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  1. Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygian_language

    The Phrygian language (/ ˈ f r ɪ dʒ i ə n /) was the Indo-European language of the Phrygians, spoken in Anatolia (modern Turkey), during classical antiquity (c. 8th century BC to 5th century AD). Plato observed that some Phrygian words resembled Greek ones. [4]

  2. Phrygia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygia

    Phrygian language Phrygian continued to be spoken until the 6th century AD, though its distinctive alphabet was lost earlier than those of most Anatolian cultures. [2] One of the Homeric Hymns describes the Phrygian language as not mutually intelligible with that of Troy , [6] and inscriptions found at Gordium make clear that Phrygians spoke an ...

    • Dominant kingdom in Asia Minor from c. 1200–700 BC
    • Phrygian
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  4. Armeno-Phrygian languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Armeno-Phrygian_languages

    Armeno-Phrygian languages. Paleo-Balkan languages and peoples in Eastern Europe and Anatolia between 5th and 1st century BC. The name Armeno-Phrygian is used for a hypothetical language branch, which would include the languages spoken by the Phrygians and the Armenians, and would be a branch of the Indo-European language family, or a sub-branch ...

  5. Talk:Phrygian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Talk:Phrygian_language
    • Comments
    • Armenians
    • Verifying
    • Mysian
    • Phrygian Sentences
    • Bukë
    • Ent Changes by 66.81.157.116
    • Removed Unsourced Matterial
    • Attagos
    • Vocabulary List

    There is no mention yet of its centum or satem classification (which from what I remember is still debated). I know that Greek chamai ("on the earth") has a Phrygian cognate beginning with 'z' (zama or something, don't remember), and there is also zamelon (slave; meaning "earth-bound" roughly; if that's the right spelling). Decius00:56, 23 Mar 2005 (UTC)

    What are we saying regarding the relation of Phrygian and Armenian? Sadly, not enough of Phrygian is known to be sure, and Armenian made some weird changes, between 600 BC and 400 AD. But Phrygian may be, as it were, the missing link between Greek and Armenian. I am particularly intrigued by the gunai(k)- stem. In Armenian gunay-k, the k is a desinence, while in Greek/Phrygian it is completely irregular. dab (ᛏ)28 June 2005 07:09 (UTC) 1. The article continues to state "Ancient historians and myth did associate it with Thracian and maybe Armenian, on grounds of classical sources.". What assiociation was made by "ancient historians" of connections with Thracian, and, especially, with Armenian? I avoid applying those little tags, but this does need a source. --Wetman01:07, 20 September 2006 (UTC)

    Okay, I admit I am not aware of any ancient record that records that Phrygians migrated from Thrace around 1200 BC---what record is this? Is this merely from a classical author? I'm aware that some classical sources (namely, Herodotus) indicate such a migration, but I don't know of any non-Greek record that does.Decius2 July 2005 09:23 (UTC) 1. I think it's generally accepted as probable, although no definite proof exists, of course. We could mention that the assuption is that the immigration was connected with the repercussions of the collapse of the Hittite Empire (it's always the same, as soon as an empire collapses, neighboring barbarians immigrate/invade) dab (ᛏ)2 July 2005 09:32 (UTC) Yeah, I think the Phrygians did migrate from Thrace ca 1200 BC, but we should leave the question more open in the article, unless conclusive evidence exists. Decius2 July 2005 09:36 (UTC) 1. sure, I'm fine with "probably". dab (ᛏ)2 July 2005 09:38 (UTC) I'm trying to go back to the records themse...

    no, no 'Mysian' is a purely geographical term here, since that's where these inscriptions were found, they are still Phrygian, just in another dialect, "Mysian Phrygian", if you like. dab (ᛏ)9 July 2005 13:00 (UTC) Thanks for the disambig, I didn't know whether scholars were claiming geographically Mysian or ethnically Mysian. Herodotus was probably right then. Decius9 July 2005 13:05 (UTC)

    Next thing to do would be to add some (transliterated) Phrygian sentences into the article. I'm going to dig through Lubotsky and find something. Decius19:53, 13 July 2005 (UTC) I'm going to place some Phrygian sentences here as I decide which to include: 1. 1.1. 1.1.1. Pinke (five) tas (those) dakeres (parts) onomaniais (named) mirou (in the monument) ik (for the) knaiken (wife) edaes(made).---"He has made those five parts named in the monument for the wife." 1. 1.1. 1.1.1. Ios ni semon knoumane kakon daket aini manka.-----"Whoever may afflict harm to this grave or stele." Phrygian kakon (harm) pretty much identical to Ancient Greek kakôn (ill, evil). Aini means 'or, and'. Knoumane means "grave", daket means "does" (PIE *dhe-, 'to set, put'), manka means stele. Etc. 1. 1.1. 1.1.1. Dakaren paterais eukin argou.-----"The parents have erected because of a vow." Dakaren because, since. Decius...

