survey of 1,005 Catholics between fifteen and twenty-five, involving both self-identified or non-identifying Catholics. It reported that 38% of self-identified young Catholics believe that Jesus was just human. That was tough to read, but clearly shows that we are very far from coaching young people into a lifelong learning about the person of Jesus, as many are not even on board with the reason why He is worth listening to, His Divinity, His central claim. Without that, He is not worth our time, as C.S. Lewis put it, ‘You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse.’ Weddel presents a similar statistic in her book, again sourced from Pew’s 2008 survey ‘only 48 perce...

    Without being offered a more mature understanding of Jesus, one who is life changing, who offers forgiveness for sins, who dwells in His Church and in the Sacraments, young people are not going to be evangelised – and if they are not evangelised, of course they will leave. We need to go further back to the fundamentals and to properly build a clear vision of Jesus, so that we don’t keep bringing kids to Confirmation who don’t believe in God. In truth, the Church needs a culture shift to engage young people, it needs to walk the walk not just talk the talk, it needs to articulate clearly that its purpose is to make disciples, to bring people to personal relationship with Jesus. This culture shift is essential because of the 38% of young British Catholics who think Jesus is just human and the 48% of adult American Catholics who don’t believe in a personal God. Because that’s the point of it all and that’s ultimately what we want for our young people, to be engaged in lifelong learning...

  5. Mar 13, 2011 · 1. You’ve left the Catholic faith without even realizing it—one day you just stop attending and never look back. You never felt connected to the Church or parish and no one has even noticed you are not there anymore. 2. You left because you’ve married a non-Catholic and decide to embrace that faith instead. 3.

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