    Albanian bukë 'bread; meal, meal-time' was listed as a cognate for Phrygian bekos 'bread', but the Albanian word is a borrowing from Latin bucca 'cheek'. so, i have removed it. i also added a large number of cognates for the words in the short glossary.Flibjib802:30, 7 August 2006 (UTC)

    These changes by 66.81.157.116 look destructive and there is no discussion on the talk page that suggests why these changes are happening. John Vandenberg23:27, 31 January 2007 (UTC) 1. They are made by a sockpuppet of an indef blocked user: see User:Ararat_arev.--Ευπάτωρ Talk!!23:28, 31 January 2007 (UTC)

    Herodotus only mentioned that the Phrygians originated from Thrace and moved in Asia Minor. He also mentioned that the Armenians were Phrygians colonists. And that is already mentioned! The paragraph that the "In the Herodotus' History they are known to live together with the ancient Macedonian population." is not cited and I don’t personally know such a paragraph! Can someone provide more information? Till then I temporarily removing itSeleukosa12:45, 22 September 2007 (UTC) Further more the Phrygians were people of Asia Minor. They were not people of the Balkan Peninsula! Herodotus mention that the Asia Minor Phrygians were of Thrace origin but that doesn’t make the Phrygians "people of the Balkan Peninsula".Was known and it is already mentioned in the article is that the Phrygians, according to Herodotus were of Thracian descent. And that is all that it should be mentioned.12:59, 22 September 2007 (UTC)

    Is the Phrygian word attagos perhaps related to the Greek word for goat — aíx (αἴξ), aigós (αἰγός)? Hspstudent (talk) 18:31, 30 November 2009 (UTC) 1. I am not an expert or anything, but I would guess it is. --15lsoucy (talk) 22:26, 30 November 2009 (UTC) I'm afraid that on this word there are distant if not irrelevant examples. How come as 15lsoucy said αιγός (aigós) is not included? In Greek you have also τράγος (tragos) which is the male goat. Instead we have Ziege (German), dhi (Albanian) and dec (Ishkashmi)?!?!?!?! --fkitselis —Preceding undatedcomment added 13:22, 16 February 2010 (UTC).

    cut from article:(snip) first, this list is unreferenced, inviting the clueless to add random oter entries, which means we end up with a contaminated list where some entries are valid and others aren't Second, what's with the listing of random IE cognates? I can understand Greek and Armenian cognates, to illustrate the proximity of Phrygian to these languages, but why would anyone list Persian or Latin, let alone Albanian or Romanian?? Third, it isn't usual to grace languages articles with "lists of words". Wikipedia articles aren't dictionaries. Those of the above entries that can be substantiated with a reference should be transwikied to wiktionary. --dab (𒁳)06:43, 13 April 2010 (UTC) Dab, if you give me some time I could give dig up exact references for all the words. I've got the analysis for many Phrygian inscriptions published by various scholars on the field. It is pity not to have a list of words. I agree though we cannot put random IE cognates and that's what I wrote earli...

  6. Thracian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Thraco-Phrygian
    • Geographic Distribution
    • Remnants of The Thracian Language
    • Inscriptions
    • Classification
    • Fate of The Thracians and Their Language
    • See Also
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    The Thracian language or languages were spoken in what is now Bulgaria, Romania, North Macedonia, Northern Greece, European Turkey and in parts of Bithynia(North-Western Asiatic Turkey). Modern-day Eastern Serbia is usually considered by paleolinguists to have been a Daco-Moesian language area. Moesian (after Vladimir Georgiev et al.) is grouped with the Dacian language.

    Little is known for certain about the Thracian languages, since no phrase beyond a few words in length has been satisfactorily deciphered, and the sounder decipherments given for the shorter phrases may not be completely accurate. Some of the longer inscriptions may indeed be Thracian in origin but they may not reflect actual Thracian language sentences, but rather jumbles of names or magical formulas. Enough Thracian lexical items have survived to show that Thracian was a member of the Indo-European language family and that it was a satemized language by the time it is attested.Besides the aforementioned inscriptions, Thracian is attested through personal names, toponyms, hydronyms, phytonyms, divine names, etc. and by a small number of words cited in Ancient Greek texts as being specifically Thracian. Other ancient Greek lexical items were not specifically identified as Thracian by the ancient Greeks but are hypothesized by paleolinguists as being or probably being of Thracian ori...

    The following are the longest inscriptions preserved. The remaining ones are mostly single words or names on vessels and other artifacts.

    The Thracian language in linguistic textbooks is usually treated either as its own branch of Indo-European, or is grouped with Dacian, together forming a Daco-Thracian branch of IE. Older textbooks often grouped it also with Illyrian or Phrygian. The belief that Thracian was close to Phrygian is no longer popular and has mostly been discarded. The Thraco-Illyrian grouping has also been called into question.[citation needed] Daco-Thracian or Thraco-Dacian is the main hypothesis.[citation needed] No definite evidence has yet been found that demonstrates that Thracian or Daco-Thracian belonged on the same branch as Albanian or Baltic or Balto-Slavic or Greco-Macedonian or Phrygian or any other IE branch. For this reason textbooks still treat Thracian as its own branch of Indo-European, or as a Daco-Thracian/Thraco-Dacian branch. The generally accepted clades branched from the Proto-Indo-European language are, in alphabetical order, the Proto-Albanian language, Proto-Anatolian language,...

    According to Skordelis, when Thracians were subjected by Alexander the Great they finally assimilated to Greek culture and became as Greek as Spartans and Athenians, although he considered the Thracian language as a form of Greek. In fact they were closer related to the Scythians, Parni, Sporoi, Dacians, Lud (Luwians), Luđi (Ligii, Lechiti), Eneti-Veneti, Illyrii and to the Indo-European Graeci-Epirotes, Makedonians and Achaei-Achaioi (Danaoi, Argeioi)-Danann-Duninowie then to other Hellenes of Colchian, Hurrian, Hebrew (e.g. slavetraders of Korinth and Byzantion) or Egyptian (intensive under Psamtik I) origin or even to the Celts. Most scholars confuse Hellenes and Greeks and even Celtic, Slavic and Germanic tribes. According to Crampton (1997) most Thracians were eventually Hellenized or Romanized, with the last remnants surviving in remote areas until the 5th century. According to Marinov the Thracians were likely completely Romanized and Hellenized after the last contemporary re...

    V.I. Georgiev, Introduction to the History of the Indo-European Languages, Sofia (1981).
    Georgiev, Vladimir (Jul., 1966). "The Genesis of the Balkan Peoples". The Slavonic and East European Review. 44 (103): 285–297. ISSN 0037-6795. Retrieved 31 May 2021. Check date values in: |date= (...
    I.I. Russu, Limba Traco-Dacilor / Die Sprache der Thrako-Daker, Bucharest (1967, 1969).
    Paul Kretschmer, "Glotta", in: Zeitschrift für griechische und lateinische Sprache 7 (1915).[full citation needed]
  7. Phrygia - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    simple.wikipedia.org › wiki › Phrygia

    The Phrygian people started to live in the area from c. 1200 BC, and made a kingdom in the 8th century BC. It was ruined by Cimmerian invaders c. 690 BC, then conquered by its neighbor Lydia , before it passed successively into the Persian Empire of Cyrus , the empire of Alexander and his successors , was taken by the king of Pergamon , and ...

  8. Palaeolexicon - The Phrygian language

    www.palaeolexicon.com › Phrygian

    The Phrygian language. Phrygian is one of the oldest and least attested Indo-European languages. It is far from being completely understood and decipherment is still in progress. Unlike other poorly attested languages, Phrygian has written records in the Phrygian and later the Greek alphabet.

  9. Phrygian language | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › topic › Phrygian-language

    Phrygian language, ancient Indo-European language of west-central Anatolia. Textual evidence for Phrygian falls into two distinct groups. Old Phrygian texts date from the 8th to 3rd centuries bce and are written in an alphabet related to but different from that of Greek.

  10. Translation of the Phrygian language - Maravot

    www.maravot.com › Phrygian1L

    The Phrygian language Translation of Phrygian scripts (continued : Phrygian1L.html) Notes on Pausanias, and other ancient records. by Mel Copeland (Based on a related work, Etruscan Phrases, first published in 1981) Notes with a discussion on ancient records of Pausanias, etc. Extracts from texts as they may relate to the Phrygian culture and ...

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